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Exemptions

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SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Eighteen state legislatures, including California's, have considered exemptions to immunization mandates in the last several years - and the issue remains a topic of debate, researchers said Tuesday. Most of the bills introduced in those 18 states sought to expand the exemptions available to school immunization requirements, but none of those bills passed, researchers wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. In California, a bill signed into law in 2012 allows parents to send their children to public school without vaccinations after they submit a form signed by a health professional affirming that they had been informed about the risks and benefits of immunization.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
With lawmakers showing little enthusiasm for an ambitious proposal by House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) to overhaul the byzantine U.S. tax code, Congress has to decide what to do about dozens of temporary tax breaks that expired Dec. 31. Among them is an exemption for forgiven mortgage debt that's an essential part of a broader federal effort to solve a nagging problem, namely the spate of defaults caused by the recession....
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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jon Healey
The Supreme Court took up the question Tuesday of whether for-profit corporations had the right to exercise a religion, and the answer seemed clear from the justices' questions: closely held corporations do. That bodes well for Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties, the companies challenging the Obama administration's requirement that their health insurance plans cover contraception. But that may not be the deciding factor in the case. Just as important are whether the federal government can show a compelling interest in providing easy access to contraception, and whether the mandate is the least-restrictive way to promote that interest.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Private space companies, such as SpaceX in Hawthorne, would get a local property tax break on launch vehicles, fuel, satellites and other gear under a bill approved overwhelmingly Thursday by the state Senate. The proposal, AB 777 by Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance), would create the exemption from local property taxes for a 10-year period that would end Jan. 1, 2024. Legislation is needed to modernize the state's tax code to encourage companies such as billionaire Elon Musk's SpaceX to build their rockets and spacecraft in California, Muratsuchi said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
Gov. Jerry Brown has agreed to scale back his cut to California's public healthcare program, endorsing legislation that would exempt some nursing facilities from a reduction in Medi-Cal funding. A previous effort to protect funding for such facilities stalled in an Assembly committee earlier this year, but the proposal was revived and inserted into a separate bill (SB 239) this week. The measure is expected to be approved by the Legislature on Thursday. Jan Emmerson-Shea, a spokeswoman for the California Hospital Assn., said the potential loss of funding would have been devastating to nursing facilities and forced patients into more expensive treatment centers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2010 | By Jack Dolan
California legislators voted Monday to exempt about 35% of state employees from having to take three days off each month without pay, an order imposed on government workers last year to help close the budget deficit. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), whose district is heavily populated with state employees, proposed the exceptions, which Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is expected to veto. "The governor cannot support any measure that would limit the state's ability to respond to a fiscal crisis," Schwarzenegger spokesman Aaron McLear said.
NEWS
November 13, 1986
The City Council Monday approved a law exempting police dogs from city license fees and leash requirements. It also exempted dogs that live in the city but are used by outside law enforcement agencies. Under the municipal code, dog owners are required to pay a $17 annual license fee and keep their pets on a six-foot leash and are prohibited from taking the animals to parks or inside stores and restaurants. Police said the rules hindered their pursuit and apprehension of criminals.
NEWS
December 30, 1993
Politicians are always seeking ways to relieve taxpayers of their hard-earned dollars. They often fail to let taxpayers know how they can reclaim a few bucks here and there. On July 21, 1993, South Pasadena City Councilman Harry Knapp made a motion to "direct the city manager to publicize the particulars of the low-income exemption program in the appropriate mediums." It passed 4-0. Several months have passed, and nothing has been received by me in the mail, in newspapers or in the water bills.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
Fifty-eight California insurance companies, including some major firms, have asked for exemptions from a 20% rate rollback under Proposition 103, the state Department of Insurance said today. The rollback, to rates 20% below November, 1987, levels, was upheld by the state Supreme Court last Thursday. But the court said insurers could get exemptions as needed for a "fair return" on their investment, a standard to be determined by Insurance Commissioner Roxani M. Gillespie. The ruling also allows insurance companies to put their rates into effect once they have filed with the department for an exemption.
NEWS
October 24, 1986 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
In TV commercial after TV commercial and on billboards scattered throughout the state, opponents of Proposition 65 lash out at the anti-toxics measure--not because it would be too tough on industry, but for exempting government agencies. The central theme of the anti-initiative advertising is, "Vote no on Proposition 65. It's full of exemptions."
