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Executive Orders

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OPINION
February 21, 2014
Re "Imperial, shrinking president," Opinion, Feb. 18 As Jonah Goldberg insinuates, what we all learned in fifth-grade civics class about the "three branches of government producing checks and balances" now appears doubtful. Something of an honor system must operate to keep President Obama and Congress on the constitutional level. Obama contends that Congress has granted him authority for his various executive orders, even where they purport to make unilateral changes to legislation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- With every part of California suffering from the drought, Gov. Jerry Brown issued a new executive order on Friday in an attempt to provide some relief from the persistent dry conditions across the state. Brown's actions run the gamut from suspending some environmental regulations to asking restaurants to stop serving diners water unless they ask for it. He also ordered homeowners associations to stop fining residents for failing to water their lawns. During a speech at an environmental sustainability conference in Brentwood, Brown said he was calling on all Californians and municipal water agencies “to do everything humanly possible to conserve.” “Our fire seasons are longer, and the dry season is upon us, so we have to take renewed vigilance,” he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998
If Paul Blumstein (letter, July 8) wants to void all executive orders, we can give back Alaska, the Louisiana Purchase and reinstate all the debts forgiven by Nixon in his sweeping executive order regarding our foreign debts (1968). And who knows what else will have to be changed if we determine that executive orders can be retroactively forbidden. I know and you know that that is an ex post facto law, but then, the people out to "get" Clinton don't care how badly they damage the Constitution in the process.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama used his executive power and a hot-button issue to try to stoke support from a key election-year constituency Tuesday, as he issued two directives aimed at ensuring federal contractors pay women as much as men for equal work. Surrounding himself with female supporters at the White House, Obama signed an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about how much money they make. Advocates say secrecy about salaries is a major contributor to the gap in average pay between male and female workers in the United States, which the White House says means women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. The president also ordered contractors to report data to the government showing the compensation paid to employees by gender and race.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan abolished a record 386 presidential executive orders with one stroke of the pen Tuesday and signed a new one the White House said could save $20 billion a year by 1992 by making federal employees more productive. The White House said the orders revoked are obsolete or inactive. The orders cover a wide range of subjects, from examination for appointment to the military and naval academies to continuing the President's Advisory Committee on Women's Business Ownership.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
With 17 months of his presidency remaining, Ronald Reagan will bank on executive orders and judicial action to implement social policies that he cannot persuade Congress to enact, Gary L. Bauer, the President's chief domestic policy adviser, declared Thursday.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Bush on Wednesday issued the executive order he promised last November to protect Chinese students from deportation to their politically troubled homeland. Bush directed the attorney general to defer until Jan. 1, 1994, any deportation proceedings against Chinese nationals who were in the United States on or after June 5, 1989, and whose visas expire.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton's top spokesman said Wednesday that he expects Clinton to end the ban on homosexuals in the military by issuing an executive order, an action sought by gay-rights advocates who objected to proposals that a less forceful mechanism be used. Asked at Clinton's daily briefing how the President-elect intends to end the long-standing ban, communications director George Stephanopoulos said: "I expect it will be eventually by executive order.
BOOKS
August 25, 1996 | Paul Dean, Paul Dean is a Los Angeles Times staff writer
In this, his longest and lumpiest collage of fundamental values and techno-babble, Tom Clancy resolves our Clinton-Dole-Perot-Nader uncertainties by suggesting the least of five evils: Jack Ryan for president. Ryan--the indestructible, tighter-zippered superhero tied to Clancy and the CIA as closely as martini-weenie James Bond was to Ian Fleming and MI5--certainly speaks what the electorate knows in its heart is right: "Please, do not send me politicians.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting to defuse criticism on the eve of controversial global trade talks, the White House promised Tuesday to conduct environmental reviews of future trade agreements to reassure Americans that their safety and health are not in jeopardy.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Until Monday, Michelle Byrom was set to become the first woman executed by Mississippi in 70 years -- for a murder her son reportedly confessed to committing. The Mississippi Supreme Court halted Byrom's execution, threw out her murder conviction and ordered a new trial in one of the nation's most closely watched capital-punishment cases. In the decision handed down Monday, the court called its own move "extraordinary and extremely rare," at least compared to similar death-penalty appeals, few of which result in new trials.
