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February 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A second levee along the rain-swollen Rock River broke near the town of Hillsdale, Ill., sending as many as 150 area residents scrambling for higher ground. Some people fled through water that reached the cabs of their four-wheel-drive vehicles, said Fire Chief K.B. Melton of rural Erie, about 10 miles from Hillsdale in the northwestern part of the state. The levee was too far gone to be reinforced with sandbags, he said.
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NEWS
February 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A second levee along the rain-swollen Rock River broke near the town of Hillsdale, Ill., sending as many as 150 area residents scrambling for higher ground. Some people fled through water that reached the cabs of their four-wheel-drive vehicles, said Fire Chief K.B. Melton of rural Erie, about 10 miles from Hillsdale in the northwestern part of the state. The levee was too far gone to be reinforced with sandbags, he said.
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NEWS
July 27, 1993 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river was not to be denied. It crept in like an encroaching fog, securing the land in silence. The Mississippi's conquest of the tiny hamlet of Hull started out discreetly, hours after the river had first breached the sand wall of the massive Sny Island Levee. Probing fingers of river water ran along ditches and culverts, into the hidden corners of 45,000 acres of fertile farmland.
NEWS
February 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Flood waters in the northwest and central parts of the state chased hundreds of residents out of their homes. Peoria residents stacked sandbags as the Illinois River reached 5 1/2 feet above flood stage, with a high of 8 feet predicted. In Hillsdale, Fire Chief Rick Mitton took a boat to work as the Rock River covered 95% of the town, forcing most of its 500 residents to flee, he said. Two subdivisions in nearby Erie and 15,000 acres of farmland were also under water, Fire Chief K.B.
NEWS
February 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Flood waters in the northwest and central parts of the state chased hundreds of residents out of their homes. Peoria residents stacked sandbags as the Illinois River reached 5 1/2 feet above flood stage, with a high of 8 feet predicted. In Hillsdale, Fire Chief Rick Mitton took a boat to work as the Rock River covered 95% of the town, forcing most of its 500 residents to flee, he said. Two subdivisions in nearby Erie and 15,000 acres of farmland were also under water, Fire Chief K.B.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It looked Wednesday like the people beat the river. They gambled. They punched a hole in a levee. Then they gambled again. They dynamited two more holes. Finally, in a risk that seemed crazy, they dug the two holes bigger. In the end, their hydraulic wizardry drew floodwater from the Mississippi River away from Prairie du Rocher, an 18th-Century French settlement that is home to 602 people. The wizardry ruined 50 farmhouses and flooded 47,000 acres of cropland.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | MARC LACEY and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To the wail of sirens in the night, officials evacuated this 18th-Century French settlement late Tuesday, fearful that they had lost a bad gamble: They had cut an upstream levee in one last, desperate effort to save the town. "The water is rising, and we'll probably lose it tonight . . . ," declared Robbie Aubuchon, a village trustee, after he sounded the sirens and yelled at townspeople, urging them to leave. "Things are dangerous as they can get. We don't want people drowning.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It looked Wednesday like the people beat the river. They gambled. They punched a hole in a levee. Then they gambled again. They dynamited two more holes. Finally, in a risk that seemed crazy, they dug the two holes bigger. In the end, their hydraulic wizardry drew floodwater from the Mississippi River away from Prairie du Rocher, an 18th-Century French settlement that is home to 602 people. The wizardry ruined 50 farmhouses and flooded 47,000 acres of cropland.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | MARC LACEY and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To the wail of sirens in the night, officials evacuated this 18th-Century French settlement late Tuesday, fearful that they had lost a bad gamble: They had cut an upstream levee in one last, desperate effort to save the town. "The water is rising, and we'll probably lose it tonight . . . ," declared Robbie Aubuchon, a village trustee, after he sounded the sirens and yelled at townspeople, urging them to leave. "Things are dangerous as they can get. We don't want people drowning.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river was not to be denied. It crept in like an encroaching fog, securing the land in silence. The Mississippi's conquest of the tiny hamlet of Hull started out discreetly, hours after the river had first breached the sand wall of the massive Sny Island Levee. Probing fingers of river water ran along ditches and culverts, into the hidden corners of 45,000 acres of fertile farmland.
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