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NEWS
July 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Horace Franklin Dunkins Jr., a mildly retarded man, was executed in Alabama's electric chair early today for the 1980 rape-murder of a woman after the U.S. Supreme Court twice turned down last-minute appeals. Late Thursday, the Supreme Court twice voted, 7 to 2, to deny a stay of execution. Justices William J. Brennan and Thurgood Marshall, who oppose the death penalty in all circumstances, voted to spare the life of Dunkins, 28.
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NEWS
April 26, 2002 | Associated Press
Gov. Donald Siegelman signed a law Thursday making lethal injection the primary method of execution in Alabama, leaving Nebraska as the only state exclusively using the electric chair. Beginning July 1, condemned inmates in Alabama will die by injection unless they choose the electric chair. Siegelman said the change was a precaution in case the Supreme Court rules the electric chair is cruel and unusual punishment. Prosecutors backed the change.
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NEWS
June 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The execution of a man convicted of murder was blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court pending a review of his claim that mentally retarded inmates should not be put to death. Attorneys for the 51-year-old Alabama man sought to block his execution until the high court decides in a North Carolina case if it is constitutional to execute the mentally retarded. A ruling in the North Carolina case is expected in the fall. The court blocked the execution of Glenn William Holladay, scheduled for 12:01 a.m.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The execution of a man convicted of murder was blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court pending a review of his claim that mentally retarded inmates should not be put to death. Attorneys for the 51-year-old Alabama man sought to block his execution until the high court decides in a North Carolina case if it is constitutional to execute the mentally retarded. A ruling in the North Carolina case is expected in the fall. The court blocked the execution of Glenn William Holladay, scheduled for 12:01 a.m.
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | Associated Press
Gov. Donald Siegelman signed a law Thursday making lethal injection the primary method of execution in Alabama, leaving Nebraska as the only state exclusively using the electric chair. Beginning July 1, condemned inmates in Alabama will die by injection unless they choose the electric chair. Siegelman said the change was a precaution in case the Supreme Court rules the electric chair is cruel and unusual punishment. Prosecutors backed the change.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After 16 years of proclaiming his innocence, a former Ku Klux Klansman confessed to killing a black teenager, according to a minister who met with the death row inmate before he was executed. The Rev. Bob Smith mentioned the confession at Henry Francis Hays' funeral. Hays, 42, was executed in Alabama's electric chair early Friday for the 1981 slaying. Smith said Hays offered a tearful 40-minute account of 19-year-old Michael Donald's abduction, beating and strangulation.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Fob James refused to block the execution in Atmore, Ala., early today of Henry Francis Hays, a member of the Ku Klux Klan who killed a 19-year-old black man in a case that ultimately bankrupted the United Klans of America, the klan faction that had incited the crime. Hays, 42, was convicted in the 1981 slaying of Michael Donald, who was abducted from a Mobile street. Prosecutors said the random slaying was ordered by klan leaders "to show klan strength in Alabama."
