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NATIONAL
September 24, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A Texas inmate whose appeals have three times spared him the death penalty is again scheduled for execution Tuesday. Cleve Foster, 48, was sentenced to die for his part in the abduction and killing of a 30-year-old Sudanese woman near Fort Worth in 2002. He would be the ninth Texas inmate executed this year, the 486 th since the state began giving lethal injections in 1982. His death would follow that of Texas inmate Robert Wayne Harris, 40, of Dallas; Harris was executed Thursday after his last-minute appeals were rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court.
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NATIONAL
September 15, 2011 | By David Savage, Washington Bureau
The U.S. Supreme Court stopped Texas officials Thursday evening from executing a Houston murderer who was sentenced to die after jurors were told he posed a greater danger to public safety because he is black. The justices acted on an emergency appeal after Texas Gov. Rick Perry and state judges refused to intervene. The high court's brief order said the "stay of execution of sentence of death … is granted" while the justices decide whether to review the case of Duane Edward Buck.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Kimberly McCarthy was put to death Wednesday, the 500th person Texas has executed in the 37 years since the death penalty was reinstated. The former occupational therapist was convicted and sentenced to death in 1998 for the beating and stabbing death of her 71-year-old neighbor, Dorothy Booth, during a robbery. McCarthy, 52, was pronounced dead at 6:37 p.m., 20 minutes after receiving a dose of pentobarbital, according to the Associated Press. With her last words, she thanked her minister and her family, but did not mention her victim.
WORLD
February 8, 2010 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi
The defendant met with his lawyer once for 15 minutes before he was sentenced to death and hanged. When the lawyer complained to authorities, they ignored her. When she tried to enter the courtroom where he was being tried, they threatened her with arrest. And when she spoke out publicly at what she described as a gross miscarriage of justice, they shut off her cellphone. "Unfortunately, despite repeated warnings, you have kept contacts with counter-revolutionary media and for two months from today your cellphone will be cut off," read a text message she received.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
In one way, "Place of Execution," which premieres Sunday on PBS' "Masterpiece Contemporary," is a typical "cozy" mystery. There is a manor house involved and an assortment of colorful locals who may or may not have committed murder. But the story, based on the book by Val McDermid, is more ambitious than that: In 1963, 13-year-old Alison Carter (Poppy Goodburn) walked away from that manor house and disappeared. The image of a beautiful young girl vanishing from a tiny, picaresque English village surrounded by the requisite but still dramatic wind-swept moor captivates George Bennett (Lee Ingleby)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994
The execution of John Wayne Gacy (May 10) was a sad spectacle. People marched the streets of Chicago demanding Gacy's execution, a prosecutor declared that it would be "a privilege to see him draw his last breath," and law enforcement officers threw a party to celebrate the extinguishment of life. These people have succumbed to hatred, becoming killers just like Gacy. Gandhi said that "an eye for an eye makes us all blind." We need to open our eyes and see that state-sanctioned killing cheapens the value of life for all of us. ROBERT M. MYERS Sherman Oaks What a strange world we live in!
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court today blocked the execution of a Sikh convicted of assassinating Prime Minister Indira Gandhi and ordered the president to reconsider the man's request for clemency. The order effectively prevented the execution of a second man convicted in the 1984 assassination, a defense attorney said. A five-judge panel said the constitution allows President Ramaswami Venkataraman to examine the case and decide whether a pardon is warranted.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - A federal judge in Houston on Monday stayed the execution of a Texas man and granted him a competency hearing days before he was to be put to death for the abduction, rape and strangulation of a 12-year-old girl. Soon after the ruling, the Texas Attorney General's Office filed a notice of appeal with the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. A spokesman for the attorney general declined to comment. Christina Neal was snatched as she walked home on June 21, 2000, in Montgomery County, about 60 miles north of Houston, according to the attorney general's summary of the case . Investigators became suspicious of a neighbor, Jonathan Green, after they learned he had been burning trash soon after the girl's disappearance.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The execution of a man convicted of murder was blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court pending a review of his claim that mentally retarded inmates should not be put to death. Attorneys for the 51-year-old Alabama man sought to block his execution until the high court decides in a North Carolina case if it is constitutional to execute the mentally retarded. A ruling in the North Carolina case is expected in the fall. The court blocked the execution of Glenn William Holladay, scheduled for 12:01 a.m.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2010 | By David G. Savage
With just an hour to spare, the Supreme Court blocked the Wednesday evening execution in Texas of convicted murderer Hank Skinner, who maintains his innocence and who has sought DNA testing of key evidence for a decade. The justices issued a stay of execution and said they wanted more time to consider Skinner's appeal. It will probably be several weeks before the court decides whether to hear his case. Last year, the court ruled 5 to 4 that the Constitution does not give convicts the right to demand DNA testing of crime-scene evidence.
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