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Exile

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WORLD
December 10, 2009 | By Borzou Daragahi
"Tehran is online," the director's wife announces. For the third time in less than an hour, Mohsen Makhmalbaf politely excuses himself. He ambles off to the other end of a sparsely furnished salon-turned-makeshift war room: a desktop computer, two laptops perched on end tables and a giant television screen. He fits on a headset and begins speaking to an aide of one of Iran's opposition figures. One of his country's most highly regarded filmmakers, Makhmalbaf has lived abroad for five years, moving his family first to Afghanistan and then to Paris.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
As in many a thriller, the helpful stranger in "The German Doctor" turns out to be a monster. In this case, he's no run-of-the-mill sadist but Josef Mengele, Auschwitz's Angel of Death, and he finds prime subjects for experimentation in an Argentine family. The drama by LucĂ­a Puenzo, adapting her novel "Wakolda," is a credible imagining of a brief period in Mengele's South American exile. The what-if conceit is intriguing enough not to be undone by increasingly heavy-handed symbolism.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
The leader of the Tibetan government in exile is in Los Angeles this week, and although his administration is not officially recognized by the U.S. or any other regime, Tibetans living here have done their best to mark his visit with all the pomp afforded a visiting head of state. On Sunday, they greeted him at Los Angeles International Airport with white scarves and flowers. Later, a line of shiny black cars, each festooned with a Tibetan flag, ferried him to a reception at a nearby church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | Chris Kraul and Andres D'Alessandro
Argentine poet Juan Gelman, an exile whose writings were colored by personal tragedy he suffered at the hands of his country's brutal military dictatorship, died in Mexico City on Tuesday. He was 83 and had been battling leukemia. Gelman, a leftist with working-class origins, won the Cervantes Prize, perhaps the most prestigious Spanish language literary honor, in 2007 for his stark, soulful verse. But the son of Jewish Ukrainian immigrants also personified the tragedy suffered by thousands of Argentinian families under the 1976-1983 military dictatorship.
MAGAZINE
December 27, 1987
The opening statement of "In Exile" (by Michael Cieply, Nov. 22) is unbelievable. " 'The U.S. has this wonderful Constitution,' says fugitive movie director Roman Polanski, gulping a luncheon of oysters and white wine in a Paris restaurant recently. 'But it is troubled by other things that it has to get under control. The Puritanism.' " Just what right does a criminal have to tell the rest of us what is wrong with us? How can we even think of allowing such a widely publicized criminal to be given not equal but special consideration under our laws?
REAL ESTATE
April 27, 1986
Though I have been an Angeleno in exile in the Bay Area for six years, I have remained a daily reader of The Times and an admirer of its real estate, housing, and urban affairs coverage. It was especially nice to read an article by Bradley Inman (March 30) in the real estate section. Being involved with housing, I have become familiar with Inman's work with the Bay Area Council and his writing in local publications. I have come to respect and enjoy his well-balanced and insightful commentary on problematic real estate issues and the wide range of topics and perspective that he uncovers.
NEWS
November 17, 1987 | Associated Press
Napoleon Bonaparte met his second Waterloo on ABC last week as the miniseries "Napoleon and Josephine: A Love Story" ended up in the Nielsen ratings' version of St. Helena. The three-part series, despite its beautiful French background and the tempestuous love story re-enacted by Armand Assante and Jacqueline Bisset, failed to arouse much interest from the viewers. The first chapter Tuesday was in 15th place. The next night it dropped to 26th place. The third night it fell to 30th place.
WORLD
September 19, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A massacre this month at an Iranian exile camp in Iraq that killed 52 people under international protection was an act of premeditated slaughter and should be thoroughly investigated by the United Nations, two former foreign ministers told the world body Thursday. Former foreign ministers Bernard Kouchner of France and Sid Ahmed Ghozali of Algeria told a U.N. panel in Geneva that the Sept. 1 raid on the exile refuge known as Camp Ashraf represents "a crime against humanity. " The former top diplomats also said they had grave fear for the safety of seven survivors of the attack who were taken hostage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"I played music in high school, I worked in record stores, music was my No. 1 fix," says Stephen Kijak, adding it all up. "I don't know why I'm making films, I should have been in a band." As a filmmaker, director Kijak has done the next best thing. He's made "Stones in Exile," a gorgeously entertaining documentary premiering at the Cannes Film Festival that provides a fascinating window into the Rolling Stones experience via a detailed look at the making of one of their albums.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Alex Renderos, Los Angeles Times
Manuel Zelaya, the president of Honduras ousted in a military-led coup nearly two years ago, returned home from exile Saturday, greeted by a large, heated crowd and a nation still bitterly divided by tension and violence. With Zelaya's return, Honduras hopes to end its political and diplomatic isolation and overcome one of the ugliest periods of recent Central American history. Zelaya pledged to immediately reengage in politics and will probably lead a new party. "This is the moment to declare victory for the democratic process in Latin America," Zelaya proclaimed.
