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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2000
Pierre Pflimlin, 93, former president of the European Parliament and the European Council. Pflimlin, the mayor of Strasbourg, France, from 1959 to 1983, was a lawyer with vast experience in government and a strong belief in a unified Europe. He became the European Council president in 1955, and then became finance minister and cooperation minister. A member of the European Parliament from 1979 to 1989, he served as its vice president and then became president in 1987.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
The euro tumbled to yet another low Wednesday in its steepest sell-off ever, not only falling below 90 cents for the first time, but also retreating below 89 cents. The response of the European Central Bank was calm as its vice chairman appeared before the European Parliament and predicted that the currency of 11 nations would rebound because of economic growth.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Is there any privacy left in the Internet Age? Not according to some Europeans, who fear that the U.S. government regularly eavesdrops on their phone calls, reads their e-mail, checks their pagers and scans their faxes. The suspected snoops mostly work for America's largest and perhaps most secretive spy service, the National Security Agency. Responsible for providing U.S.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
It felt like there was a new Cold War developing at a conference here last week on computers, networks and international security, only this time the adversaries are the United States and Europe and the field of conflict is cyberspace. The revelation last year about the collaborative electronic eavesdropping system developed by the U.S. National Security Agency and British intelligence agencies, a system known as Echelon, has become a huge topic of discussion in Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1999 | SIMON DAVIES, Simon Davies is a visiting fellow in the Computer Security Research Centre in the London School of Economics and director of the human rights group, Privacy International
Europe is discretely gearing up for one of the most interesting legal battles in its history. At stake is the future of the world's most secretive intelligence organization, America's National Security Agency. The NSA is in the business of eavesdropping on the world's communications networks for the benefit of the United States. In doing so, it has built a vast spying operation that reaches into the telephone systems of nearly every country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999
The elections to the European Parliament over the weekend, in which the right-leaning parties scored big gains, have dealt a blow to the left-leaning governments of key European Union countries, especially Britain and Germany. That will not make decision-making in Europe easier, considering that most of the important issues are decided in London or Bonn.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Left-leaning parties across Europe were apparently swept from posts in the European Parliament after elections marked by low turnout and a paucity of riveting issues. Center-right parties emerged victorious for the first time in two decades, striking a blow at the Socialists who run 11 governments in the 15 European Union nations. Preliminary results gave center-right Christian Democrats 224 seats in the new 626-member assembly; the Socialists plunged to 180.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
The Internet Society is urging the European Parliament to modify a proposed directive aimed at protecting copyrights that could make Web caching illegal. Internet service providers make caches, or copies, of popular Web sites and store them close to end users to reduce overall traffic on the Internet. Otherwise, the route to a popular site can clog up, resulting in slower transmission speeds and hogging the resources of the network.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
European Union leaders, long accustomed to British skepticism about a united Europe, came to London with nagging questions Friday but went home smiling. After a week in office, Prime Minister Tony Blair is moving quickly--but cautiously--to smooth ruffled feathers among continental partners who admire his winning political flair but wonder how deep his commitment runs to their dream of a united Europe.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | From Reuters
Austria's far right triumphed in European Parliament elections Sunday, bolstering its position as Europe's most popular nationalist party at the expense of Chancellor Franz Vranitzky's Social Democrats. The conservative People's Party led by Foreign Minister Wolfgang Schuessel notched up the top score in Austria's first European election Sunday. But the rise in far-right support saw one of the most dramatic shifts in voter allegiance in Austria's democratic history.
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