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HEALTH
July 31, 2006 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight can be reached at kvoightla@aol.com.
Dynamic strength is the type of strength you use in everyday activities such as standing, lifting, carrying, bending and twisting. It is often referred to as "strength in action." This move, which focuses on dynamic strength, trains many muscles in your body to work together as a unit. -- Karen Voight 1 Begin in a plank (or the top of a push-up) position. Form a straight line, with your body balancing evenly between your hands and toes.
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SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
It's not enough for people to get regular moderate exercise as they age. Researchers say it's also important not to spend the rest your time sitting too much. In fact, for every hour of sedentary behavior, the odds were 46% greater that people older than 60 would have some disability in ordinary skills such as getting around the house and feeding themselves, according to the study published Wednesday in the Journal of Physical Activity & Health. Being sedentary will lead to problems “independent of time spent in moderate or vigorous activity,” concluded the researchers, from Northwestern's Feinberg Medical School, Rush University Medical Center, Harvard School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
For at least a decade, Karin Apollonia Muller has been making savvy photographs that consider the disquieting contradictions of ordinary experience, a project for which Southern California has been her muse. Muller divides her time between Los Angeles and Germany, where she was born (in Heidelberg) in 1963. Perhaps it takes an outsider to see a place with fresh eyes, because she understands the perplexing city in ways that deeply resonate.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Although it has some of the new-colt wobbliness common to newborn series, "The Fosters," which premieres Monday on ABC Family, gets on its legs pretty quickly. Created by the alliterative team of Bradley Bredeweg and Peter Paige, whose main previous writing credit is the short-lived CW reality series "Fly Girls" - a peek back into the archives reminds me that I did not like it much at all - and with Jennifer Lopez as a celebrity executive producer, it is a blended-family series that leaves no stone unblended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Recently, I was jarred to read an essay that ran on the front page of this newspaper two decades ago. "Suddenly, I am scared to be Asian," the author wrote. "More specifically, I am afraid of being mistaken for Korean. " Those words were mine, a fourth-generation Chinese American, written as large swaths of L.A. were smoldering. I'm sure my remarks made some readers suspect I had slept through Political Correctness 101. Had the violence racking the city really rubbed me so raw? It's easy to forget how confounding the events of that spring were for Los Angeles.
FOOD
September 12, 1996 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Searching for romance? TV chef Nick Stellino knows how to find it. Of course, Stellino thinks of romance in the broader sense--injecting magic into everyday life--not just hearts and flowers. "I call romantic a meal at which the whole family sits together and shares their stories of the day," says Stellino, star of the PBS cooking show "Cucina Amore," which begins its new season Saturday at 11 a.m. on KCET (Channel 28). That's the way it was as he grew up in Sicily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2003 | Joel Rubin, Daren Briscoe and Lee Romney, Times Staff Writers
On the short cul-de-sac in Commerce that runs alongside the railroad tracks, fresh lumber mingles with the detritus from the homes. A roll of toilet paper. A lampshade. A child's Superman bedsheets. The residents of Davie Avenue are accustomed to freight traffic and Metrolink trains rumbling past. Then an out-of-control train derailed Friday afternoon. Seconds before the crash, they had formed a tableau of everyday life.
NEWS
July 15, 2002 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
THE WHORE'S CHILD And Other Stories by Richard Russo Alfred A. Knopf 272 pp., $24 * Starting in 1986 with "Mohawk," set in upstate New York, Richard Russo has made a name for himself writing big novels about small places. His most recent, "Empire Falls," about a dying mill town in Maine, won him the Pulitzer Prize earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2001 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Visionary Austrian poet Rainer Maria Rilke is certainly not known for his dramas. The few plays Rilke did write are seldom, if ever, produced today. "Everyday Life" at the Pacific Resident Theatre is a welcome opportunity to see a full-fledged Rilke drama in all its glory and excess.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Joe Restivo, a comedian and character actor who performed on the national comedy club circuit for many years with a stand-up routine that reveled in the absurdities of everyday life, has died. He was 60. Restivo, who was a resident of Valley Village, died Monday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank after a long battle with cancer, said his wife, Maryanne. His comedy was filled with what has been described as middle-class angst.
