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Exiles Chad

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December 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hissen Habre, the former president of Chad ousted by rebels a week ago, hopes to find refuge in the United States, his entourage reported. However, a U.S. Embassy spokesman in Yaounde, Cameroon, reported that Habre had not requested asylum and referred further queries to the State Department in Washington. Habre, 48, has reportedly been negotiating asylum in Zaire. Habre flew to Cameroon just before Idriss Deby, his former chief military adviser, took control of the Chadian capital of
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NEWS
December 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hissen Habre, the former president of Chad ousted by rebels a week ago, hopes to find refuge in the United States, his entourage reported. However, a U.S. Embassy spokesman in Yaounde, Cameroon, reported that Habre had not requested asylum and referred further queries to the State Department in Washington. Habre, 48, has reportedly been negotiating asylum in Zaire. Habre flew to Cameroon just before Idriss Deby, his former chief military adviser, took control of the Chadian capital of
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NEWS
December 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Hissen Habre fled the country Saturday after a string of rebel victories, and Libyan-armed guerrilla fighters later marched into the capital, Western diplomats said. Habre and much of his government sought refuge in neighboring Cameroon, the diplomats said. As the rebels closed in, soldiers threw away their guns and uniforms, leaving the city practically undefended. There was wild looting in the capital, N'Djamena, by civilians and renegades from the Chadian army.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Hissen Habre fled the country Saturday after a string of rebel victories, and Libyan-armed guerrilla fighters later marched into the capital, Western diplomats said. Habre and much of his government sought refuge in neighboring Cameroon, the diplomats said. As the rebels closed in, soldiers threw away their guns and uniforms, leaving the city practically undefended. There was wild looting in the capital, N'Djamena, by civilians and renegades from the Chadian army.
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