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Evacuations Zaire

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NEWS
June 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Foreigners fleeing fighting in the capital, Brazzaville, said a private militia had gained the upper hand after four days of street clashes with government forces. What began as an attempt by government forces to disarm members of the 5,000-strong militia had evolved into anarchy and a full-scale battle for control of the city, the witnesses said. In Washington, the State Department ordered the departure from Brazzaville of all nonessential U.S.
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NEWS
June 18, 1997 | BOB DROGIN and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Times dispatched Johannesburg bureau chief Bob Drogin and Berlin bureau chief Mary Williams Walsh to Zaire to cover the fall of Mobutu Sese Seko. This joint account of their adventure begins in Drogin's voice; the italics are Walsh. * This city was wild in the best of times. And this was the eve of war. Two days before, I had flown in a South African military cargo plane to Pointe-Noire to cover last-ditch peace talks between Zairian rulers and rebels.
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NEWS
June 18, 1997 | BOB DROGIN and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Times dispatched Johannesburg bureau chief Bob Drogin and Berlin bureau chief Mary Williams Walsh to Zaire to cover the fall of Mobutu Sese Seko. This joint account of their adventure begins in Drogin's voice; the italics are Walsh. * This city was wild in the best of times. And this was the eve of war. Two days before, I had flown in a South African military cargo plane to Pointe-Noire to cover last-ditch peace talks between Zairian rulers and rebels.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | Reuters
A U.S. military plane flew 30 Americans and 24 other people out of troubled Brazzaville in the Republic of Congo on Tuesday, but no decision was immediately made to evacuate the estimated 64 Americans remaining there, the Pentagon said. The evacuees were flown to Gabon on a C-130 that carried a U.S. military team to the Republic of Congo capital from Germany earlier in the day.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | Reuters
A U.S. military plane flew 30 Americans and 24 other people out of troubled Brazzaville in the Republic of Congo on Tuesday, but no decision was immediately made to evacuate the estimated 64 Americans remaining there, the Pentagon said. The evacuees were flown to Gabon on a C-130 that carried a U.S. military team to the Republic of Congo capital from Germany earlier in the day.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton administration reportedly is sending "several hundred" U.S. troops to western Africa to prepare for a possible evacuation of about 650 U.S. citizens from Zaire and has asked dependents of U.S. Embassy personnel to leave the strife-torn Central African nation. Speaking on condition of anonymity, Pentagon sources told the Associated Press that the U.S. forces had already begun their movement toward Africa as part of a "joint task force." They said up to 250 U.S.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Zairian guards evacuated nearly 400 Belgians from riot-torn Zaire on Saturday aboard President Mobutu Sese Seko's personal yacht after telling Belgian commandos not to intervene following two days of fierce rioting. The refugees, mostly Belgian but including about 60 Germans, 35 Israelis and a handful of other nationalities, were taken to neighboring Congo to escape army-led rioting that has killed more than 45 people since Thursday, including the French ambassador.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing further violence in Zaire, the Bush Administration began efforts Wednesday to evacuate Americans from the troubled Central African nation, where two days of rioting has left the center of the capital in ruins and an estimated 30 people dead. Earlier in the day, the Pentagon announced that Defense Secretary Dick Cheney had authorized a U.S. loan of several C-141 military transport planes to France to ferry more soldiers, supplies and equipment to Zaire.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST and SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After four days of riots and violence in Zaire, reports from diplomats and European evacuees from the large, mineral-rich Central African state paint a picture of widespread destruction and anarchy as more shooting incidents were reported Thursday.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Foreigners fleeing fighting in the capital, Brazzaville, said a private militia had gained the upper hand after four days of street clashes with government forces. What began as an attempt by government forces to disarm members of the 5,000-strong militia had evolved into anarchy and a full-scale battle for control of the city, the witnesses said. In Washington, the State Department ordered the departure from Brazzaville of all nonessential U.S.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton administration reportedly is sending "several hundred" U.S. troops to western Africa to prepare for a possible evacuation of about 650 U.S. citizens from Zaire and has asked dependents of U.S. Embassy personnel to leave the strife-torn Central African nation. Speaking on condition of anonymity, Pentagon sources told the Associated Press that the U.S. forces had already begun their movement toward Africa as part of a "joint task force." They said up to 250 U.S.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Zairian guards evacuated nearly 400 Belgians from riot-torn Zaire on Saturday aboard President Mobutu Sese Seko's personal yacht after telling Belgian commandos not to intervene following two days of fierce rioting. The refugees, mostly Belgian but including about 60 Germans, 35 Israelis and a handful of other nationalities, were taken to neighboring Congo to escape army-led rioting that has killed more than 45 people since Thursday, including the French ambassador.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST and SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After four days of riots and violence in Zaire, reports from diplomats and European evacuees from the large, mineral-rich Central African state paint a picture of widespread destruction and anarchy as more shooting incidents were reported Thursday.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing further violence in Zaire, the Bush Administration began efforts Wednesday to evacuate Americans from the troubled Central African nation, where two days of rioting has left the center of the capital in ruins and an estimated 30 people dead. Earlier in the day, the Pentagon announced that Defense Secretary Dick Cheney had authorized a U.S. loan of several C-141 military transport planes to France to ferry more soldiers, supplies and equipment to Zaire.
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