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HEALTH
February 21, 2014 | By Rene Lynch
We all know plank position is good for us. But. Um. What if you lack the core strength needed to suck in the gut and engage the back, glutes and quad muscles - all while balancing between your toes and elbows? Answer: You slowly and carefully work your way up to it, says fitness expert Tosca Reno , author of the new book "The Start Here Diet. " What it does Plank position puts nearly every muscle in the body to work, especially the abs. It also helps create a mind-body connection as students learn to use opposing muscles to hold the position.
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SCIENCE
February 21, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Americans are stuck in chairs and on the couch, spending eight hours a day with their metabolic engines barely idling, according to data from sensors that scientists put on nearly 2,600 people to see what they actually did all day. The results were not encouraging: Obese women averaged about 11 seconds a day at vigorous exercise, while men and women of normal weight exercised vigorously (on the level of a jog or brisk uphill hike) for less than two minutes a day, according to the study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
TRAVEL
February 9, 2014 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: As you know, most of us develop some degree of lumbar disc degeneration as we age. My recollection is that a few years back there was a significant movement among all major hotel chains to offer upgraded bedding. Thicker, firmer mattresses with plush tops became common. Although many properties maintain these, some properties are using thinner, softer mattresses with considerably less back support. What's best? Randall Gellens San Diego Answer: What's best for you depends on your shape, your size and your needs, mattress experts told me. I can tell you that, as I am writing this, I have just rolled out of a hotel bed, and this mattress is not what I need, unless I need to feel as though I have been run over by a cement mixer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The National Marine Fisheries Service violated federal law when it authorized the Navy's use of sonar in training exercises off Hawaii and California through 2018, an environmental group said in a lawsuit filed Monday. The agency's own analysis had determined the war games would result in 155 marine mammal deaths, more than 2,000 permanent injuries and about 9.6 million instances of temporary hearing loss and disruptions of vital behaviors - an 1,100% increase over the previous five-year period, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.
HEALTH
January 17, 2014 | By Melinda Fulmer
When someone or something has rocked your boat, here's a great way to calm the upset and feel more in control. Called rock the boat, it is demonstrated here by yoga educator Leah Kalish, founder of Move With Me Action Adventures. It's great for both kids and adults when they need to get back on track after an upsetting or overwhelming day. What it does The side-to-side move massages the large gluteus muscles on either side of your sacrum, or the base of your spine, releasing tension and soothing your nervous system.
HEALTH
January 10, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
How are those new 2014 workouts going? Need a little inspiration boost? We talked to four prominent trainers and fitness personalities in hopes of finding keys to helping you work out - successfully - for years to come. Harley Pasternak, 39, has trained superstars including Lady Gaga and is a bestselling author whose latest title is "The Body Reset Diet. " He has a master's in exercise physiology and nutrition sciences from the University of Toronto. Americans are over-exercising and underactive, Pasternak says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
We all know that reading a novel can transport you, delight you and intrigue you while you're reading it. Now, thanks research by scientists at Emory University, we know that immersing yourself in a novel causes measurable physical changes in the brain that can be detected up to five days after the reader closes the book. The Emory researchers, in a paper for the journal Brain Connectivity, compared the effect to “muscle memory.” "The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," neuroscientist Gregory Berns said, according to a report in the journal Science Codex . "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
It's 5 a.m. on a rooftop parking lot in downtown Santa Ana and the night sky is just beginning to fade. Under a lamp's orange glow, people in hoodies and sweat pants emerge from the stairwell, wiping the sleep from their eyes and hugging themselves against the cold. "You guys ready?" asks Marc Payan, clutching a mug of coffee in one hand, his phone in the other. On his command, about 100 people lunge around the concrete lot, then quickly step into two long lines facing each other.
HEALTH
December 20, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
If you're looking for a move that will get your butt "tight and right," this is it, says fitness expert Lacey Stone, who uses it on her Extreme Bootcamp app for iPhone and iPad. What it does The squat with a lateral kick works your glutes, quadriceps and hamstrings, and done quickly enough, it gets your heart rate up to torch calories too. What to do From a standing position with feet shoulder-width apart, lower into a squat, with your weight in your heels, making sure your knees don't extend past the tips of your shoes and your back isn't hunched over.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Martin Tsai, This post has been corrected. See note below for details
One of the all-time top-grossing films at the South Korean box office, "Friend" played at the AFI Fest in 2001 but never saw a stateside theatrical release. Writer-director Kwak Kyung-taek's semi-autobiographical coming-of-age story - set against the Busan underworld - resonated with an entire generation of South Koreans, but much of its appeal eluded audiences abroad who weren't privy to that collective memory. Nevertheless, its sequel, "Friend 2: The Legacy," arrives in a dozen American theaters 12 years later, perhaps as a testament to the thriving ethnic enclaves across the nation.
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