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Evacuations Northern California

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NEWS
July 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
A huge gate at Folsom Dam broke open Monday, spilling enough water each second to supply a family of five for a year. The break forced evacuation of boaters, hikers and anglers along the American River, but posed no immediate danger to communities downstream. Dam operators said they may not be able to stop the water roaring out of the broken gate for up to a week, until the water level drops 40 feet to the top of the spillway.
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NEWS
February 19, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which pieces of your life do you take when you have just 20 minutes to choose and two trash bags to haul it in? Clutching a flashlight in one hand, a box of heavy-duty trash bags in the other, Linda Morales recited from the inventory of belongings she planned to grab from her landslide-threatened home once rescue workers let her back in. "I want my daughter's stuffed animals, my dog's medicine, my son's first edition Stephen King books," Morales said. "I want dishes, clothes. . . ."
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NEWS
July 27, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A huge white cloud of sulfuric acid spewed from a ruptured railroad car Monday, engulfing thousands of homes in Contra Costa County and sending more than 3,200 people to hospitals with such symptoms as burning eyes and breathing problems, authorities said. The stinging, smelly chemical poured out of the rail car for more than three hours, creating a cloud 1,000 feet high and up to eight miles wide, before rail yard workers were able to cap the leak.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | MARK ARAX and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The placid San Joaquin River erupted in a rampage Saturday that burst through farm levees and threatened towns along its length as state disaster officials braced for new flooding. Elsewhere in Northern California, the surging rivers that have forced evacuation of more than 100,000 people began to level off. But along the normally tranquil San Joaquin, the crisis may be just unfolding. "It's actually getting worse," said Bill Draper, spokesman for the California Department of Water Resources.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 10-mile-long toxic chemical plume that spewed from a derailed tanker car into the upper Sacramento River was expected to reach California's biggest reservoir today, after devastating a stretch of the river's ecosystem, experts said. Some predicted it would take 10 years for the river to recover.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of Northern Californians fled their homes Monday as the third in a series of warm, moisture-laden Pacific storms barreled into the state, pushing Wine Country rivers well beyond their banks, inundating roads throughout the region and killing at least one person. With weather forecasters eyeing two more storms gaining strength off the coast, evacuations were under way from just north of San Francisco to Eureka, near the state line.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which pieces of your life do you take when you have just 20 minutes to choose and two trash bags to haul it in? Clutching a flashlight in one hand, a box of heavy-duty trash bags in the other, Linda Morales recited from the inventory of belongings she planned to grab from her landslide-threatened home once rescue workers let her back in. "I want my daughter's stuffed animals, my dog's medicine, my son's first edition Stephen King books," Morales said. "I want dishes, clothes. . . ."
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA and BILL STALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 1,700 firefighters from throughout the state battled the worst California wildfire of the season Tuesday, an arson-sparked blaze in rural, hilly San Luis Obispo County that has claimed 37 homes and scorched 45,500 acres. The Highway 41 fire--so dubbed because of its danger to the state highway that links scenic California 1 and U.S. 101 near Atascadero--is the "most high-priority fire" in the state, said Thomas Williams, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Torrents of rain pelted Northern California's wine country on Sunday, boosting rivers to dangerously high levels, activating sandbag brigades and forcing hundreds of residents from their homes. Officials in Napa and Sonoma counties declared local states of emergency Sunday as river levels crept upward and forecasters warned that rainfall could continue through midweek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The discharge of toxic fumes that sent 36 people to the hospital and required the evacuation of a manufacturing plant was blamed on a worker who tried to improperly dispose of hazardous waste in an oven. The Aromat Corp. employee was trying to dry discarded epoxy resin in the oven when the cyanide-laced gaseous discharge occurred, said plant manager Charlie Major, who would not name the worker.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Gagos family did not easily give up their home of 35 years to the great New Year's week floods. They fought through the night to stop the brown water creeping across their backyard. They filled sandbags nonstop, helped by friends who hauled in truckloads of sand and empty sacks. "We worked like dogs putting those on the outside," George Gagos said Saturday. "But then my daughter looked down and noticed that water was coming in through one of the vents under the house."
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
A huge gate at Folsom Dam broke open Monday, spilling enough water each second to supply a family of five for a year. The break forced evacuation of boaters, hikers and anglers along the American River, but posed no immediate danger to communities downstream. Dam operators said they may not be able to stop the water roaring out of the broken gate for up to a week, until the water level drops 40 feet to the top of the spillway.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of Northern Californians fled their homes Monday as the third in a series of warm, moisture-laden Pacific storms barreled into the state, pushing Wine Country rivers well beyond their banks, inundating roads throughout the region and killing at least one person. With weather forecasters eyeing two more storms gaining strength off the coast, evacuations were under way from just north of San Francisco to Eureka, near the state line.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Torrents of rain pelted Northern California's wine country on Sunday, boosting rivers to dangerously high levels, activating sandbag brigades and forcing hundreds of residents from their homes. Officials in Napa and Sonoma counties declared local states of emergency Sunday as river levels crept upward and forecasters warned that rainfall could continue through midweek.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Orange County residents braced for a new round of storms expected today, torrents of heavy rain pelted northern California's wine country on Sunday, boosting rivers to dangerously high levels, activating sandbag brigades and forcing hundreds of residents from their homes. Officials in Napa and Sonoma counties declared local states of emergency Sunday as river levels crept upward and forecasters warned that rainfall could continue through midweek.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA and BILL STALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 1,700 firefighters from throughout the state battled the worst California wildfire of the season Tuesday, an arson-sparked blaze in rural, hilly San Luis Obispo County that has claimed 37 homes and scorched 45,500 acres. The Highway 41 fire--so dubbed because of its danger to the state highway that links scenic California 1 and U.S. 101 near Atascadero--is the "most high-priority fire" in the state, said Thomas Williams, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | United Press International
An estimated 1,000 rush-hour commuters were evacuated from an underground BART train Wednesday after electrical arcing dropped ceiling tiles near a train car, cutting power and possibly starting a small fire. There were no injuries in the 8:54 a.m. outage at the 19th Street station, according to Capt. Mike Kelly of the Oakland Fire Department. Bay Area Rapid Transit's Concord-to-San Francisco trains resumed normal service through the 19th Street station by 11:16 a.m.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | Associated Press
A mysterious odor sent 16 people to hospitals on Wednesday and twice forced the evacuation of hundreds of inmates from cells at the Santa Clara County Jail. The source of the apparent gas leak could not be located. "It's a mystery, but we determined that whatever it was was not explosive or toxic," said Fire Capt. Dave Moore. Eight city employees were treated for nausea at nearby hospitals in the first incident, which took place around 9 a.m., police said.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | From staff and wire reports
A racing arson fire roared toward this Central California city Monday night, prompting several hundred people to flee and raining ash on nearby communities, authorities said. Help was called in from around the state as firefighters fought to keep the blaze from destroying homes. About 950 firefighters were on the line, accompanied by water-dropping helicopters, said Glenda Powell, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Forestry.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | From staff and wire reports
A racing arson fire roared toward this Central California city Monday night, prompting several hundred people to flee and raining ash on nearby communities, authorities said. Help was called in from around the state as firefighters fought to keep the blaze from destroying homes. About 950 firefighters were on the line, accompanied by water-dropping helicopters, said Glenda Powell, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Forestry.
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