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NATIONAL
April 26, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
A teenage boy suspected of fatally stabbing his high school classmate at a Connecticut high school just hours before the junior prom is under psychiatric evaluation, the teen's lawyer said Saturday. At the same time, friends of stabbing victim Maren Sanchez mourned her death, sharing memories of a girl they described as an outgoing teen who served as something of a “counselor” for many students and was known for heartfelt chats by her locker. The 16-year-old boy, whose name is being withheld because of his age, will not be in court during Monday's scheduled arraignment, his attorney, Edward J. Gavin, told the Los Angeles Times.
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NATIONAL
April 26, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
A teenage boy suspected of fatally stabbing his high school classmate at a Connecticut high school just hours before the junior prom is under psychiatric evaluation, the teen's lawyer said Saturday. At the same time, friends of stabbing victim Maren Sanchez mourned her death, sharing memories of a girl they described as an outgoing teen who served as something of a “counselor” for many students and was known for heartfelt chats by her locker. The 16-year-old boy, whose name is being withheld because of his age, will not be in court during Monday's scheduled arraignment, his attorney, Edward J. Gavin, told the Los Angeles Times.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2008 | Howard Blume
A new report from the state's legislative analyst castigates California's system for evaluating and improving schools. In particular the report, released Tuesday, cited confusion and conflict between state and federal reforms. According to the analysis, "the state and federal systems form a labyrinth of duplicative and disconnected program requirements that send mixed messages to teachers, parents, schools and districts." The authors also noted that since 1999, officials have invested $2.5 billion in school improvement programs, and yet "more schools in California are deemed in need of improvement today than a decade ago."
SPORTS
April 19, 2014 | By Gary Klein
For at least a few fans, USC's spring-ending scrimmage at the Coliseum was an overwhelming success. One youngster from the crowd passed for a touchdown on a promotional play with the Trojans and an adult caught a pass and sprinted to the end zone on another. However, those were the only touchdowns scored Saturday as USC completed 15 workouts under new Coach Steve Sarkisian and his staff. Before getting too alarmed, it is worth noting that dating to the Pete Carroll era, USC's spring finale has not served as a reliable indicator of fall performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1991
Thanks very much for Edwin Chen's excellent article on the re-evaluation of Big Science projects, which is currently going on across the country ("Big Science Faces Big Troubles," Column One, June 5). Such a re-evaluation is long overdue. Although scientific research is invariably portrayed and justified as serving the cause of mankind, bettering the human race or whatever, two facts are very much in evidence: a) the vast majority of the problems afflicting the human race and the planet are ones which can be solved by applying what we know right now, and b)
OPINION
September 17, 2009
Re "Run the Race to the Top?: California must act to ensure it gets needed federal school funds," and "The initiative uses the wrong means to achieve education reform," Opinion, Sept. 15 In responding to Walt Gardner's Op-Ed article, I believe that test scores are one of the valid measures of a teacher's effectiveness. I just retired after 37 years as a teacher in the public schools. I taught in schools with students whose "bleak situation" was described by Gardner. The fact is, within those schools are good and bad teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2012 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
A 10-year-old boy accused of stabbing a 12-year-old friend to death will be evaluated to determine whether he is competent to stand trial on murder and felony assault charges, a judge said Thursday. The boy, whose name was not released by authorities, fidgeted and cracked his knuckles throughout the hearing, which was his first appearance in court since he allegedly killed Ryan Carter on Monday after the victim had tried to break up a fight. The younger boy, neighbors said, suffered from emotional issues and was prone to bouts of anger, but they expressed shock that he was capable of such violence.
WORLD
June 17, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
U.S. military officials Wednesday damped expectations for quick results from offensives in Afghanistan and played down a year-end review that the Obama administration had portrayed as a major evaluation of the U.S.-led war. "I would not want to overplay the significance of this review," Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, who oversees U.S. forces in the Mideast and Afghanistan, told members of the House Armed Services Committee, referring to plans...
NEWS
November 14, 2010 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON -- Roxanne Brummell has thrived in what many consider the toughest new testing ground for teachers in the nation. The fifth-grade teacher in Washington, D.C., earned a "highly effective" rating under the district's controversial system that rewards -- and sometimes fires -- teachers based in part on their students' progress on standardized tests. In just seven months, she helped boost her students' reading scores by an average of 24%. Brummell's reward: a $20,000 bonus and recognition at district award ceremonies.
