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Executives Wages And Salaries

BUSINESS
February 3, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Northrop Grumman Corp. completes its $3.8-billion purchase of Litton Industries Inc. next month, the biggest beneficiaries may well be Litton's top executives, who could end up with $168 million in compensation. According to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday, the bulk of the merger-related largess will go to five senior executives at Litton, who could take home $110 million in vested stock options, severance and lump-sum supplemental retirement payments.
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BUSINESS
June 4, 1995
How the Survey Was Conducted To compute compensation, The Times counts the executive's salary and bonus, the stated value of stock options granted during the year, the value of stock awards, and any long-term or annual compensation--usually listed as "other" compensation in corporate reports but including car allowances, insurance premiums, retirement plan contributions, special consulting or director fees and loan forgiveness and other special arrangements that benefit the executive.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keizo Yoshida is the top officer of Sumitomo Bank of California, a big, profitable institution. Yet with an annual pay package worth $210,400, he earns only a fraction of what executives at similar banks take home. Yoshida isn't destitute, of course. But neither is he unique. Even as big money gets all the headlines, a surprising number of top executives are paid relatively modestly.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It clearly pays to be a top officer of one of California's top corporations, but company insiders often get far more than just a salary, perks and lucrative severance arrangements. In many cases, they are involved in other business arrangements with their firms that can pay off in a big way. Hamburger mogul Carl Karcher, for example, drew a relatively modest $389,169 in cash compensation from Carl Karcher Enterprises last year.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Global Crossing Chief Executive Robert Annunziata abruptly left the telecommunications firm a few weeks ago, sources said he was departing with a "generous" severance package. They weren't kidding. Annunziata received more than $160 million in total compensation for 1999, including his salary, bonuses, severance and gains on millions of options for company stock, according to a financial filing made public Friday.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | MATT MARSHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nation's charities are asking a new question in the wake of the United Way scandal: how much to pay their chief executives. CEO compensation has been a hot topic lately in the private sector. But questions about executive pay at nonprofit agencies arose after the resignation earlier this year of United Way President William J. Aramony, amid questions about financial matters. His salary was $463,000.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1993 | From Associated Press
IBM's new chairman and chief executive, Louis V. Gerstner Jr., could receive up to $8.5 million this year for accepting the challenge of turning around the troubled computer company. Separately, IBM laid off 1,400 employees at two manufacturing plants Tuesday, and continued notifying 1,200 workers of layoffs at a third facility. The layoffs were among the first in IBM's 79-year history.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1993 | DONALD. W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Chrysler Corp. Chairman Lee A. Iacocca can afford retirement. The auto maker paid its colorful former chief executive $12.2 million in 1992 and also handsomely rewarded its other top executives, according to a federal filing. Chrysler, the only U.S. auto maker to report a profit last year, paid Vice Chairman Robert J. Eaton, who succeeded Iacocca in January, $7.4 million in 1992, according to a preliminary proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission this week.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1994
While executive pay continued its meteoric rise overall, some top California executives took big cuts in their core salary or bonuses in 1993. This chart lists the 20 high-level executives at California's 100 biggest publicly held companies who took the largest pay cuts last year. Executive Company Title Michael D. Eisner Walt Disney Co. CEO, COB Jerry St. Dennis California Federal Bank COB William J. Schroeder Conner Peripherals Inc. VCOB Finis F. Conner Conner Peripherals Inc.
NEWS
December 4, 1997 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the single biggest payday for an executive in history, Walt Disney Chairman Michael Eisner on Wednesday exercised stock options at a profit of about $565 million that he had accumulated as head of the entertainment giant. Eisner exercised options for 7.3 million shares of stock that he has been accumulating since they were awarded him in contract negotiations in January 1989. The huge value reflects in part a Disney stock that has soared lately.
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