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NATIONAL
January 13, 2012 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
With the appointment of Jacob Lew as his new chief of staff, President Obama chose a Washington veteran who is well-liked on Capitol Hill, but — just as important for dealing with hostile Republicans in a election year — is also an expert on the executive powers Obama can use to advance his agenda without lawmakers' cooperation. Lew, who replaces William M. Daley, steps into the role after a year of fierce partisan battles that saw Obama's policy goals largely stalled in Congress.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- When prominent Latino activists meet with President Obama, there's one White House staff member present whom many of them have known since she was a child. Julie Chavez Rodriguez grew up handing out leaflets and knocking on doors with her grandfather, Cesar Chavez, the activist whose campaign to organize farmworkers still inspires today's Latino leaders. As deputy director of the Office of Public Engagement, Rodriguez runs Obama's organizing efforts in support of immigration reform, and supervises Latino outreach.
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NEWS
August 26, 1986
South Korea's major political parties formally presented their rival blueprints for amending the constitution and revising the setup of the government to a special committee of the National Assembly. The version proposed by the ruling Democratic Justice Party suggested a parliamentary Cabinet system under which the president is ceremonial head of state while the prime minister holds all executive powers.
OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Turley
Recently, a bizarre scene unfolded on the floor of the House of Representatives that would have shocked the framers of the Constitution. In his State of the Union address, President Obama announced that he had decided to go it alone in areas where Congress refused to act to his satisfaction. In a system of shared powers, one would expect an outcry or at least stony silence when a president promised to circumvent the legislative branch. Instead, many senators and representatives erupted in rapturous applause; they seemed delighted at the notion of a president assuming unprecedented and unchecked powers at their expense.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Elias Hrawi today signed constitutional reforms to give Muslims an equal share of power with the long-dominant Christians in a bid to resolve Lebanon's civil war. Hrawi's move is designed to set in motion a peace plan stalled by opposition from Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, the Christian army commander. There was no immediate response from Aoun, whose dwindling force of about 15,000 troops holds pockets of land in East Beirut and the nearby mountains.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | Reuters
President Leonid M. Kravchuk asked Parliament on Tuesday for sweeping executive powers to help him push through economic reforms. He attacked the "imperialist thinking" that he said has caused tension with Russia. "The foundation of our state is taking place in difficult times. The economic downturn is continuing. . . . People are losing faith in our ability to improve the situation," Kravchuk told Parliament's opening session.
OPINION
January 10, 2009
Re "Judging Bush," Jan. 4 For me, it can be summed up very simply: The Bush administration began by giving each taxpaying citizen a $300 to $600 tax refund and ended by spending $700 billion on a "bailout" to a select group of financial and other institutions. Mashey Bernstein Santa Barbara -- President Bush and his administration did great things for some, especially in the fight against AIDS. Unfortunately, his good deeds pale mightily against his decision to go back to Iraq, to have a legacy like his father.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- When prominent Latino activists meet with President Obama, there's one White House staff member present whom many of them have known since she was a child. Julie Chavez Rodriguez grew up handing out leaflets and knocking on doors with her grandfather, Cesar Chavez, the activist whose campaign to organize farmworkers still inspires today's Latino leaders. As deputy director of the Office of Public Engagement, Rodriguez runs Obama's organizing efforts in support of immigration reform, and supervises Latino outreach.
NEWS
May 9, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa, declaring that the Polish public is sick of a "condition of permanent crisis," asked Parliament on Friday to grant him strong executive powers, including the right to appoint the prime minister and his Cabinet. Condemning the paralysis that has seized the badly fragmented Parliament, Walesa asked the lawmakers to enact a "small constitution" that would give him presidential powers similar to those wielded by the president in the French system.
WORLD
July 11, 2012 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif
The power struggle between Egypt's newly elected Islamist president and the military has escalated, with lawmakers defying a court order and reconvening the dissolved parliament, marking another disturbing political twist over the future of a nation still tangled in the legacy of Hosni Mubarak. The Islamist-dominated parliament's brief session Tuesday was a symbolic victory for President Mohamed Morsi, who had ordered it to meet despite a recent court ruling that disbanded the chamber because of electoral violations.
