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September 8, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Working poles apart--on the crystal crown of the Arctic icecap and on the ice domes of Antarctica--researchers are coming to grips with Earth's frozen past in order to predict its future. For scientists trying to learn how global warming may affect the climate's course, understanding the character and chemistry of the ice and snow at the planet's extremities has taken on an unusual urgency.
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NEWS
September 8, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Working poles apart--on the crystal crown of the Arctic icecap and on the ice domes of Antarctica--researchers are coming to grips with Earth's frozen past in order to predict its future. For scientists trying to learn how global warming may affect the climate's course, understanding the character and chemistry of the ice and snow at the planet's extremities has taken on an unusual urgency.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989 | LAURA MYERS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A scientist braved numbing subzero temperatures this summer to uncover more than 800 years of Earth's climate trends that may reveal whether the planet is warming up because of modern man's excesses. Dr. Kendrick Taylor of Reno's Desert Research Institute endured temperatures that plunged to 40 below zero Fahrenheit and occasionally warmed to freezing as he joined a team of American researchers on the six-week Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2.
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