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Exhibits Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been called the "linen enigma," and the "most intensely studied artifact of modern science." Detractors label it an "obvious fraud," and some religious scholars weigh in with a more generous "pious forgery." Now, a local gynecologist has brought the mystery, the history and the nasty disagreement surrounding the Shroud of Turin to Orange County--more than 6,000 miles from the town where the real thing lies protected in an Italian cathedral. Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been called the "linen enigma," though detractors label it an "obvious fraud," and some religious scholars weigh in with a slightly more generous "pious forgery." Now, an Orange County gynecologist has imported the mystery, history and nasty disagreement surrounding the Shroud of Turin more than 6,000 miles from where the real thing remains in an Italian cathedral. Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been called the "linen enigma," though detractors label it an "obvious fraud," and some religious scholars weigh in with a slightly more generous "pious forgery." Now, an Orange County gynecologist has imported the mystery, history and nasty disagreement surrounding the Shroud of Turin more than 6,000 miles from where the real thing remains in an Italian cathedral. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been called the "linen enigma," and the "most intensely studied artifact of modern science." Detractors label it an "obvious fraud," and some religious scholars weigh in with a more generous "pious forgery." Now, a local gynecologist has brought the mystery, the history and the nasty disagreement surrounding the Shroud of Turin to Orange County--more than 6,000 miles from the town where the real thing lies protected in an Italian cathedral. Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Forget the Statue of Liberty, never mind that Boeing 707. According to Cecil Fergerson, guest curator of "Reflections: African-American Art," now at the City of Brea Gallery, Western historians have accomplished a feat that even David Copperfield might envy: They've made Egypt disappear from Africa. "When [slave traders] brought the slaves here, they were able to eradicate all cultural ties after three generations," said Fergerson, 64.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1995 | TINA NGUYEN
Dozens of mental health professionals will converge today for Orange County's first Awareness Conference, scheduled to coincide with national observances of May as Mental Health Month. Sponsored by the nonprofit Mental Health Assn. of Orange County, the event will be from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Doubletree Hotel Orange County in Orange. It will include about 30 exhibits from Orange County health care providers and a tour of UC Irvine's new neuropsychiatric building. The Mental Health Assn.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | GEORGE BUNDY SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A Fullerton College art professor, struck by a car as he rode his bicycle to work today, was placed on life-support systems with severe head injuries at UCI Medical Center in Orange. Don Hendricks, 41, an artist who has taught at the college since 1975 and once served as the City of Brea's artist in residence, was hit at 6:51 a.m. on Chapman Avenue near Lemon Street, Fullerton police said. Police said the driver was not arrested, but an investigation is continuing.
NEWS
January 9, 1988 | WILLIAM S. MURPHY
A family's interest in history was the foundation for a museum that today houses one of the finest collections of artifacts from many lands and varied cultures to be found in California. It's the Bowers Museum of Santa Ana. The story has its beginning with Charles Bowers, who, in search of a more temperate climate, moved from Missouri and settled in Santa Ana in 1886. In 1910, Bowers and his wife, Ada, traveled throughout the United States and Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1989 | GEORGE BUNDY SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A Fullerton College art professor suffered fatal head injuries when he was struck by a car as he rode his bicycle to work early Wednesday, authorities said. Don Hendricks, 41, an artist who had taught at the college since 1975 and served for 3 years as Brea's artist in residence, was hit at 6:51 a.m. a few blocks from the campus, police said.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | ROBERT LACHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There may come a time when you start to think of photography as more than a hobby. It could happen when a friend or neighbor suggests that you sell your work. Or perhaps you begin to think that your photographs are better than some of the published art you've seen. You need to know, however, that changing your status from amateur to artist can be challenging. Sometimes the preparation takes longer than producing the work. And you have to prepare for a lot of rejection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Forget the Statue of Liberty, never mind that Boeing 707. According to Cecil Fergerson, guest curator of "Reflections: African-American Art," now at the City of Brea Gallery, Western historians have accomplished a feat that even David Copperfield might envy: They've made Egypt disappear from Africa. "When [slave traders] brought the slaves here, they were able to eradicate all cultural ties after three generations," said Fergerson, 64.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to the Times Orange County Edition.
Looking back at a century of fairs in Orange County shows that, while some things have changed, the basic premise remains the same. Kids still raise pigs and cows for show and auction. There are still contests for the best blueberry jam and the nicest needlework. Fair-goers can still win a prize by knocking down a stack of bottles on the midway. Sure, the county has grown a lot in the last few decades, with development squeezing out the last vestiges of the area's agricultural past.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | SHEARLEAN DUKE
When Geri Conser's plane crashed into the ocean four years ago while she was photographing a national yacht race in Newport Beach, she thought her career as an aerial yachting photographer was over. Not only did she lose her cameras, photos and her own plane, which sank in 180 feet of water, she also broke her back. Since the crash, however, Conser's back has healed and her photography career has taken off like a high-flying jet.
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