OPINION
July 29, 2010
The whole point of establishing a new anti-gang program in Los Angeles two years ago was to finally be able to identify which strategies worked and which didn't. The longstanding L.A. Bridges and the newer Bridges II programs were jettisoned precisely because no one had any way to determine whether they, and the millions of dollars paid to their gang-diversion and intervention contractors, were doing any good. The centerpiece of the new Gang Reduction and Youth Development program was to be a commitment to rigorous, transparent, scientific and verifiable evaluation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A 28-year-old man who worked at a call center inside the Los Angeles Times building was being held for a mental health evaluation Saturday after he allegedly made threatening statements and handed his supervisor a pillowcase containing ammunition rounds, authorities said. The incident prompted a lockdown of The Times building Friday night as police searched the structure. The suspect, Matthew Lowes, is an employee of VXI Global Solutions, which rents space in The Times building. Lowes was reprimanded by his supervisor Friday afternoon and left the building, according to Norma Eisenman, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Police Department.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - Renewal of important expired federal tax benefits for homeowners took a major step forward recently, but the route to final congressional approval is beginning to look longer - and potentially bumpier - than previously expected. Here's why. The Senate Finance Committee overwhelmingly approved a package of tax code goodies that includes a two-year reauthorization of the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act, plus similar extensions for deductions of mortgage insurance premiums and energy-saving improvements to homes.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Tom Petruno
Why bother with a "go-anywhere" mutual fund? For many investors the answer may be that there's no need. If you have a well-diversified portfolio and a truly long-term focus, your asset mix may suit you just fine. Older investors who are more fearful of severe losses, however, may have a different view. Ditto for investors who are looking to put money to work now but are wary with many stocks near record highs and with bond yields depressed. Chris Hauswirth, a principal at investment advisory firm Wetherby Asset Management in San Francisco, said he uses go-anywhere funds for 5% to 10% of some clients' portfolios, as a way to add diversification.
SPORTS
March 29, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
I liked Major League Baseball's decision to dramatically expand its use of instant replay, believing it was time for a sport that is often resistant to change to embrace technology the way the NFL, NBA and NHL have. But after seeing the replay process play out - rather clumsily at times - this spring, I'm less of a fan. The new system requires too many layers of evaluation and communication, and it is sure to disrupt the flow of games. First, the manager, in what amounts to an on-field filibuster, must initiate a discussion with an umpire to give his video coordinator time to review the play to determine whether the call should be challenged.
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir Putin has agreed to a German proposal for international observers to review the tense standoff in Ukraine's Crimea area, a Kremlin news service dispatch indicated Monday. The proposal for a “contact group” of mediating foreign diplomats and an observer delegation to assess Moscow's claims that ethnic Russians are threatened with violence under Ukraine's new leadership was made by German Chancellor Angela Merkel during a late Sunday phone call to Putin, her spokesman told journalists in Berlin on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | Ralph Vartabedian and Maura Dolan
With the state's bullet train project in a legal bind, the California Supreme Court on Wednesday ordered an appeals court to conduct a fast-track review of lower court rulings that have blocked the state's access to $9 billion in public funds needed for the Los Angeles-to-San Francisco line. The order granted Gov. Jerry Brown's administration the expedited legal review it sought. But the high court declined to take up the matter on its own, potentially slowing down the resolution of crucial legal and financial issues for the $68-billion construction project, according to attorneys involved in the case.
OPINION
April 29, 2011 | By Cary Coglianese
The current spending battles in Washington reveal the deep fault lines between the political parties over the size and role of the federal government. That divide also emerges in the parties' rhetoric over the value of government regulation. Republicans attack regulations as overburdensome job killers, while President Obama and fellow Democrats defend them as common-sense rules that protect Americans. When it comes to regulation, though, there is something on which Democrats and Republicans agree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1995 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A court-appointed psychiatrist Thursday added his name to the list of people who say Donna Jean Fleming, the young mother accused of throwing her two young sons and herself off a Long Beach bridge in February, is mentally ill and unfit to stand trial. Part of the letter from Dr. Kaushal Sharma was read at what was to be Fleming's arraignment in Long Beach Superior Court on charges of murder and attempted murder. Despite agreeing with the physician's conclusion that Fleming, 24, was psychotic, paranoid and prone to hallucinations, her attorney, Stephen Pace, requested a second mental evaluation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Air pollution in California has dropped significantly over the last decade, yet about one-third of the population lives in communities where the air does not meet federal health standards, state officials reported Thursday. The evaluation of smog and soot levels was presented at a meeting in Sacramento of the California Air Resources Board, which oversees the state's progress in cleaning air that remains among the dirtiest in the nation. Despite falling 15% to 20% in urban areas since 2003, smog remains above federal health standards in parts of Greater Los Angeles, the San Joaquin Valley, Sacramento and San Diego, the board's report said.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The U.S. government violated the law when it opened millions of acres of the Arctic Ocean to offshore oil drilling, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, possibly delaying plans by companies such as Royal Dutch Shell to drill off the northwest coast of Alaska in the near future. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled that the Interior Department did not properly evaluate the impact of oil development in the Chukchi Sea when it sold more than $2.6 billion in development leases in the environmentally sensitive area in 2008.
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