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Executions North Carolina

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NEWS
March 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
A man who stabbed his girlfriend to death with a knife and a broken broomstick was put to death by injection Friday. Willie Ervin Fisher, 39, was pronounced dead at 9:21 p.m., Corrections Department spokeswoman Tracy Little said. Earlier in the day, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block Fisher's execution. A state judge late Thursday had delayed the execution, then set for 2 a.m. Friday, saying Gov. Mike Easley might have had a conflict of interest when he denied Fisher clemency.
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NATIONAL
March 7, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual development, the North Carolina Department of Corrections sued the state's medical board Tuesday, asserting that the board's threat to discipline doctors participating in executions had prevented the state from getting a physician to be present at lethal-injection executions. The suit was filed in Raleigh the same day that Superior Court Judge Donald W.
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NEWS
November 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. commuted a convicted killer's death sentence to life in prison without parole Tuesday, hours before he was to be executed. Hunt said he had questions about whether the condemned man--who represented himself--got a fair trial. It was the second time in his 16 years as governor that Hunt, a Democrat, commuted a death sentence. Hunt is leaving office in January; he was barred by law from seeking reelection. Marcus Carter, 32, was scheduled to die by injection at 2 a.m.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
A man who stabbed his girlfriend to death with a knife and a broken broomstick was put to death by injection Friday. Willie Ervin Fisher, 39, was pronounced dead at 9:21 p.m., Corrections Department spokeswoman Tracy Little said. Earlier in the day, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block Fisher's execution. A state judge late Thursday had delayed the execution, then set for 2 a.m. Friday, saying Gov. Mike Easley might have had a conflict of interest when he denied Fisher clemency.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
North Carolina executed Harvey Lee Green Jr., a minister's son, by lethal injection, making him the first African American to be put to death since the state reinstated the death penalty in 1977. Green was executed at Central Prison in Raleigh despite calls by four of the state's black political leaders for Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. to delay the execution and allow Green's lawyers access to the state's investigative and prosecutorial files. Green was pronounced dead at 2:16 a.m.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual development, the North Carolina Department of Corrections sued the state's medical board Tuesday, asserting that the board's threat to discipline doctors participating in executions had prevented the state from getting a physician to be present at lethal-injection executions. The suit was filed in Raleigh the same day that Superior Court Judge Donald W.
OPINION
April 24, 2006 | Jamie Fellner, JAMIE FELLNER is director of the U.S. program at Human Rights Watch and the co-author of "So Long as They Die: Lethal Injections in the United States."
IT IS EASY to understand why lethal injection has become the most frequently used method of execution in the United States. The procedure yields no gruesome spectacle of bodies bursting into flame in electric chairs, twitching at the end of gallows ropes, convulsing from lethal gas. Instead, lethal injection executions look reassuringly like a medical procedure: The prisoner is strapped to a gurney, injected with drugs and dies.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A judge Thursday blocked two executions in North Carolina, creating a de facto moratorium on capital punishment in the state until it changes its lethal injection procedure. The ruling by Superior Court Judge Donald W. Stephens in Raleigh means that 11 states, including California, have now halted executions stemming from challenges to lethal injection.
OPINION
November 7, 2005 | David Margolick, DAVID MARGOLICK, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, is the author of "Beyond Glory: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink" (Knopf, 2005).
SOMETIME IN the 1930s, a black inmate on death row in a Southern state is asphyxiated in its gas chamber. As he breathes in the fatal fumes -- and as observers watch from behind a thick pane of glass -- he cries out: "Save me, Joe Louis! Save me, Joe Louis!" The story has been told ever since, usually to illustrate Louis' near-messianic status in a black America that had little else going for it in the years before World War II. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was among those telling it.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. commuted a convicted killer's death sentence to life in prison without parole Tuesday, hours before he was to be executed. Hunt said he had questions about whether the condemned man--who represented himself--got a fair trial. It was the second time in his 16 years as governor that Hunt, a Democrat, commuted a death sentence. Hunt is leaving office in January; he was barred by law from seeking reelection. Marcus Carter, 32, was scheduled to die by injection at 2 a.m.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
North Carolina executed Harvey Lee Green Jr., a minister's son, by lethal injection, making him the first African American to be put to death since the state reinstated the death penalty in 1977. Green was executed at Central Prison in Raleigh despite calls by four of the state's black political leaders for Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. to delay the execution and allow Green's lawyers access to the state's investigative and prosecutorial files. Green was pronounced dead at 2:16 a.m.
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