NEWS
May 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
A man who killed a widow and stole her Christmas presents was executed in Alabama's electric chair early Friday as inmates in nearby cells protested and one yelled: "Murderers, murderers." Michael Lindsey, 28, was pronounced dead by two doctors at Holman Prison near Atmore. The execution was the fourth in Alabama and the 111th in the nation since the U.S. Supreme Court allowed states to resume use of the death penalty in 1976. Lindsey was sentenced to death for the 1981 stabbing and shooting death of Rosemary Zimlich Rutland, 64, of Mobile.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
In one of his final acts in office, Gov. Forrest "Fob" James Jr. commuted the death sentence of a woman convicted of killing a 13-year-old girl who was injected with drain cleaner, shot and thrown into a canyon. James gave no reason for commuting 34-year-old Judith Ann Neelley's sentence to life in prison. Neelley was convicted of the 1982 sex-torture killing of Lisa Ann Millican.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | From Associated Press
Three convicted killers went quietly to their deaths Friday while a fourth received a last-minute stay on the busiest day for the death penalty since the Supreme Court allowed states to resume executions in 1976, officials said. Wayne Eugene Ritter, 33, convicted in the murder of a pawnbroker, died in Alabama's electric chair. Pierre Dale Selby, 34, convicted in the "hi-fi" torture-murders of three people and the maiming of two others, was executed by lethal injection in Utah.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on a 5-4 vote cleared the way Tuesday for the electrocution of an Alabama murderer, despite his lawyer's claim that this "antiquated" method of execution is both horribly cruel and now unusual. Alabama is one of only three states that still uses the electric chair, and it soon may stand alone. Most states, including California, use lethal injections to carry out the death penalty. Georgia and Nebraska also still rely on the electric chair.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
In one of his final acts in office, Gov. Forrest "Fob" James Jr. commuted the death sentence of a woman convicted of killing a 13-year-old girl who was injected with drain cleaner, shot and thrown into a canyon. James gave no reason for commuting 34-year-old Judith Ann Neelley's sentence to life in prison. Neelley was convicted of the 1982 sex-torture killing of Lisa Ann Millican.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After 16 years of proclaiming his innocence, a former Ku Klux Klansman confessed to killing a black teenager, according to a minister who met with the death row inmate before he was executed. The Rev. Bob Smith mentioned the confession at Henry Francis Hays' funeral. Hays, 42, was executed in Alabama's electric chair early Friday for the 1981 slaying. Smith said Hays offered a tearful 40-minute account of 19-year-old Michael Donald's abduction, beating and strangulation.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Fob James refused to block the execution in Atmore, Ala., early today of Henry Francis Hays, a member of the Ku Klux Klan who killed a 19-year-old black man in a case that ultimately bankrupted the United Klans of America, the klan faction that had incited the crime. Hays, 42, was convicted in the 1981 slaying of Michael Donald, who was abducted from a Mobile street. Prosecutors said the random slaying was ordered by klan leaders "to show klan strength in Alabama."
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | Associated Press
A man who hired two men to kill his pregnant wife was executed early Friday in Alabama's electric chair after he prayed and asked her family for forgiveness. "If this is what it takes for there to be healing in their lives, so be it," said Larry Gene Heath. Heath, 40, made no final attempt to appeal his sentence for the 1981 slaying of Rebecca Heath, who was nine months pregnant.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Arthur James Julius, turning both thumbs up as a "goodby to the world," was executed early today in Alabama's electric chair for raping and murdering his cousin while free on an eight-hour pass from prison in 1978. Julius, 42, died almost nonchalantly at 12:21 a.m. inside the Holman Prison execution chamber, wearing a white sweat suit, flip-flop sandals and a purple ribbon given to him by an anti-capital punishment group.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on a 5-4 vote cleared the way Tuesday for the electrocution of an Alabama murderer, despite his lawyer's claim that this "antiquated" method of execution is both horribly cruel and now unusual. Alabama is one of only three states that still uses the electric chair, and it soon may stand alone. Most states, including California, use lethal injections to carry out the death penalty. Georgia and Nebraska also still rely on the electric chair.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Arthur James Julius, turning both thumbs up as a "goodby to the world," was executed early today in Alabama's electric chair for raping and murdering his cousin while free on an eight-hour pass from prison in 1978. Julius, 42, died almost nonchalantly at 12:21 a.m. inside the Holman Prison execution chamber, wearing a white sweat suit, flip-flop sandals and a purple ribbon given to him by an anti-capital punishment group.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
An inmate who was married last week in a prison ceremony was executed Friday in Alabama's electric chair for the 1977 pipe-bomb killing of an 11-year-old girl. Herbert Lee Richardson, 43, was convicted in the death of Rena Mae Callins of Dothan, who was killed on the porch of her home when she picked up a pipe bomb and it detonated. He contended that the bomb was not meant to explode but only to scare the girl's family. The girl's aunt had broken off a relationship with Richardson.
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