OPINION
March 11, 2014
Re "The president's power grab," Opinion, March 9 President Obama's allies in Congress applauded his promise to legislate from the Oval Office because they share his ideology and consider their own relevance a fair price to pay for advancing it. Their disdain for process comes naturally in a system built to discourage concentrated power; in their view, concentrated power is exactly what society needs. Acquiescing to Obama's impromptu lawmaking, like invoking the "nuclear option" to deprive Senate Republicans of the filibuster for most confirmations, makes tactical sense today but raises obvious questions for tomorrow.
OPINION
February 21, 2014
Re "Imperial, shrinking president," Opinion, Feb. 18 As Jonah Goldberg insinuates, what we all learned in fifth-grade civics class about the "three branches of government producing checks and balances" now appears doubtful. Something of an honor system must operate to keep President Obama and Congress on the constitutional level. Obama contends that Congress has granted him authority for his various executive orders, even where they purport to make unilateral changes to legislation.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Evan Halper
In his State of the Union address, President Obama unveiled policies he can implement by executive order, as well as several needing congressional approval. Among them: Executive actions: • Create a retirement savings program for lower-income workers. The “starter” investment plan would be made available to millions of private-sector employees who do not currently have access to a 401(k) or pension. • Boost the minimum wage for workers hired by firms with federal contracts to $10.10 per hour.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama issued an executive order Tuesday that seeks to shore up the nation's cyber-defenses by improving how classified information is shared between the government and the owners and operators of crucial infrastructure, including electric utilities, dams and mass transit. The long-expected order, which Obama announced in his State of the Union speech, is a stopgap measure that follows Congress' failure last year to pass legislation to create comprehensive standards for the private sector to help thwart digital attacks.
NATIONAL
January 2, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Illegal immigrants who are immediate relatives of American citizens will have an easier path to permanent residency under a new Obama administration rule that could affect as many as 1 million of the estimated 11 million people unlawfully in the United States. The rule issued Wednesday by the Department of Homeland Security aims to reduce the time illegal immigrants are separated from their U.S. families while seeking legal status, officials said. Beginning March 4, illegal immigrants who can demonstrate that time apart from an American spouse, child or parent would create "extreme hardship" can apply for a visa without leaving the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2001 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Buena Park, police are distributing fliers to merchants, urging them to dim their lights at night. Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies are paying friendly visits to stores illuminated with unusually large amounts of decorative lighting. But elsewhere across Southern California, officers are resisting the role of "power police." It's been a week since Gov.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, seeking to avoid renewed controversy over his policy toward China, announced Friday that he will formalize and expand the protections reluctantly given four months ago to Chinese students in the United States. The President told the American Society of Newspaper Editors that he will issue a formal executive order guaranteeing that more than 40,000 Chinese students at American universities will be able to remain in this country at least until 1994.
OPINION
December 11, 2012
Re "Family of a fallen Marine sees his citizenship dream fulfilled," Dec. 7 The whole idea of "posthumous citizenship" is almost Dickensian in its "pound-of-flesh" approach. The cynic in me sees this as a warm and fuzzy human interest story to make those who oppose a rational immigration policy feel human. So many questions jump out: Why did it take his death for Marine Cpl. Roberto Cazarez to become a citizen? Why isn't citizenship automatic upon military enlistment or entry into a combat unit?
NATIONAL
November 29, 2012 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
A contingent of civil and immigrant rights organizations launched a lawsuit Thursday against Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, challenging an executive order she issued that denies driver's licenses to some youths who recently received immigration relief and work permits under a new Obama administration program. "This lawsuit is important because it's basically about the rights of young people to go about their daily lives and ability to be able to support their families," said Shiu-Ming Cheer, coauthor of the suit and immigration attorney with the National Immigration Law Center.
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