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Evacuations Texas

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NEWS
April 3, 1997 | Associated Press
Mystery fumes sickened office-building workers for a second straight day Wednesday, and 30 were taken to hospitals. The nine-story Overton Centre Tower had to be evacuated, just as it was Tuesday when hundreds of workers began gasping, collapsing and screaming for help amid noxious fumes. The building was closed until specialists could be hired to find the source of the problem. "We never like to get to the point where we put up our hands and give up," Fire Lt. Kent Worley said.
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WORLD
July 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Emily blasted northeastern Mexico with powerful winds and rains Wednesday, demolishing homes, triggering floods and forcing evacuations on both sides of the Mexican-U.S. border. The week-old hurricane packing winds of 125 mph came ashore before dawn near San Fernando, about 80 miles south of the border, and spread destruction even as it steadily weakened to tropical storm strength by late in the day.
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NEWS
December 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Downpours continued Thursday in rain-soaked southeast Texas, increasing the threat of flooding along already swollen rivers. President Bush declared the region a disaster area. Officials in Wharton urged 1,800 persons to leave their homes as water from the Colorado River moved into their neighborhood, but many appeared to be waiting until the last minute. Benny McDonald, 59, said he was not ready to leave.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | Associated Press
Mystery fumes sickened office-building workers for a second straight day Wednesday, and 30 were taken to hospitals. The nine-story Overton Centre Tower had to be evacuated, just as it was Tuesday when hundreds of workers began gasping, collapsing and screaming for help amid noxious fumes. The building was closed until specialists could be hired to find the source of the problem. "We never like to get to the point where we put up our hands and give up," Fire Lt. Kent Worley said.
NEWS
April 29, 1995 | Reuters
Portions of Houston's federal courthouse were evacuated and several blocks of the business district were briefly cordoned off Friday after a bomb scare, police said. Authorities sounded the all-clear a short time later after determining that a suspicious item in the back of a black Ford Bronco parked near the courthouse was only a stereo speaker, police said. The driver of the vehicle aroused police suspicion when he began running after spotting a courthouse guard.
WORLD
July 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Emily blasted northeastern Mexico with powerful winds and rains Wednesday, demolishing homes, triggering floods and forcing evacuations on both sides of the Mexican-U.S. border. The week-old hurricane packing winds of 125 mph came ashore before dawn near San Fernando, about 80 miles south of the border, and spread destruction even as it steadily weakened to tropical storm strength by late in the day.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush spent Saturday monitoring the government's response to Hurricane Rita, sitting in on a military briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., and then returning to his home state to tour an emergency operations center. The president, whose administration was criticized for its slow response to Hurricane Katrina a month ago, said he was pleased with the government's performance in the latest storm to slam into the Gulf Coast region.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Supply worries helped push oil futures above $80 a barrel Wednesday, before the commodity closed at a record high of $79.91. That could pressure consumers and businesses already stung by sluggish housing prices and a credit crunch. With gasoline prices rising, motorists and corporations are studying their shrinking wallets with alarm, signaling more turbulence ahead for an economy that so far has weathered high energy costs.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2005 | T. Christian Miller and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
Katrina's deadly rampage had at least one beneficial effect, disaster experts said Sunday: It ensured that government agencies took the next big storm, Hurricane Rita, very seriously. This time, the federal government dispatched troops sooner, sent supplies earlier and coordinated more smoothly with local authorities. The consensus is that the response helped minimize the loss of life from a storm that was damaging, though less powerful than Katrina.
NEWS
April 29, 1995 | Reuters
Portions of Houston's federal courthouse were evacuated and several blocks of the business district were briefly cordoned off Friday after a bomb scare, police said. Authorities sounded the all-clear a short time later after determining that a suspicious item in the back of a black Ford Bronco parked near the courthouse was only a stereo speaker, police said. The driver of the vehicle aroused police suspicion when he began running after spotting a courthouse guard.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Downpours continued Thursday in rain-soaked southeast Texas, increasing the threat of flooding along already swollen rivers. President Bush declared the region a disaster area. Officials in Wharton urged 1,800 persons to leave their homes as water from the Colorado River moved into their neighborhood, but many appeared to be waiting until the last minute. Benny McDonald, 59, said he was not ready to leave.
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