Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsExiles Cambodia
IN THE NEWS

Exiles Cambodia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
Prince Norodom Ranariddh, admitting his forces are no match against his rival's, agreed Friday to call off armed resistance to Cambodia's new strongman. The concession could avert a full-scale civil war. Ranariddh had urged his supporters to fight Second Prime Minister Hun Sen, the co-premier who ousted him in a coup two weeks ago. But Ranariddh's forces have since been routed by Hun Sen's bigger, better-equipped army.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
King Norodom Sihanouk returned to Cambodia from China on Saturday on his first trip home since he granted a controversial pardon to his son, deposed co-premier Prince Norodom Ranariddh. Also Saturday, the Cambodian army said a key Khmer Rouge base had fallen. Pro-government forces recaptured the Khmer Rouge base at Anlong Veng on Tuesday, and guerrillas were fleeing to the Dangrek Mountains near Thailand, Gen. Meas Sophea said.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after Prince Norodom Ranariddh went from royalty to refugee in a bloody ouster, the bit of Cambodia still under his control can fit into a hotel room. Cambodia's deposed first prime minister has become the crown of a mobile kingdom in exile, a suitcase sovereign, hurtling from country to country pleading for support for a return to power. So far, he has failed to persuade the United Nations, Washington and even his father, King Norodom Sihanouk, to fight for his restoration.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Norodom Ranariddh's return here Monday after nearly nine months in exile has given this sad and tortured land one last stab at democracy. If things go as hoped--although that seldom happens in Cambodia--Ranariddh, the son of King Norodom Sihanouk, and the man who overthrew him last July in a bloody coup, former Khmer Rouge commander Hun Sen, will meet in an internationally financed election July 26.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
King Norodom Sihanouk returned to Cambodia from China on Saturday on his first trip home since he granted a controversial pardon to his son, deposed co-premier Prince Norodom Ranariddh. Also Saturday, the Cambodian army said a key Khmer Rouge base had fallen. Pro-government forces recaptured the Khmer Rouge base at Anlong Veng on Tuesday, and guerrillas were fleeing to the Dangrek Mountains near Thailand, Gen. Meas Sophea said.
NEWS
July 13, 1988
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, taking up exile in France, said that he resigned as president of the Cambodian guerrilla coalition because of assaults on his forces by his supposed allies, the Communist Khmer Rouge. He also criticized backers of the coalition "who favor the Khmer Rouge outrageously in their distribution of arms"--an apparent reference to China.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Norodom Ranariddh's return here Monday after nearly nine months in exile has given this sad and tortured land one last stab at democracy. If things go as hoped--although that seldom happens in Cambodia--Ranariddh, the son of King Norodom Sihanouk, and the man who overthrew him last July in a bloody coup, former Khmer Rouge commander Hun Sen, will meet in an internationally financed election July 26.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Prince Norodom Sihanouk resigned Saturday as president of Cambodia's exile government and broke with its 6-year-old resistance coalition, blaming internal strife over his peace talks with the country's Vietnam-backed regime. Sihanouk, who last May took a "leave of absence" in a similar protest, bitterly criticized the infighting that has torn the coalition since its formation in 1982 by the three main factions fighting Vietnamese occupation troops in Cambodia.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Cambodian government troops Friday captured a strategic guerrilla stronghold after four days of fierce fighting in the first major victory of the Communist government's counteroffensive, Phnom Penh Radio reported. Hours later, guerrilla leader Prince Norodom Sihanouk returned home from exile.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after Prince Norodom Ranariddh went from royalty to refugee in a bloody ouster, the bit of Cambodia still under his control can fit into a hotel room. Cambodia's deposed first prime minister has become the crown of a mobile kingdom in exile, a suitcase sovereign, hurtling from country to country pleading for support for a return to power. So far, he has failed to persuade the United Nations, Washington and even his father, King Norodom Sihanouk, to fight for his restoration.
NEWS
July 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
Prince Norodom Ranariddh, admitting his forces are no match against his rival's, agreed Friday to call off armed resistance to Cambodia's new strongman. The concession could avert a full-scale civil war. Ranariddh had urged his supporters to fight Second Prime Minister Hun Sen, the co-premier who ousted him in a coup two weeks ago. But Ranariddh's forces have since been routed by Hun Sen's bigger, better-equipped army.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Cambodian government troops Friday captured a strategic guerrilla stronghold after four days of fierce fighting in the first major victory of the Communist government's counteroffensive, Phnom Penh Radio reported. Hours later, guerrilla leader Prince Norodom Sihanouk returned home from exile.
NEWS
July 13, 1988
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, taking up exile in France, said that he resigned as president of the Cambodian guerrilla coalition because of assaults on his forces by his supposed allies, the Communist Khmer Rouge. He also criticized backers of the coalition "who favor the Khmer Rouge outrageously in their distribution of arms"--an apparent reference to China.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Prince Norodom Sihanouk resigned Saturday as president of Cambodia's exile government and broke with its 6-year-old resistance coalition, blaming internal strife over his peace talks with the country's Vietnam-backed regime. Sihanouk, who last May took a "leave of absence" in a similar protest, bitterly criticized the infighting that has torn the coalition since its formation in 1982 by the three main factions fighting Vietnamese occupation troops in Cambodia.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|