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Exiles Liberia

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September 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States plans to fly Liberia's fugitive former warlord, Roosevelt Johnson, to Freetown in Sierra Leone today to end a stand-off that began over the weekend when he took refuge in the U.S. Embassy. President Charles Taylor's spokesman said the government will not stand in the way of Washington flying out Johnson, whom Taylor accuses of treason.
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NEWS
September 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States plans to fly Liberia's fugitive former warlord, Roosevelt Johnson, to Freetown in Sierra Leone today to end a stand-off that began over the weekend when he took refuge in the U.S. Embassy. President Charles Taylor's spokesman said the government will not stand in the way of Washington flying out Johnson, whom Taylor accuses of treason.
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NEWS
October 6, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not very long ago, it was an article of faith among Liberians anxious to see an end to their country's civil war that peace would return when President Samuel K. Doe left. Doe was captured by rebels and slain a month ago, and things have only become worse. Today, three armies, including a "peacekeeping" force deployed by five members of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), are engaged in full-scale war in and around the capital, Monrovia.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not very long ago, it was an article of faith among Liberians anxious to see an end to their country's civil war that peace would return when President Samuel K. Doe left. Doe was captured by rebels and slain a month ago, and things have only become worse. Today, three armies, including a "peacekeeping" force deployed by five members of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), are engaged in full-scale war in and around the capital, Monrovia.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With armed looters controlling the Liberian capital's increasingly dangerous streets, the United States sent two more warships toward the country Friday to join a growing military presence that officials declared is solely intended to protect U.S. diplomats and fleeing foreigners. State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said that the number of evacuees airlifted from Liberia by U.S. forces had topped 1,000, about 165 of whom were Americans.
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