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Exercise Equipment

MAGAZINE
September 14, 1986 | VIRGINIA GRAY
The two-story-high windows in the living and dining area of this 3000-square foot pent house condominium offer a commanding view of the Hollywood hills. Owner Patrick Netter, a fitness enthusiast whose firm designs and sells exercise equipment for home and corporate use, bought the house in 1983, shortly after the building was completed. He hired designer Darrell L. Wight to help him rework the interior.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irvine-based Tectrix Fitness Equipment Inc., which makes computerized stationary bicycles and virtual reality fitness machines, has been purchased by a Massachusetts exercise equipment manufacturing company. Cybex International Inc. said Friday that it acquired Tectrix, adding the company's stair-climbing machines and stationary bikes to Cybex's weight-training and cardiovascular equipment. Terms were not disclosed.
NEWS
July 17, 1994
FROM: Robert A. Wiswell, chairman of USC's department of exercise science and member of the Governor's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports * Los Angeles may be the home of glamour gyms, health-obsessed aerobics. But, in fact, a very large portion of our population exercises little or not at all. For many, health club membership or the purchase of home exercise equipment is prohibitively expensive.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1997 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
Based on a review of her business by industry leaders, fitness entrepreneur Karen Voight was recognized by the International Assn. of Fitness Professionals as the Fitness Business Person of the Year in 1994. Here's a look at Voight's wide-ranging exercise empire: * Fitness videos: Seven titles, which have sold more than 334,000 units since 1993. * * Mail-order business: Features her videos and exercise equipment. * Endorsement: A deal with stationary-bicycle maker Keiser Sports Health Equipment.
NEWS
September 15, 2010
Here's a statistic in support of the U.S. obesity epidemic: Only 5% of Americans exercise vigorously on any given day. That's the conclusion of a study by researchers at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, La. They analyzed data from about 80,000 Americans participating in the American Time Use Survey andĀ found that while almost 80% engaged in light activities, such as driving a car or getting dressed, most did...
HEALTH
November 9, 1998 | CONNIE KOENENN
A buyer's guide to aerobic and cardiovascular exercise equipment: Treadmills Assessment: Offer a natural exercise and almost infinite capacity to adjust the level of exertion. Buying tips: Test the treadmill at different speeds; listen to the motor for signs of laboring; be aware the belt motion should remain smooth. Most are motorized, although they come in manual models. The number of users and their weights should be considered here.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1997 | GERI COOK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So, along with the rest of us, you ingested too many calories over the holidays and now you're thinking about exercising. What's an easier--and cheaper--way than doing it at home? I checked at one of the locations of Play It Again Sports for new or used exercise equipment and found some excellent deals. The Ab Exerciser that sells on TV for $49.99 plus shipping and handling is on special for $37.50. My favorite--the Aerobic Rider--is a bit pricey at most stores, costing $299.99.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irvine-based Tectrix Fitness Equipment Inc., which makes computerized stationary bicycles and virtual reality fitness machines, has been purchased by a Massachusetts exercise equipment manufacturing company. Cybex International Inc. said Friday that it has acquired Tectrix, adding the company's stair-climbing machines and stationary bikes to Cybex's weight-training and cardiovascular equipment. Terms were not disclosed.
HEALTH
November 9, 1998 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kelly Brown belonged to a gym and liked working out but was so involved in the family marketing business that it was a hassle to get there. And her husband, whose doctor had recommended cardiovascular workouts, didn't want to take the time. There seemed but one solution: Bring the gym home. So eight years ago she bought a Star Trek 2000 treadmill with all the extras: heart monitor, calorie meter and wheels for movability. The cost: about $4,000.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | GARY LIBMAN
In a Houston health club, an exercise machine called Laura Arendale a wimp. "I'm doing the best I possibly can," the housewife shot back, her feelings bruised. At a New York spa with burgundy carpets and antique chandeliers, advertising executive Susie Cabanas responded even more angrily when a fitness machine told her to keep going. "Aw, shut up!" she yelled.
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