WORLD
August 31, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Congress' attention to any potential military action in Syria is not just about checking executive war powers, it's also about money. Congress has been in a fierce budget slashing mode, but the White House probably would request additional funding for a military campaign against Syrian President Bashar Assad. Forces loyal to Assad are suspected of killing more than 1,400 people in a chemical weapons attack on rebel strongholds around Damascus, the capital, on Aug. 21. Budget issues are expected to be the top order of business when Congress returns from recess in September, and House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio)
WORLD
August 14, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi's firing of the nation's top generals was interpreted by analysts Monday as a politically engineered strategy to significantly broaden his powers as economic and political pressures mount in a country that still lacks a new constitution. The purge of the nation's military commanders on Sunday sharpened Morsi's authority as leader of the Arab world's most populous nation while proving him a better political tactician than many had believed.
WORLD
July 11, 2012 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif
The power struggle between Egypt's newly elected Islamist president and the military has escalated, with lawmakers defying a court order and reconvening the dissolved parliament, marking another disturbing political twist over the future of a nation still tangled in the legacy of Hosni Mubarak. The Islamist-dominated parliament's brief session Tuesday was a symbolic victory for President Mohamed Morsi, who had ordered it to meet despite a recent court ruling that disbanded the chamber because of electoral violations.
WORLD
June 30, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Mohamed Morsi, the son of a peasant farmer who rose through the ranks of the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood, was sworn in Saturday as Egypt's first freely elected president in a historic and potentially dangerous transition from military rule to a democratic government. The spirit of an unpredictable new era marked the day as Morsi sought to project a populist's air while brushing up against the pillars of the old guard. Dressed in a dark suit and wearing a trimmed beard, he symbolized the region's rising political Islam even as the authority of his office has been diminished by the generals in charge of the transitional government.
WORLD
June 25, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO — The historic election of Egypt's first Islamist president collided immediately with the political reality that the ruling military council has amassed legislative and executive powers in a strategy to block the Muslim Brotherhood from controlling the Arab world's most populous nation. Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi defeated Ahmed Shafik, the last prime minister to serve deposed leader Hosni Mubarak, the national elections commission announced Sunday. The race polarized the country and foreshadowed the political maneuverings certain to shape Egypt's incendiary transition to democracy after decades of autocratic rule.
WORLD
June 18, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The revolution, for now, has been crushed. The move by Egypt's generals to reduce the nation's first competitively elected president to a figurehead appears to be a decisive blow to the vision that a popular democracy would smoothly replace the longtime autocratic leadership of Hosni Mubarak. The military has resisted change since the 1950s, so there was scant surprise when it acted overnight Sunday to block any potential presidential designs against its authority. But even as election returns appeared to show Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi winning the presidential runoff vote against a vestige of the nation's status quo, retired air force Gen. Ahmed Shafik, supporters of the apparent victor seemed dispirited.
WORLD
June 30, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Mohamed Morsi, the son of a peasant farmer who rose through the ranks of the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood, was sworn in Saturday as Egypt's first freely elected president in a historic and potentially dangerous transition from military rule to a democratic government. The spirit of an unpredictable new era marked the day as Morsi sought to project a populist's air while brushing up against the pillars of the old guard. Dressed in a dark suit and wearing a trimmed beard, he symbolized the region's rising political Islam even as the authority of his office has been diminished by the generals in charge of the transitional government.
WORLD
August 14, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi's firing of the nation's top generals was interpreted by analysts Monday as a politically engineered strategy to significantly broaden his powers as economic and political pressures mount in a country that still lacks a new constitution. The purge of the nation's military commanders on Sunday sharpened Morsi's authority as leader of the Arab world's most populous nation while proving him a better political tactician than many had believed.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2012 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
With the appointment of Jacob Lew as his new chief of staff, President Obama chose a Washington veteran who is well-liked on Capitol Hill, but — just as important for dealing with hostile Republicans in a election year — is also an expert on the executive powers Obama can use to advance his agenda without lawmakers' cooperation. Lew, who replaces William M. Daley, steps into the role after a year of fierce partisan battles that saw Obama's policy goals largely stalled in Congress.
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas and Don Lee
Declaring that he won't wait any longer for Congress to act, President Obama said Monday he would use his executive power to help struggling homeowners refinance their loans and take advantage of historically low interest rates. Obama announced details of the plan in a modest subdivision of stucco houses in a city that has been walloped by foreclosures and falling home values. "I'm here to say to all of you and to the people of Nevada and Las Vegas that we can't wait for an increasingly dysfunctional Congress to do its job," Obama said.
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