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Evelyn Glennie

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September 13, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An autobiography may seem rather premature from a 26-year-old, Evelyn Glennie (24 when she wrote it) immediately concedes. But then, how many deaf percussionists are busy releasing CDs on a major label contract and touring to the tune of 100 concerts a season? "I've kept a diary since I was 11," she explains about her book, "Good Vibrations." "I happen to enjoy reading about people, myself, and I felt a real need to do it. It's written in a very lighthearted way, which seemed right at the time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Evelyn Glennie is said to own about 1,800 percussion instruments. She used to haul chunks of her collection along wherever she toured, and her solo appearance at Royce Hall on Thursday night was supposed to have included 60 instruments. Yet this concert ended up with an economy-sized stash: only six instruments per se, not counting a few supplements.
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NEWS
March 28, 2002 | LESLIE GORNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
According to some musicians, hearing is actually a form of touch. Both senses rely on vibrations--the rumbling of a floor during an earthquake, the trembling of an eardrum as a cymbal crashes. That's how Grammy-winning classical percussionist Evelyn Glennie, profoundly deaf since age 11, experiences music during concerts. Those tactile cues, along with a percussionist's dance-like movements, are a more complete package--a way to appreciate music that encompasses multiple senses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2006 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
Thoroughly accessible and almost luridly colorful, Kevin Puts' new Percussion Concerto received its premiere performance Thursday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The Pacific Symphony, conducted by music director Carl St.Clair, hosted the soloist, the formidable Evelyn Glennie. This was a most impressive first hearing, solidly and engagingly performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Touch the Sound" begins with a close-up of an enormous standing gong being struck. The reverberations start low, but as the camera pulls back they grow exponentially and seem to explode through an entire building with terrifying force. In the world of Evelyn Glennie, the woman at the gong, sound has power.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2006 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
Thoroughly accessible and almost luridly colorful, Kevin Puts' new Percussion Concerto received its premiere performance Thursday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The Pacific Symphony, conducted by music director Carl St.Clair, hosted the soloist, the formidable Evelyn Glennie. This was a most impressive first hearing, solidly and engagingly performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Evelyn Glennie is said to own about 1,800 percussion instruments. She used to haul chunks of her collection along wherever she toured, and her solo appearance at Royce Hall on Thursday night was supposed to have included 60 instruments. Yet this concert ended up with an economy-sized stash: only six instruments per se, not counting a few supplements.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was definitely not your usual Virtuoso Series recital, Wednesday at Hollywood Bowl, although it was certainly virtuosic. Evelyn Glennie, the hearing-impaired Scottish percussion evangelist who made her Bowl debut on the Fireworks Finale last summer, returned with one of the freshest, most stimulating Bowl programs in recent memory. Note, however, that this will be a minority report.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Evelyn Glennie amazes as she coaxes music out of just about any surface she can hit, strike, tap, brush or stroke. But just how this phenomenal Scottish percussionist manages to make music out of all this -- considering that she is profoundly deaf -- has been something of a mystery. That mystery is why "Rivers and Tides" director-cinematographer-editor Thomas Riedelsheimer says he devoted three years to his new documentary about Glennie.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Touch the Sound" begins with a close-up of an enormous standing gong being struck. The reverberations start low, but as the camera pulls back they grow exponentially and seem to explode through an entire building with terrifying force. In the world of Evelyn Glennie, the woman at the gong, sound has power.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Evelyn Glennie amazes as she coaxes music out of just about any surface she can hit, strike, tap, brush or stroke. But just how this phenomenal Scottish percussionist manages to make music out of all this -- considering that she is profoundly deaf -- has been something of a mystery. That mystery is why "Rivers and Tides" director-cinematographer-editor Thomas Riedelsheimer says he devoted three years to his new documentary about Glennie.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | LESLIE GORNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
According to some musicians, hearing is actually a form of touch. Both senses rely on vibrations--the rumbling of a floor during an earthquake, the trembling of an eardrum as a cymbal crashes. That's how Grammy-winning classical percussionist Evelyn Glennie, profoundly deaf since age 11, experiences music during concerts. Those tactile cues, along with a percussionist's dance-like movements, are a more complete package--a way to appreciate music that encompasses multiple senses.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was definitely not your usual Virtuoso Series recital, Wednesday at Hollywood Bowl, although it was certainly virtuosic. Evelyn Glennie, the hearing-impaired Scottish percussion evangelist who made her Bowl debut on the Fireworks Finale last summer, returned with one of the freshest, most stimulating Bowl programs in recent memory. Note, however, that this will be a minority report.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An autobiography may seem rather premature from a 26-year-old, Evelyn Glennie (24 when she wrote it) immediately concedes. But then, how many deaf percussionists are busy releasing CDs on a major label contract and touring to the tune of 100 concerts a season? "I've kept a diary since I was 11," she explains about her book, "Good Vibrations." "I happen to enjoy reading about people, myself, and I felt a real need to do it. It's written in a very lighthearted way, which seemed right at the time.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
Compiled by Daniel Cariaga. Music TODAY Rachmaninoff International Piano Competition (Norton Simon Museum Auditorium, 411 W. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, [213] 383-3528). Second Round. 1 and 7 p.m. $20-$35. Also, Fri. and Sat., 1 and 7 p.m. Hutchins Violin Consort; Allan Vogel, oboe (Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Drive, Irvine, [949] 854-4646). Varied program. 8 p.m. $22-$30.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Performing Arts Center has added cabaret and Broadway-style nightclub performances to an expanded 1997-98 Founders Hall subscription season. A center spokesman announced today that Eartha Kitt, Barbara Cook and Weslia Whitfield will headline a newly created cabaret series; Melba Moore and Carol Lawrence will star in a new Broadway Songbook series.
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