WORLD
September 19, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A massacre this month at an Iranian exile camp in Iraq that killed 52 people under international protection was an act of premeditated slaughter and should be thoroughly investigated by the United Nations, two former foreign ministers told the world body Thursday. Former foreign ministers Bernard Kouchner of France and Sid Ahmed Ghozali of Algeria told a U.N. panel in Geneva that the Sept. 1 raid on the exile refuge known as Camp Ashraf represents "a crime against humanity. " The former top diplomats also said they had grave fear for the safety of seven survivors of the attack who were taken hostage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
The leader of the Tibetan government in exile is in Los Angeles this week, and although his administration is not officially recognized by the U.S. or any other regime, Tibetans living here have done their best to mark his visit with all the pomp afforded a visiting head of state. On Sunday, they greeted him at Los Angeles International Airport with white scarves and flowers. Later, a line of shiny black cars, each festooned with a Tibetan flag, ferried him to a reception at a nearby church.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The free-form documentary "The Gardener" takes acclaimed, exiled Iranian filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf ("Kandahar") and son Maysam to Israel to investigate the 170-year-old Bahai faith, which - although based in Haifa - has its roots in Persia. Unfortunately, the elder Makhmalbaf, who wrote and directed, puts many spins on this ethereal mood piece - it is by turns poetic, impressionistic, metaphorical and even a bit trippy - without satisfying such genre basics as structure, depth and resolution.
WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Fugitive NSA leaker Edward Snowden issued a plaintive appeal Monday from his diplomatic limbo at a Moscow airport, accusing the Obama administration of using the "bad tools of political aggression" to render him stateless. Snowden, whose U.S. passport was revoked after he began his globe-trotting flight from justice for leaking national security secrets, lamented in a statement posted on the WikiLeaks website that President Obama was obstructing his right to seek asylum by threatening countries willing to grant it. Snowden has been holed up in a transit area of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport for more than a week and the strain of being trapped in a judicial standoff of his own making was palpable in his accusatory statement.
WORLD
May 24, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The State Department's decade-long effort to find a new home for a controversial Iranian opposition group has ground to a near halt only days after the announcement that the exiles had begun moving from Iraq to permanent homes in Europe. Fourteen members of the Mujahedin Khalq militant group, or MEK, were flown from the outskirts of Baghdad to Albania on May 15, in what was expected to be the first step in the departure of 3,100 members of the group that has long opposed the government of clerics in Tehran and is also at odds with the government of Iraq.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek died Monday, he left behind a musical legacy that included 15 singles that made Billboard's hot 100 list, including the songs "Light My Fire," "Waiting for the Sun," "Touch Me," "Riders on the Storm," and "People Are Strange. " Less well known is his literary legacy, which included a memoir and two novels. The memoir was "Light My Fire: My Life With the Doors. " Manzarek was uniquely positioned to tell the story of the Doors, having begun the band with Jim Morrison after they met in Venice, Calif., in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Keith Richards remembers the period in the early 1970s when the Rolling Stones were working on "Exile on Main St." as a fairly down time. The parts he remembers at all, that is. That's partly due to the fact that the recording sessions took place as the Stones guitarist and songwriter's heroin habit took hold in a big way, a habit that took him nearly a decade to shake. But it wasn't strictly the drugs he was referring to when he spoke recently about that fabled phase in his and the group's life.
WORLD
April 19, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf was arrested and placed in police custody Friday, a day after commandos whisked him away from an Islamabad courthouse where he faces charges of illegally detaining dozens of judges while in power. Musharraf, who only a few weeks ago presented himself as a patriotic savior returning to his homeland from self-imposed exile, was being held at police headquarters at least until his next court appearance, which was expected within 48 hours.
OPINION
March 26, 2013 | By Patrick Flanery
"Why don't you guys move home to the States?" my friends ask. "Because," I say, "although I am American, my partner is not, and because of DOMA, I can't sponsor him for a green card. " "But you're married. " TIMELINE: Gay marriage chronology "Technically, we're civil partnered, but immigration is a federal issue. It doesn't matter that individual states recognize my relationship with my husband or partner, or whatever I choose to call him. " "But that's unfair.
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