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jon Healey
The Supreme Court took up the question Tuesday of whether for-profit corporations had the right to exercise a religion, and the answer seemed clear from the justices' questions: closely held corporations do. That bodes well for Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties, the companies challenging the Obama administration's requirement that their health insurance plans cover contraception. But that may not be the deciding factor in the case. Just as important are whether the federal government can show a compelling interest in providing easy access to contraception, and whether the mandate is the least-restrictive way to promote that interest.
OPINION
March 17, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last November, the Internal Revenue Service asked for public comments on proposed rules to rein in political activity by tax-exempt "social welfare" groups that don't disclose their donors. The agency has gotten an earful of negative reaction, not only from conservatives who long have accused the IRS of political bias, but also from some liberal and civil-liberties groups. (The Republican-controlled House has voted to delay the rules for a year.) A few of the criticisms are justified and easily addressed.
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last week President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | Emily Alpert Reyes
Homeowner groups from areas spanning the Santa Monica Mountains are accusing the Los Angeles City Council of undercutting hillside building restrictions by allowing a Bel-Air home to exceed height limits by nearly 40%. "Little by little, they are dismantling" hillside development limits enacted three years ago, said Marian Dodge, president of the nonprofit Federation of Hillside and Canyon Assns. The latest flare-up in the long-standing battle over hillside construction, encompassing some of Los Angeles' priciest neighborhoods, centers on a home proposed for Bellagio Road in Bel-Air.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Long Beach has approved strict rules on the use of electronic cigarettes in public spaces, tougher even than the regulations just adopted by the Los Angeles City Council. The restrictions, adopted on a 9-0 vote late Tuesday, mean that Los Angeles County's two largest cities will treat e-cigarettes in much the same way as regular cigarettes, banning their use in restaurants, bars, workplaces, city parks and beaches. In Long Beach, e-cigarettes will be classified as tobacco products, banning their sale to those younger than 18 and subjecting vendors to inspections and potential sting operations by the city's Health Department.
OPINION
February 26, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The headlines on the Pentagon budget unveiled by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel this week were all about austerity: the smallest U.S. Army since 1940; fewer aircraft, ships and armored vehicles; even some modest belt-tightening on future military pay and benefits. But one category of military spending largely escaped the budget ax: nuclear weapons. The United States has about 1,600 long-range nuclear weapons on active duty - more than any other country, including Vladimir Putin's Russia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2009 | John Hoeffel
A City Council committee Thursday recommended denying 18 applications for exemptions from the city's moratorium on new medical marijuana dispensaries. Twenty other requests were withdrawn, a reflection of the reality that the council is unlikely to approve many, if any. -- John Hoeffel
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2011 | Michael J. Mishak
A run-of-the-mill spat between two lawmakers has escalated into a referendum on government secrecy, exposing the lengths to which the Legislature will go to hide details about how it conducts the people's business. Accused by Assembly Speaker John A. Perez (D-Los Angeles) of being a profligate spender, Assemblyman Anthony Portantino (D-La Canada Flintridge) last month had his office budget cut and was threatened with suspension of his staff. Portantino said he was being punished as the only Assembly Democrat to vote against the state budget in June, and invited the speaker to prove him wrong by releasing details of lawmakers' office allowances.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | From staff reports
Each year, the Northern Trust Open awards an exemption to a player in the name of Charlie Sifford, who broke the PGA Tour's color barrier in the early 1960s and won the 1969 Los Angeles Open at Rancho Park. Harold Varner III, a regular on the Web.com minor league tour, was the recipient this year, and the 23-year-old played well Thursday in only his second PGA Tour start. He shot a two-under 69 and is three shots off the lead. He also showed a sense of humor, if not a gift for gab. During a post-round media session, he was asked what he could say about himself.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Eighteen state legislatures, including California's, have considered exemptions to immunization mandates in the last several years - and the issue remains a topic of debate, researchers said Tuesday. Most of the bills introduced in those 18 states sought to expand the exemptions available to school immunization requirements, but none of those bills passed, researchers wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. In California, a bill signed into law in 2012 allows parents to send their children to public school without vaccinations after they submit a form signed by a health professional affirming that they had been informed about the risks and benefits of immunization.
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