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SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan and Eric Pincus
Here's the Lakers' newest nightmare development, other than the play-so-terribly-they-miss-playoffs one they're living now. It starts with plenty of money to spend on free agents. And there's a player or two who can change a franchise. But he's also being recruited by the New York Knicks. Phil Jackson vs. the Lakers? Could easily happen. It won't be in July unless the Lakers show a renewed interest in Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony should he opt out of his contract. But next year, when Kevin Love and LaMarcus Aldridge could be available, the Knicks and Lakers will have plenty of money.
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OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A month from now, if all goes according to plan in Oklahoma, two convicted murderers will be executed by lethal injection, and without knowing exactly how the killing cocktail was put together or by whom. Without that knowledge, they could well be denied their basic constitutional protection against cruel and unusual punishment. The death penalty, as we've written before, is an indefensible mess of immorality, gamed judicial processes, misapplication based on race and class, and public expense.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
In early February, the Lakers ran out of players in an odd win at Cleveland over the Cavaliers, 119-108. On Thursday, Joe Borgia, the NBA's vice president of referee operations, gave his perspective (via NBA TV ) on the strange final minutes that saw Lakers center Robert Sacre finishing the game despite collecting his sixth personal foul. "We have to have five players on the court at all times," Borgia said. "If there are no available substitutes to come in the game, the player who fouls out has to remain in the game" The Lakers started the game short-handed, with Kobe Bryant, Jordan Hill, Pau Gasol and Jodie Meeks all out with injuries.  Nick Young bruised his knee during the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Daniel Miller and Meg James
It's one of Hollywood's longest-running guessing games: Who will succeed Walt Disney Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Iger? And it just got a little more interesting. Anne Sweeney's announcement this week that she will step down as head of Disney's media networks, including ABC-TV, could help set up important moves on a corporate chess board as Disney prepares for bigger and more dramatic changes. Iger agreed last summer to stay on as CEO through June 2016, 15 months longer than initially planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
The chief executive of Orange County's toll road agency has agreed to resign after less than one year on the job. Neil Peterson, who was hired in May, was put on administrative leave in February after coming under fire for spending thousands of dollars without public scrutiny because of a provision that allowed him to approve certain contracts without board approval. Lisa Telles, a spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies, declined to say why Peterson had decided to resign.
OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Turley
Recently, a bizarre scene unfolded on the floor of the House of Representatives that would have shocked the framers of the Constitution. In his State of the Union address, President Obama announced that he had decided to go it alone in areas where Congress refused to act to his satisfaction. In a system of shared powers, one would expect an outcry or at least stony silence when a president promised to circumvent the legislative branch. Instead, many senators and representatives erupted in rapturous applause; they seemed delighted at the notion of a president assuming unprecedented and unchecked powers at their expense.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Meg James
Veteran publishing executive Jack Griffin has been named chief executive of the new Tribune Publishing Co., leading a group of eight newspapers including the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune. The publishing chain is being spun off as a separately traded public company by Chicago-based Tribune Co., which plans to retain ownership of its TV stations and other properties. The separation is expected to happen this summer. Eddy Hartenstein, who has been publisher of The Times since August 2008, will become chairman of Tribune Publishing, a non-executive role.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Strive as one might for objectivity, certain shows come equipped with viewer expectations. So when Denis Leary announced that USA would be debuting his comedic accompaniment to "Rescue Me," a natural reaction, at least among Leary fans, would have been "Yay. " Then, when the first episode of "Sirens," which premieres Thursday, turned out to be one long (literally and figuratively) penis joke, an equally natural reaction might have been "Gaack. " Which is no doubt why USA sent three episodes for review.
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Perhaps it's not a big surprise that "12 Years a Slave," the acclaimed movie based on the true story of a free black man who was sold into slavery in the 1840s, won the Academy Award for best picture. It had already won critical acclaim and praise for its lead actors, director and writer (all of whom were nominated for Oscars as well). Besides, as Ellen DeGeneres, the host of the show, joked at the beginning of the evening, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voters had only two options: Either they could bestow their highest honor on "12 Years a Slave," or they were all racists.
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