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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
The chief executive of Orange County's toll road agency has agreed to resign after less than one year on the job. Neil Peterson, who was hired in May, was put on administrative leave in February after coming under fire for spending thousands of dollars without public scrutiny because of a provision that allowed him to approve certain contracts without board approval. Lisa Telles, a spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies, declined to say why Peterson had decided to resign.
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OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Turley
Recently, a bizarre scene unfolded on the floor of the House of Representatives that would have shocked the framers of the Constitution. In his State of the Union address, President Obama announced that he had decided to go it alone in areas where Congress refused to act to his satisfaction. In a system of shared powers, one would expect an outcry or at least stony silence when a president promised to circumvent the legislative branch. Instead, many senators and representatives erupted in rapturous applause; they seemed delighted at the notion of a president assuming unprecedented and unchecked powers at their expense.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Strive as one might for objectivity, certain shows come equipped with viewer expectations. So when Denis Leary announced that USA would be debuting his comedic accompaniment to "Rescue Me," a natural reaction, at least among Leary fans, would have been "Yay. " Then, when the first episode of "Sirens," which premieres Thursday, turned out to be one long (literally and figuratively) penis joke, an equally natural reaction might have been "Gaack. " Which is no doubt why USA sent three episodes for review.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Meg James
Veteran publishing executive Jack Griffin has been named chief executive of the new Tribune Publishing Co., leading a group of eight newspapers including the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune. The publishing chain is being spun off as a separately traded public company by Chicago-based Tribune Co., which plans to retain ownership of its TV stations and other properties. The separation is expected to happen this summer. Eddy Hartenstein, who has been publisher of The Times since August 2008, will become chairman of Tribune Publishing, a non-executive role.
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Perhaps it's not a big surprise that "12 Years a Slave," the acclaimed movie based on the true story of a free black man who was sold into slavery in the 1840s, won the Academy Award for best picture. It had already won critical acclaim and praise for its lead actors, director and writer (all of whom were nominated for Oscars as well). Besides, as Ellen DeGeneres, the host of the show, joked at the beginning of the evening, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voters had only two options: Either they could bestow their highest honor on "12 Years a Slave," or they were all racists.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By Eugene Kontorovich
President Obama's proclaimed strategy to "bypass Congress" — most conspicuously his broad rewriting of the Affordable Care Act — has given unusual prominence to a fairly arcane legal doctrine: standing. Standing is what is preventing a potential blizzard of litigation against the president's unilateral decrees, and ironically, it's a doctrine liberal jurists have long decried. To challenge the government in federal court, it isn't enough to simply believe that the government's conduct is illegal or even unconstitutional.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
A business executive who stole nearly $400,000 from the rock band Pearl Jam was sentenced Friday in Washington state to 14 months in prison. Rickey Goodrich, former chief financial officer for Pearl Jam's management company, pleaded guilty in December to six counts of first-degree theft "for using company accounts to pay personal debts and fund lavish family vacations, spa treatments, life insurance and pricey California wines," according ...
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments about a Florida man, Freddie Lee Hall, who faces execution for a 1978 murder. Hall is intellectually incapable of understanding the arguments, but the state of Florida says that it has the right to execute him nevertheless, in a case that spotlights both the barbarity and the absurdity of the death penalty. This page has a long history of opposing capital punishment on the grounds of morality, overwhelming evidence of its misapplication and public expense, among other things.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
Avonne Penaflor and Anna Lim entered the doors of the Sriracha factory in Irwindale, took a deep breath and started to giggle. They had caught wind of an odor that has allegedly inflamed respiratory conditions, launched lawsuits and made legions of fans hungry. "It's very nice, actually," said Lim, 38, of Azusa. Huy Fong Foods, the creator of Sriracha hot sauce, has been closed to the public for more than 30 years, fearing that competitors would steal trade secrets. But after months of Irwindale residents and city officials accusing the sauce maker of flooding their city with an offensive spicy odor, the notoriously private company has thrown open its doors.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A top Google executive has denied reports that said the Silicon Valley tech giant made a $10-billion bid to purchase WhatsApp, the messaging service that was recently acquired by Facebook. Last week, Facebook announced that it had agreed to pay $19 billion for WhatsApp, an app with 450 million users. Soon after, reports surfaced that said Google had also made an offer to buy the popular startup. Citing two unnamed sources, Fortune said Google bid $10 billion. That report was backed up by The Information, which said Google offered WhatsApp millions of dollars just to be notified if any other companies also tried to bid for the app. PHOTOS: Five ways the Samsung Gear 2 is better than its predecessor At the time of the reports, Google declined to comment, but at the Mobile World Congress conference in Barcelona, Spain, this week, the head of the company's Chrome and Android divisions denied the WhatsApp reports.
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