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Evacuations Iraq

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NEWS
August 8, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirty-nine Americans are being detained in a Baghdad hotel and 500 others have been blocked from leaving Iraq since Saddam Hussein's regime invaded Kuwait last week, the State Department reported Tuesday. Although a few Americans have managed to get out of occupied Kuwait, about 3,500 U.S. citizens are unable to depart because the main airport is closed and roads are blocked, department officials added.
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WORLD
May 26, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Militant Protestant supporters of a Scottish soccer team beat to death a Roman Catholic man in the latest sign of how sports rivalries inspire sectarian bloodshed in Northern Ireland, police and politicians said. Witnesses said more than 20 Protestant supporters of the Glasgow Rangers, many of them wearing the team's blue-and-white jerseys and scarves, drove into a Catholic district of the town of Coleraine after the Rangers clinched the Scottish Premier League championship Sunday.
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NEWS
January 12, 1991 | Associated Press
NBC and CNN said Friday that their news crews will stay in Baghdad as long as they're allowed to, despite the evacuation of foreigners from the Iraqi capital. CBS was considering the matter, and ABC would not comment. An estimated 200 Americans, including 40 journalists, remained in Baghdad on Friday, four days before the Jan. 15 deadline for Iraq to leave Kuwait or face attack from a U.S.-led military alliance. NBC has six people in Baghdad, and Cable News Network has seven.
WORLD
March 18, 2003 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Amid recriminations and resignation, the diplomatic door closed Monday on the Security Council, and the United Nations began withdrawing inspectors and aid workers from Iraq in anticipation of a U.S.-led attack. Despite last-minute appeals by the ambassadors from the United States, Britain and Spain, the council could not muster an eleventh-hour agreement on a resolution seeking U.N. backing for an attack against the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least four major foreign embassies shut down unceremoniously here Thursday, and others prepared to close, strengthening the feeling that diplomacy to avert war has reached a dead end. The excited anticipation that greeted Wednesday's talks between Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz quickly gave way to disillusionment when the talks ended in failure, and some embassies lost no time in packing up.
NEWS
November 26, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration offered Monday to evacuate about 5,000 people from northern Iraq to protect them from President Saddam Hussein's secret police. The offer, announced by State Department spokesman Glyn Davies, applies to employees of U.S.-affiliated nongovernmental organizations and their immediate families. Most of the nongovernmental organization workers are Kurds and other Iraqi citizens.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Bernard Shaw, part of the Cable News Network team that held America spellbound with reports on the beginning of the war in the Persian Gulf, thanked King Hussein of Jordan on Friday for helping him and several colleagues make their way from Baghdad to safety in Amman, Jordan.
WORLD
May 26, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Militant Protestant supporters of a Scottish soccer team beat to death a Roman Catholic man in the latest sign of how sports rivalries inspire sectarian bloodshed in Northern Ireland, police and politicians said. Witnesses said more than 20 Protestant supporters of the Glasgow Rangers, many of them wearing the team's blue-and-white jerseys and scarves, drove into a Catholic district of the town of Coleraine after the Rangers clinched the Scottish Premier League championship Sunday.
WORLD
March 18, 2003 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Amid recriminations and resignation, the diplomatic door closed Monday on the Security Council, and the United Nations began withdrawing inspectors and aid workers from Iraq in anticipation of a U.S.-led attack. Despite last-minute appeals by the ambassadors from the United States, Britain and Spain, the council could not muster an eleventh-hour agreement on a resolution seeking U.N. backing for an attack against the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
November 26, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration offered Monday to evacuate about 5,000 people from northern Iraq to protect them from President Saddam Hussein's secret police. The offer, announced by State Department spokesman Glyn Davies, applies to employees of U.S.-affiliated nongovernmental organizations and their immediate families. Most of the nongovernmental organization workers are Kurds and other Iraqi citizens.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Bernard Shaw, part of the Cable News Network team that held America spellbound with reports on the beginning of the war in the Persian Gulf, thanked King Hussein of Jordan on Friday for helping him and several colleagues make their way from Baghdad to safety in Amman, Jordan.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | Associated Press
NBC and CNN said Friday that their news crews will stay in Baghdad as long as they're allowed to, despite the evacuation of foreigners from the Iraqi capital. CBS was considering the matter, and ABC would not comment. An estimated 200 Americans, including 40 journalists, remained in Baghdad on Friday, four days before the Jan. 15 deadline for Iraq to leave Kuwait or face attack from a U.S.-led military alliance. NBC has six people in Baghdad, and Cable News Network has seven.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least four major foreign embassies shut down unceremoniously here Thursday, and others prepared to close, strengthening the feeling that diplomacy to avert war has reached a dead end. The excited anticipation that greeted Wednesday's talks between Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz quickly gave way to disillusionment when the talks ended in failure, and some embassies lost no time in packing up.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirty-nine Americans are being detained in a Baghdad hotel and 500 others have been blocked from leaving Iraq since Saddam Hussein's regime invaded Kuwait last week, the State Department reported Tuesday. Although a few Americans have managed to get out of occupied Kuwait, about 3,500 U.S. citizens are unable to depart because the main airport is closed and roads are blocked, department officials added.
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