OPINION
December 30, 2012
Re “ A fateful dance with death ,” Dec. 23 This article is both gripping and compelling, and brings added emphasis to the cliche about life being too short. I love the attitude this young man had about life. It is wise beyond his years, and without question a brave and admirable one. The last sentence was amazing to me: “It's never too early and it's never too late. Everyone's life is borrowed.” Thank you for writing this. Olakunle Arowolo Long Beach I feel the article about a young man's bout with poverty and cancer and his eventual death was in very poor taste, and definitely did not warrant being a top story on the front page of a major metropolitan newspaper such as The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
The lead character in Jim Unger's offbeat cartoon panel "Herman" is a rumpled, middle-aged everyman, with a bulging belly and a potato-sized nose, dealing with the frustrations and absurdities of everyday life. In one panel, Unger's lumpy hero wears an apron and washes the dishes as his wife glowers over his shoulder. The caption says, "It's one small step for a man, one giant leap toward a divorce. " The award-winning British-born cartoonist had a good idea why his widely syndicated cartoon was so popular.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Recently, I was jarred to read an essay that ran on the front page of this newspaper two decades ago. "Suddenly, I am scared to be Asian," the author wrote. "More specifically, I am afraid of being mistaken for Korean. " Those words were mine, a fourth-generation Chinese American, written as large swaths of L.A. were smoldering. I'm sure my remarks made some readers suspect I had slept through Political Correctness 101. Had the violence racking the city really rubbed me so raw? It's easy to forget how confounding the events of that spring were for Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Last fall, a state inspector strode into Great Beginnings preschool and declared the tree house and climbing structure too high. They would have to come down or be surrounded by extra padding. The metal ladder to the playhouse, which had been there 30 years, could pinch the children, said Beverly Wright-Chrystal, a state child care licensing representative. Also, a log worn smooth by generations of boys and girls playing horsy and hide-and-go-seek would have to be sanded and painted because of a potential "splinter hazard," Wright-Chrystal determined.
SPORTS
November 20, 2011 | Eric Sondheimer
Thirty-five years ago, when I had just graduated from high school and was starting out in journalism, one of my first assignments was covering City Section cross-country. I had to copy the names of the top three finishers in each league race and write a short story about what happened. Even then, I was curious about these crazy high school kids who ran 50 to 60 miles a week, didn't receive much attention but loved the challenge. So there I was last week at the City finals at Pierce College, looking for a little inspiration.
WORLD
October 22, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
There's the grown son bridging the distance with his alcoholic father, an old woman's girlhood memories of working in her grandfather's dumpling restaurant, a student's search for an inspiring former teacher. Like pages ripped from a diary, they're personal stories about love, loss and just coping with everyday life in this crowded and stressful society. But these private thoughts are presented in a public place: The short tales, signed by their authors, are part of a new storytelling program on Seoul's Metropolitan Subway System.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frederick Mosteller, 89, who founded Harvard University's statistics department and used mathematical theories to explain everyday concerns, from healthcare to the World Series, died Sunday at a nursing home in Falls Church, Va. The Washington Post reported the cause of death as sepsis, a toxic condition resulting from the spread of bacteria or their toxic products through the body after an infection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | HOLLY MYERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first thing to confront the viewer in Jack Pierson's current exhibition at Regen Projects is a startlingly visceral and intimate accusation, scrawled on a wall in angry black paint: "I left all the love I had for you in a locker at the Hollywood Greyhound Station hacked up in a plastic bag." Evoking an image that is difficult to put out of the mind, the phrase embodies the exhibition's peculiar balance of tenderness and sordidness.
HEALTH
April 18, 2011 | By Margaret Finnegan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My little bit of a nervous breakdown started 10 years ago, when my daughter — then five — was diagnosed with epilepsy. After six weeks of smiling through neurologist appointments, EEGs, blood tests and boatloads of worry, I started having panic attacks, which are aptly named. They feel like total, uncontrollable panic. Mine started with a tingling in my head and quickly spread to tunnel vision, sweaty palms, thumping heartbeat and the belief that I was about to die. One panic attack invites many, and in the weeks to come I had them in stores, at home, in the day, in the night.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
Take down four or five streetlights, remove a scattering of TV antennas, scrape off the asphalt from twisty narrow streets, and the Calabrian mountainside village of Caulonia would look virtually as it did in medieval times. Caulonia and its environs are the setting for native Calabrian Michelangelo Frammartino's enthralling "Le Quattro Volte" (The Four Lives), inspired by the region's great philosopher Pythagoras' belief in four-fold transmigration, which holds that the soul is passed from human to animal to vegetable to mineral.
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