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Exiles East Germany

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January 11, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fallout from political turmoil in Eastern Europe is causing headaches and nervous tension in Chile. The troubles started in early December after Hungarian authorities discovered an illegal air shipment of Chilean arms. The 11 tons of weapons were en route to Croatian fighters, in violation of a United Nations embargo on civil war-torn Yugoslavia. On Dec. 11, former President Erich Honecker of East Germany took refuge in the Chilean Embassy in Moscow.
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NEWS
January 11, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fallout from political turmoil in Eastern Europe is causing headaches and nervous tension in Chile. The troubles started in early December after Hungarian authorities discovered an illegal air shipment of Chilean arms. The 11 tons of weapons were en route to Croatian fighters, in violation of a United Nations embargo on civil war-torn Yugoslavia. On Dec. 11, former President Erich Honecker of East Germany took refuge in the Chilean Embassy in Moscow.
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NEWS
November 17, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian Federation has decided to expel former East German leader Erich Honecker, its justice minister said Saturday, but Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev opposes returning him to stand trial in Germany on charges of giving shoot-to-kill orders to guards at the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian Federation has decided to expel former East German leader Erich Honecker, its justice minister said Saturday, but Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev opposes returning him to stand trial in Germany on charges of giving shoot-to-kill orders to guards at the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
September 18, 1985 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A secretary in the office of West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl has defected to East Germany, along with her husband, and both are under investigation as suspected spies, officials announced Tuesday. Spokesmen for the West German government said that Herta-Astrid Willner, 45, and her husband, Herbert, 59, sent letters to their offices from East Berlin, saying they had quit their jobs and defected.
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