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Exiles Paraguay

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NEWS
February 4, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Alfredo Stroessner was driven from power Friday in a fierce military coup led by his second-in-command, who vowed to bring democracy to Paraguay and to respect civil rights after nearly 35 years of dictatorship. Gen. Andres Rodriguez, 64, took the oath of office as president and saluted the public from the balcony of the government palace a few hours after his forces routed Stroessner's loyalist troops in combat that raged across the capital.
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NEWS
September 10, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Gen. Lino Oviedo, the fugitive Paraguayan political boss who is suspected of ordering the assassination of his archrival in March, appears to spread strife wherever he goes. Five months after fleeing Paraguay for Argentina, Oviedo has become a divisive issue in Argentine politics and in South America's increasingly tense Mercosur trading bloc. He may also become a test case in a region trying to end a tradition of impunity for dictators, military strongmen and others of their ilk.
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NEWS
April 26, 1987
Opposition leader Domingo Laino, exiled four years ago by the government of President Alfredo Stroessner, returned to Paraguay without incident. Laino, a 51-year-old economist, was expelled in December, 1982, for writing a book critical of former Nicaraguan leader Anastasio Somoza, a friend of Stroessner's who was assassinated in Asuncion in 1980.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | Reuters
A Paraguayan judge asked Interpol to capture former Gen. Lino Oviedo, exiled in Argentina, for his role in the deaths of six protesters last month, Foreign Minister Miguel Abdon Saguier said Saturday. Oviedo fled Paraguay last week after the impeachment and eventual resignation of President Raul Cubas Grau, who freed the former army chief in August. Oviedo was serving a 10-year jail sentence for leading a failed coup in 1996.
NEWS
September 10, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Gen. Lino Oviedo, the fugitive Paraguayan political boss who is suspected of ordering the assassination of his archrival in March, appears to spread strife wherever he goes. Five months after fleeing Paraguay for Argentina, Oviedo has become a divisive issue in Argentine politics and in South America's increasingly tense Mercosur trading bloc. He may also become a test case in a region trying to end a tradition of impunity for dictators, military strongmen and others of their ilk.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | Reuters
A Paraguayan judge asked Interpol to capture former Gen. Lino Oviedo, exiled in Argentina, for his role in the deaths of six protesters last month, Foreign Minister Miguel Abdon Saguier said Saturday. Oviedo fled Paraguay last week after the impeachment and eventual resignation of President Raul Cubas Grau, who freed the former army chief in August. Oviedo was serving a 10-year jail sentence for leading a failed coup in 1996.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | From Reuters
The United States has revoked the visa of Paraguay's ousted dictator Alfredo Stroessner, U.S. officials said Thursday. Asked to comment on reports that Stroessner is seeking to come to the United States for medical treatment, a State Department official said that he knew of no visa request. "Stroessner's visa has been revoked. He'd have to reapply," the official said, adding that a visa request from Stroessner, like all others, would be given due consideration.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Alfredo Stroessner, Paraguay's unshakable dictator for a third of a century, flew into exile Sunday from the airport that bears his name, two days after he tumbled from power in a military coup staged by his right-hand man. Hundreds of people cheered and chanted "Long live free Paraguay!" as Stroessner, showing little emotion, boarded a Paraguayan Airlines Boeing 707 for Brazil. His departure at 3:49 p.m. was the culmination of three tumultuous days for this nation of 3.1 million people.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | From Reuters
The United States has revoked the visa of Paraguay's ousted dictator Alfredo Stroessner, U.S. officials said Thursday. Asked to comment on reports that Stroessner is seeking to come to the United States for medical treatment, a State Department official said that he knew of no visa request. "Stroessner's visa has been revoked. He'd have to reapply," the official said, adding that a visa request from Stroessner, like all others, would be given due consideration.
NEWS
March 24, 1989
A Paraguayan judge has ordered the arrest of air force Col. Gustavo Stroessner, son of deposed President Alfredo Stroessner, for "illegal enrichment" through extortion and influence peddling. The younger Stroessner accompanied his father into Brazilian exile on Feb. 5, two days after Gen. Andres Rodriguez staged a violent coup. Judge Dario Caballero said he acted after receiving a detailed police report accusing Col. Stroessner, 46, of "making a great fortune illegally."
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Alfredo Stroessner, Paraguay's unshakable dictator for a third of a century, flew into exile Sunday from the airport that bears his name, two days after he tumbled from power in a military coup staged by his right-hand man. Hundreds of people cheered and chanted "Long live free Paraguay!" as Stroessner, showing little emotion, boarded a Paraguayan Airlines Boeing 707 for Brazil. His departure at 3:49 p.m. was the culmination of three tumultuous days for this nation of 3.1 million people.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Alfredo Stroessner was driven from power Friday in a fierce military coup led by his second-in-command, who vowed to bring democracy to Paraguay and to respect civil rights after nearly 35 years of dictatorship. Gen. Andres Rodriguez, 64, took the oath of office as president and saluted the public from the balcony of the government palace a few hours after his forces routed Stroessner's loyalist troops in combat that raged across the capital.
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