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Executive Recruiting

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BUSINESS
December 22, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Korn/Ferry Plans to Divest 2 Units: The nation's biggest executive recruiting firm, Korn/Ferry International, said it has tentatively agreed to sell a controlling interest in its Los Angeles-based executive compensation firm, Strategic Compensation Associates, to the unit's nine partners. Korn/Ferry, which has headquarters in Los Angeles and New York, also is negotiating selling most or all of its Boston-based Korn/Ferry Organizational Consulting practice to that unit's officials.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 2008 | Karen E. Klein, Special to The Times
Dear Karen: Our firm usually brings executives through the ranks, but I need to replace a vice president quickly. Do you have any advice for using a "headhunter"? Answer: Executive recruiters, also known as headhunters, find, vet and interview individuals for executive positions, presenting top candidates to the business owner. They may charge a flat fee or request a percentage of the recruited executive's first-year salary.
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BUSINESS
August 4, 2005
* General Motors Corp.'s finance arm, which has warned that it may have to curtail lending because of its "junk" credit ratings, said it agreed to sell a 60% stake in its commercial mortgage unit to a private equity consortium. * Executive recruiting firm Korn/Ferry International Inc. of Los Angeles has accused a former senior executive and other ex-employees of stealing client information and using it at a competing business.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2005
* General Motors Corp.'s finance arm, which has warned that it may have to curtail lending because of its "junk" credit ratings, said it agreed to sell a 60% stake in its commercial mortgage unit to a private equity consortium. * Executive recruiting firm Korn/Ferry International Inc. of Los Angeles has accused a former senior executive and other ex-employees of stealing client information and using it at a competing business.
NEWS
December 10, 1987
The ABC Unified School District Board of Education has started preliminary steps to select a new superintendent to replace Kenneth L. Moffett, whose resignation is effective March 23. The board decided to begin soliciting proposals from executive recruiting firms, board President Catherine Grant said. The board also has scheduled a special meeting Wednesday to discuss the selection process, including ways to involve the public, Grant said.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | ALISA SAMUELS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As major corporations pay more to relocate executives, they are finding executives less willing to move to Southern California, a new survey said. Seventy-three percent of the human resources directors surveyed at more than 100 Southern California corporations in Russell Reynolds Associates' annual executive recruiting study said it is "somewhat" or "very" difficult to relocate executives here. In 1989, 71% said it was somewhat or very difficult. John S.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1986 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
For U.S. firms operating in Asia, how to recruit good middle and senior managers has long been a puzzle. Should they move one of their American executives, often at great expense, or hire someone overseas? If hiring abroad, should they take on American or European expatriates or opt for local nationals? How much should they pay, and what other compensation or perquisites are required?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1988 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
Camarillo officials, who have spent 10 months trying to find a finance director to replace one who resigned after bad investments cost the city $25 million, will hire an executive recruitment firm to aid in the search. The City Council unanimously voted Wednesday to pay $20,000 to the Los Angeles firm of Norm Roberts and Associates to find a finance director, whose annual salary will range from $55,000 to $67,000, depending on experience.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | Sallie Hofmeister
Stephen A. Unger, a leading Hollywood executive recruiter, has been named a partner in the worldwide entertainment and media practice of Heidrick & Struggles. Unger was previously managing director of Spencer Stuart's entertainment and communications recruiting practice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
David W. Tebet, a television talent executive who recruited Johnny Carson for NBC's "The Tonight Show" and went on to become vice president of Carson's production company, died Tuesday. He was 91. Tebet died at the Coronado, Calif., home of his nephew, Dr. Ralph Greenspan, of complications from a stroke. A former theater publicist in New York, Tebet in 1959 became NBC's vice president for talent -- or as comedian George Burns liked to call him, "the vice president in charge of caring."
BUSINESS
March 14, 2005 | Sallie Hofmeister and Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writers
When he announced that Robert Iger would be Walt Disney Co.'s next chief executive, Chairman George J. Mitchell went to great lengths to deflect criticism that the hiring process was flawed. In a conference call with reporters, Mitchell emphasized that the search was exhaustive, pointing to the 11 meetings the board convened in recent months to discuss succession and the "large number" of prospective candidates that were "evaluated" before Iger was tapped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2001
James Donald Reisser, a retired executive recruiter, has died at the age of 83. Reisser, who died Wednesday at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, was born Dec. 19, 1917, in Sioux City, Iowa. He grew up there and in Omaha. He attended Northwestern University, where he met his future wife, Harriet Cain, in 1937. The couple married Dec. 10, 1943, after she graduated and he received his Air Corps wings. He was a B-29 pilot and flight instructor during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1999 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials were so eager to avoid having to comply with a new state law that triples the amount of training required for reserve law enforcement officers that they rushed Sheriff Lee Baca's new "executive" recruits through their normal screening process, admitting one reservist who had been convicted of a weapons violation.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW
The Irvine executive recruiting firm Heidrick & Struggles last week unveiled its Internet recruiting service, joining a host of other traditional and online-only job-placement companies that have taken to the Web. Heidrick & Struggles said its LeadersOnline site (http://www.leadersonline.com) is aimed at what it anticipates will be a $9-billion electronic-recruiting market by the end of next year and will focus on filling technology positions.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1999 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles-based Korn/Ferry International, the world's largest executive search firm, is poised to go public this week with a long-delayed initial public stock offering. The IPO, originally slated for last fall, was put aside after market turmoil unnerved investors and prompted most firms to postpone such offerings. Korn/Ferry plans to sell 35% of the company's common stock to the public, or 12.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | Sallie Hofmeister
Stephen A. Unger, a leading Hollywood executive recruiter, has been named a partner in the worldwide entertainment and media practice of Heidrick & Struggles. Unger was previously managing director of Spencer Stuart's entertainment and communications recruiting practice.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Korn/Ferry Plans to Divest 2 Units: The nation's biggest executive recruiting firm, Korn/Ferry International, said it has tentatively agreed to sell a controlling interest in its Los Angeles-based executive compensation firm, Strategic Compensation Associates, to the unit's nine partners. Korn/Ferry, which has headquarters in Los Angeles and New York, also is negotiating selling most or all of its Boston-based Korn/Ferry Organizational Consulting practice to that unit's officials.
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