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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990
As a near-pacifist, I never thought I would be agreeing with two ex-Joint Chiefs of Staff. But Jones and Crowe are absolutely right when they advise patience with Saddam Hussein to give the economic sanctions time to take effect. Their warning that a first strike against Iraq would only deepen anti-U.S. sentiment in the Arab world, create new tensions and strain the international alliance against Iraq should be taken to heart by both President Bush and Congress. PAT REIF Los Angeles
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March 28, 2002 | Associated Press
Retired Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is recovering well from a fall but will need spinal cord surgery, Walter Reed Army Medical Center said Wednesday. Shelton "is showing some gradual improvement" and isn't having any problems with his speech or breathing, a hospital statement said. "He is now able to stand with assistance but is still experiencing weakness in his right leg and both arms," the hospital said.
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October 19, 1985 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
A controversial proposal by the Senate Armed Services Committee staff to overhaul civilian and military operations of the Pentagon received the qualified endorsement Friday of a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The retired officer, Gen. David C. Jones of the Air Force, said in an interview that the 645-page document "clearly illustrates the great difficulty we've had in military operations where there is a strong need for interservice actions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990
Your editorial ("Bush Sends a Clear Signal to Baghdad," Dec. 1) posed the question as to how Hussein can "negotiate a face-saving retreat from Kuwait and avoid war." This is an equally vexing question for the Bush Administration, which, like Hussein, has painted itself in a corner by insisting on complete withdrawal before negotiations can begin. What may be a face-saving retreat for both sides is this: Hussein withdraws all his troops from Kuwait and allows the restoration of the Kuwait government, as the U.N. resolutions demand.
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