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Evelyn Burge

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | SARA CATANIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Packing bandages, antiseptic and other medical supplies, public health nurse Evelyn Burge sets off on her daily rounds, making house calls on people without homes. As she pulls up to her first stop, she is greeted by a small group of homeless men and women eager for attention to their various medical troubles. "I've had doctors treat me like dirt," said Carolyn Caron, a 55-year-old disabled woman, who for the moment lives in a Ventura shelter. "If it wasn't for her, I just wouldn't go for help."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | SARA CATANIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Packing bandages, antiseptic and other medical supplies, public health nurse Evelyn Burge sets off on her daily rounds, making house calls on people without homes. As she pulls up to her first stop, she is greeted by a small group of homeless men and women eager for attention to their various medical troubles. "I've had doctors treat me like dirt," said Carolyn Caron, a 55-year-old disabled woman, who for the moment lives in a Ventura shelter. "If it wasn't for her, I just wouldn't go for help."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1994 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good deeds of good Samaritans nurture the riverbed society and keep it alive. * Food is handed out free every day to river-bottom residents. Clothing is available, often dropped in a nearby parking lot for the homeless to pick through. Dog food is dispensed on Sundays. So is religion. A small band of care givers regularly visits the river-bottom homeless, delivering help and a measure of hope, ministering to the mind, the body and the soul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1995 | SARA CATANIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after rescue workers discovered the body of a homeless man in the storm-ravaged Ventura River, friends of the man mourned his death. William Lee Shubert, 31, was pulled from the river Tuesday afternoon, the only known fatality in Ventura County of the vicious storm that swept through the area. Wednesday, family members gathered at the wood-frame, one-story house in Camarillo where Jacque and Lois Shubert raised William and his six brothers and sisters, friends of the family said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1991 | MAJA RADEVICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The homeless man had come to the Oxnard Salvation Army's health clinic because of chest pains, but he still protested briefly as nurse Evelyn Burge insisted on taking him to the hospital. "If I make an appointment for him, he'll never go," Burge said. "This is a 'now' population. They're worried about what they'll eat tonight, where they'll sleep. They're not thinking about a doctor's appointment two days from now."
NEWS
March 22, 1993 | SARA CATANIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Packing bandages, antiseptic and other medical supplies, public health nurse Evelyn Burge sets off on her daily rounds, making house calls on people without homes. As she pulls up to her first stop, she is greeted by a small group of homeless men and women eager for attention to their various medical troubles. "I've had doctors treat me like dirt," said Carolyn Caron, a 55-year-old disabled woman, who is living in a Ventura shelter. "If it wasn't for her I just wouldn't go for help."
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | CAROL WATSON and JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Haunted by the panicked face of young Adam Bischoff as he was swept away in roiling brown waters the day before, dozens of onlookers made a pilgrimage to the Los Angeles River on Thursday, some unable to believe that the young man is dead. But there, on a sandy berm exposed as the storm receded, were the coroner's investigators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1992 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deadline looms for the Street Sheet, Ventura County's weekly newsletter for the homeless, and editor Marin Williamson is still waiting on her centerpiece story. "It's an imaginary dialogue between a homeless woman and her daughter-in-law, who happens to be a police officer," says Williamson, 51, as she pounds on a computer keyboard in the cramped basement of Ventura's American Red Cross building. She's working on a new feature, "Street Person of the Week."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1994 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Albert Forbes once considered retirement. He even tried it for a while. After all, he is 75. And he had spent nearly 20 years doctoring eyes in East Los Angeles. So he sold his optometry practice 10 years ago, bought a home on the beach in Oxnard and started taking it easy. But the easy life didn't last long. Everywhere he looked--in schools and hospitals and health clinics--there were people who couldn't afford eye care.
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