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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1992
Slobodan Dimitrov of the Serbian-American Community Relations Coalition, Los Angeles, finds it necessary to warn his American fellow citizens in a letter (July 1) to not trust German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, regarding his remarks on a delay of European unification (June 18). Dimitrov refers mainly to the German past and to a German "engagement" in the war in Yugoslavia. I can understand that Dimitrov as a Serbian was angered by the German decision to recognize an independent Croatia.
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NEWS
December 11, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a nudge from the United States, Turkey early today put economic promise ahead of national pride by accepting an invitation to European Union membership that might ultimately scuttle its disputed claims to Cyprus and several Aegean islands. At first, Turkish officials balked at the terms set out by the rich Western alliance for the membership it sought 13 years ago, with one diplomat saying the attached conditions meant "selling out Cyprus."
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NEWS
January 1, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western Europe today took its greatest stride toward unity in four decades when it officially launched the euro, its first common currency since the Roman Empire two millenniums ago. The historic commitment by Germany, France, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and half a dozen other nations is meant as the capstone for the borderless economy that governments in Europe have been constructing, in fits and starts, since the dark years after World War II.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tony Blair on Tuesday launched preparations for Britain to join the European monetary union, declaring in his strongest language yet that the country "should join a successful single currency." Blair presented to the House of Commons a 65-page blueprint for preparations to join the euro currency and said the government would spend tens of millions of dollars in the next few years to get ready.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | Associated Press
Germany ratified the treaty on European political and economic union Friday, becoming the 10th of the 12 European Community nations to sign on. Still undecided on the issue are Denmark, whose voters have already refused once to ratify the so-called Maastricht Treaty, and Britain, where opposition is strong. All 12 EC nations, which signed the treaty in the Dutch town of Maastricht last year, must ratify the accord before it takes effect.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Publicly expressing doubts about the European unity timetable for the first time, Chancellor Helmut Kohl warned Monday that such a union is the only way to avoid war on the Continent. In a television interview at the Austrian lake where he is vacationing, Kohl acknowledged the possibility that the 1999 deadline for implementing a single European currency may not be met. But the German leader cautioned against any easing of the Maastricht Treaty guidelines for forming a monetary union.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story begins with life falling to pieces for an expatriate Japanese businessman in Dusseldorf. His small trading company goes kaput. His wife abandons him, taking their 10-year-old daughter back to Tokyo and leaving him and the family dog behind. The man then ventures off on an aimless drive through the German countryside and strays across the border into France, where the heavy hand of fate intervenes.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western Europe's political leaders scrambled Wednesday to maintain their march toward political and economic unity in the wake of the stunning decision by Danish voters to drop out of formation. No matter how well the politicians succeed, however, the Danish vote could leave a long-lasting blot on Europe's ambitions to act as a world-class economic and diplomatic player. More narrowly, it could also interfere with the expansion plans of the 12-nation European Community.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1998 | From Reuters
European Union ministers voiced guarded optimism Friday that a deal on naming the first head of the European Central Bank would be reached at a weekend summit, averting a clash at the birth of a single European currency.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1998 | From Reuters
European currencies and bond markets are expected to give the euro a damp welcome today, with sentiment dented by fears that the European Central Bank's policy could be politically influenced. The European Union's move to split the term of the ECB presidency between Dutch and French candidates opened the way for the independent central bank to be subject to political interference, analysts said Sunday.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western Europe's new money was supposed to be called the ecu, short for "European currency unit" and the name of an old French coin. But the Germans objected. One reason: ecu sounds too much like eine Kuh, German for "a cow." So European Union leaders in December 1995 agreed instead on euro--as in Europe. This month, the euro made its promising debut on world markets as the official, shared currency of 11 countries.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western Europe today took its greatest stride toward unity in four decades when it officially launched the euro, its first common currency since the Roman Empire two millenniums ago. The historic commitment by Germany, France, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and half a dozen other nations is meant as the capstone for the borderless economy that governments in Europe have been constructing, in fits and starts, since the dark years after World War II.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1998 | From Reuters
European currencies and bond markets are expected to give the euro a damp welcome today, with sentiment dented by fears that the European Central Bank's policy could be politically influenced. The European Union's move to split the term of the ECB presidency between Dutch and French candidates opened the way for the independent central bank to be subject to political interference, analysts said Sunday.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one of Europe's most momentous days since the Berlin Wall was sledgehammered into dust, leaders of the European Union agreed Saturday to launch a single and shared currency in 11 of their countries next Jan. 1, a giant stride toward greater economic and political integration. But they argued bitterly past midnight over who would head the bank that is to manage the new money.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe's Alan Greenspan will be a Dutchman--but for four years only. Then, if the game plan holds, he'll become French. After late-night horse-trading Saturday to fill what promises to be one of the world's most influential jobs in economics and finance, the presidency of the new European Central Bank, the favored--and, at one time, only--candidate, Willem Frederik "Wim" Duisenberg, 62, got only half the job.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1998 | From Reuters
European Union ministers voiced guarded optimism Friday that a deal on naming the first head of the European Central Bank would be reached at a weekend summit, averting a clash at the birth of a single European currency.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | From Associated Press
France's new Socialist-led government added more doubts to the European Union's single-currency project Monday by delaying a key agreement to underpin the strength and stability of the "euro." French Finance Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn insisted that Paris still wants the monetary union to start as planned Jan. 1, 1999. But currency markets saw the EU's failure to agree on a "stability pact" as a sign the euro's launch may be delayed.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of public confusion and doubt, leaders from 15 of Europe's richest nations are gathering here to launch a long-awaited review of the 1991 treaty that commits them to the lofty goals of economic and political unity. Officially known as the Intergovernmental Conference, or IGC, the review amounts to a de facto constitutional convention on the ties that bind the European Union's member states. It is expected to last at least a year.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heard the watchword driving Europe Inc. as this continent and the entire world segue into one global marketplace? It's "merge"--or risk being submerged. In 1997, more big businesses in Europe got hitched than ever before. The Continent, one Paris-based newspaper said, came down with "merger madness." On one day, five mega-marriages worth a total of more than $40 billion were announced. Why the rush?
BUSINESS
February 1, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
What difference will it make when Europe has a single currency, the "euro"? It will make a big difference. "European monetary union has the potential to create the largest single financial market in the world," says Bronwyn Curtis, the London-based economist of Nomura Securities.
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