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Evangelical Environmental Network

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994 | From Religious News Service
After years of focusing strictly on the needs of the human spirit, evangelicals are beginning to be concerned with the human habitat as well. But as they make their way through this new terrain, the path is marked by uncertainty, apprehension and sometimes discord. When evangelicals clash on the environment, the disagreement has more to do with differing views on science or the economy than on theological issues.
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NATIONAL
July 4, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Declaring that caring for the environment is part of following Jesus, a group of 30 evangelical leaders has agreed to work for faith-based environmental activism among the nation's most conservative Christians. The decision to move ahead, made at the end of a two-day conference in Maryland, could begin to reshape environmental politics in the years ahead, those present said.
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NEWS
February 1, 1996 | D'JAMILA SALEM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joining with environmentalists in an unusual political alliance, a coalition of evangelical Christians on Wednesday launched a campaign to keep Republicans in Congress from weakening the Endangered Species Act. The Evangelical Environmental Network, which said it represents more than 1,000 churches nationwide, equated the GOP assault on the endangered species law to a modern-day sinking of Noah's Ark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a sign of growing environmental activism by religious bodies, more than 20 Orange County Episcopal parishes joined with scores from throughout Southern California to launch a yearlong program of unprecedented steps to safeguard the natural world.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Declaring that caring for the environment is part of following Jesus, a group of 30 evangelical leaders has agreed to work for faith-based environmental activism among the nation's most conservative Christians. The decision to move ahead, made at the end of a two-day conference in Maryland, could begin to reshape environmental politics in the years ahead, those present said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a sign of growing environmental activism by religious bodies, the six-county Los Angeles Episcopal Diocese on Saturday launched a yearlong program calling upon its 147 parishes and 85,000 members to take unprecedented steps to safeguard the natural world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a sign of growing environmental activism by religious bodies, more than 20 Orange County Episcopal parishes joined with scores from throughout Southern California to launch a yearlong program of unprecedented steps to safeguard the natural world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1999 | Associated Press
A 10-year, $16-million program to make concern for the environment a fundamental focus of religious life in America has been announced by an umbrella group. The long-term goal of the Leadership of National Religious Partnership for the Environment is to ensure that religious leaders of the next generation make caring for God's creation a priority.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2002 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Theologians have wrestled with some pretty bizarre questions over the centuries, such as "How many angels can dance on the head of a pin?" and "Do hair and fingernails keep growing in heaven?" The latest head-scratcher is "What would Jesus drive?" The traditional answer is "a donkey." But what if Jesus had been born in modern times? Would he choose public transit or a private car? Stick shift or automatic? A sport-utility vehicle roomy enough for all 12 apostles or an economy model?
SCIENCE
December 4, 2007 | Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
If you thought divorce was bad for the kids, you should see what it does to the environment. A study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science found that the resource inefficiency of divorced households resulted in an extra 73 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity use in the U.S. in 2005 -- about 7% of total home use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a sign of growing environmental activism by religious bodies, the six-county Los Angeles Episcopal Diocese on Saturday launched a yearlong program calling upon its 147 parishes and 85,000 members to take unprecedented steps to safeguard the natural world.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | D'JAMILA SALEM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joining with environmentalists in an unusual political alliance, a coalition of evangelical Christians on Wednesday launched a campaign to keep Republicans in Congress from weakening the Endangered Species Act. The Evangelical Environmental Network, which said it represents more than 1,000 churches nationwide, equated the GOP assault on the endangered species law to a modern-day sinking of Noah's Ark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994 | From Religious News Service
After years of focusing strictly on the needs of the human spirit, evangelicals are beginning to be concerned with the human habitat as well. But as they make their way through this new terrain, the path is marked by uncertainty, apprehension and sometimes discord. When evangelicals clash on the environment, the disagreement has more to do with differing views on science or the economy than on theological issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2003 | Steve Harvey
Unholy rollers? The police log of the Los Alamitos News-Enterprise reported that the street-corner sermonizing of a religious zealot in Cypress "caused a disturbance in traffic." I wonder if he was angering SUV drivers by appealing to them to give up the gas-guzzlers. He wouldn't be the first holy man to do so. A pastor who operates the Pennsylvania-based Evangelical Environmental Network launched a "What would Jesus drive?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Across the country, congregations of many faiths are awakening to a kind of earth spirituality rooted in their sacred writings and traditions. Mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics have been among the leaders in the charge, incorporating themes of caring for creation into their prayers, sermons and liturgies.
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