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Eurostar

BUSINESS
March 29, 1991
Fluor Daniel Inc., an Irvine-based engineering and construction company, said Wednesday that it has won a contract to help build a $250-million automotive assembly plant in Austria to make Chrysler minivans. The Fluor Corp. subsidiary was awarded the contract by Eurostar, a Graz, Austria, joint venture between Chrysler Corp. and Austria's Steyr-Daimler-Puch. The company will share the work with three other companies based in Detroit and St. Louis.
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NEWS
December 5, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after a fire closed the Channel Tunnel, passenger trains resumed near-normal service between London and Paris on Wednesday, a reopening greeted by champagne and unabated controversy. Ten journalists were the only passengers when the first Eurostar left London's Waterloo Station at 5:50 a.m., but traffic built up during the day as the line resumed about 90% of its scheduled service to Paris and Brussels. "There were no technical problems at all today. Safety is our No. 1 priority.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Graffiti impresario Banksy and airbrush-wielding guerrilla artists blanketed the walls of an abandoned London tunnel with offbeat murals Friday as part of a three-day stencil-art street party. Banksy marshaled more than three dozen international artists for what he's calling the "Cans Festival" -- and is encouraging visitors to contribute their own graffiti starting today. "I'm hoping we can transform a dark forgotten filth pit into an oasis of beautiful art -- in a dark forgotten filth pit," Banksy was quoted as saying in the Times of London, which carried a preview of the exhibition Friday.
TRAVEL
May 18, 1997
The train service that carries tourists and their cars through the Channel Tunnel, between Folkestone, Britain, and Calais, France, resumed its full schedule last week. Le Shuttle had reduced service to two trains each way per hour, from four trains each way per hour, after a fire in November damaged part of the tunnel. Repairs on the damaged track were finished last week. Round-trip fares start at about $103 per car, regardless of the number of people riding in it.
TRAVEL
June 11, 1995
San Francisco's Galleria Park Hotel, 191 Sutter St., a Kimpton Group hotel, will offer discounted weekend rates July 1 through Aug. 31 based on the last two digits of the year you were born. So, if you were born in 1940, you pay $40 a night. (Regularly published rates start at $149.) Rates are based on availability and single occupancy; a second person is $20 per night.
TRAVEL
September 4, 1994
Once again, there is a scheduled start date for Channel Tunnel passenger train service between London and Paris and London and Brussels. But so far, there are no rates, no reservations nor any firm word on how many trains will be making the first trips. High-speed passenger service, called Eurostar, is scheduled to begin Oct. 23 (pending final approval by a Joint Inter-Governmental Committee).
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with the tourists and traders speeding in air-conditioned comfort through the Channel Tunnel linking Britain and the rest of Europe, increasing numbers of undocumented immigrants are arriving in London seeking political asylum. The traffic is orchestrated, British officials say, by legally savvy and technologically sophisticated people movers--a tony European version of the "coyotes" who work the Rio Grande.
TRAVEL
September 23, 2007 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
London Bargain airlines hold surprises in Europe, where trains zoom between cities at up to 199 mph. But not so fast! Which is best for navigating the Continent? Ease and economy duke it out. -- Cheap, fast transportation continues to be the talk of Europe, where dozens of budget airlines tout fares as low as $1 and trains blaze through 10 nations at 150 mph and more. Planes cost less and get you there faster. Trains cost more and take longer. So it's clear that planes ace trains, right? Wrong.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2003 | Karl Zimmermann
In Europe, better and faster trains are the order of the day. In the United States, the good news is that Amtrak apparently is secure for another year. In British Columbia, the poor economy has caused BC Rail to eliminate its passenger service on what once was among North America's most scenic routes. Here are contacts for selected trains around the world. (Note: Some numbers are for U.S.
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