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Evangelical Lutheran Church In America

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1993 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lutherans respect and honor most of the insights of 16th-Century church reformer Martin Luther, but they're likely to cringe in shame at what he said about Jews. Although it was four centuries ago, and many people remain unaware of some of Luther's anti-Jewish tirades, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America is firmly and formally renouncing those attacks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1993 | From Religious News Service
Delegates to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America's Churchwide Assembly are calling on church members to confront the "prejudice, power and privilege" that combine to make up the "sin" of racism. And they overwhelmingly reaffirmed the church's own controversial affirmative action plan aimed at ensuring that at least 10% of the voting members in all church governing bodies are "persons of color" or those whose primary language is other than English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Racism is a sin that remains embedded not only in individuals but in the nation's institutions and social structures, according to a proposed social statement by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Lamenting that "the United States seems far from the day when people of all nations and tongues live in harmony," it calls on churches to name the "white American sin of racism."
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | Reuters
America's largest Lutheran denomination elected its first female bishop, a Midwestern woman who became the second female chosen for such a post in the history of worldwide Lutheranism. The Rev. April Ulring Larson, 42, was chosen late Friday as bishop for a four-year term of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America's synod, or region, based in La Crosse, Wis., the denomination announced Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991 | From Religious News Service
Concerned that a draft version of a report on human sexuality seemed to endorse historic Lutheran prohibitions against extramarital sex, an agency of the Evangelical Lutheran Church has ordered the paper back to the drawing board, hoping to achieve more of a middle course. "There are a large number of people in the Lutheran church who haven't married and probably won't marry," said Ingrid Christensen, board chairman of the denomination's Division for Church and Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1991 | From Religious News Service
Ask and ye shall receive. That is a lesson the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America has learned--a lesson that could prove valuable to the 5.2-million-member denomination, which has run up sizable deficits each fiscal year since its founding in 1988. In August, 1990, 13 congregations had to put their building plans on hold because the church's property and building loan fund had simply run out of available cash. But now, a year later, no one has to wait.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A strong anti-abortion stand by the nation's largest Lutheran denomination should help lead the country out of an "extremist morass" on the issue, the organization's presiding bishop said this week. But Bishop Herbert W. Chilstrom said it was unfortunate that New York's Roman Catholic Cardinal John O'Connor had sent delegates a letter urging them to take a tough stance protecting "the unborn."
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The biennial assembly of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America took a firm stand against abortion, condoning it only as "an option of last resort." The delegates, meeting in Orlando, Fla., voted 905 to 70 for a policy stating that abortion is acceptable only when the life of the mother is endangered, when the fetus is so abnormal it would soon die or in the cases of rape or incest. The delegates also urged U.S. economic pressure on Israel to stop Jewish settlements in Arab territories.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America vowed to pursue Christian unity through "full communion" with other churches. In a "Declaration of Ecumenical Commitment," the biennial assembly in Orlando, Fla., of the 5.2-million-member denomination overwhelmingly voted to work toward holding a common faith, sharing the Lord's Supper and providing for exchange of members and ministers with other Protestants, Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox.
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