Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsExiles Philippines
IN THE NEWS

Exiles Philippines

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 26, 1988 | JIM MANN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
Former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos has offered to give back $5 billion to the Philippines and to support the government of President Corazon Aquino if he is permitted to return there and be exempted from criminal prosecution, according to participants in the negotiations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department has denied a travel visa to a former Philippine Communist leader living in exile in the Netherlands, prompting a possible conflict over whether the action violates a congressional mandate to halt exclusions based on a person's political beliefs. Jose Maria (Joma) Sison, who more than 20 years ago founded the Maoist-oriented Communist Party of the Philippines and its military arm, the New People's Army, sought the visa to appear in Honolulu federal court early next year.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Msgr. Domingo Nebres raised his hands toward heaven in the small funeral chapel of the San Jose Sanctuary and uttered a Requiem prayer over the remains of the 95-year-old woman before him. "Let us pray to God," Nebres said, "that at least the eldest son will be able to come home in order to reconfirm the beautiful traditions of our culture and country. Let us pray to God that mother and son will be united once again on that funeral day."
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trembling and speechless, former First Lady Imelda Marcos went before a Philippine judge as an accused criminal for the first time Tuesday to post bail on three charges, present her homemade mug shots and be fingerprinted. The charges against the woman the government says stole $5 billion? Failing to report the death of her husband, deposed President Ferdinand E. Marcos, in Hawaii in September, 1989, and failing to file income tax returns for 1985 and 1986.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weeping and clutching a rosary, flamboyant former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos returned home to a tumultuous welcome today after nearly six years of exile in the United States. Thousands of loyalists and curious onlookers lined the road for more than five miles from the airport, honking horns, blowing sirens, tossing confetti, waving flags and shouting pro-Marcos slogans. Workmen clanged pipes and cheered from construction sites along the road.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was one of the richest men in Asia, a billionaire who ruled over vast industries and coconut plantations, championship horse farms and even his own private army. He was also a former provincial governor in the Philippines and a political confidant of the late President Ferdinand E. Marcos, sharing the same military plane as they fled a popular revolt that toppled the Marcos government in 1986. But for the last four years, Eduardo Murphy Cojuangco Jr.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | From Reuters
After declaring she could not wait to go home, Imelda Marcos on Thursday angrily and tearfully rejected the terms the Philippine government has set for her return and hinted that she will not be going anywhere soon. Dressed in black, she went to the Philippine Consulate here and picked up a one-page travel document, good for only a month, allowing her to return to the Philippines but not leave.
NEWS
August 27, 1988 | Reuters
President Corazon Aquino has accepted the idea that Ferdinand E. Marcos, the man she helped drive from power two years ago, might eventually return to the Philippines from exile in Hawaii, her spokesman said on Friday. "She has accepted that," Teodoro Benigno said when asked by reporters if Aquino saw Marcos's return as inevitable. Solicitor General Francisco Chavez has said Marcos could be brought back to face criminal charges expected to be filed by the end of the year.
NEWS
August 25, 1988
Ousted Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos asked a Manila court to order the government to give him travel documents so he can return home to defend himself against corruption charges. In a petition filed by his sister, Fortuna Barba, the exiled former ruler said he wants to take advantage of his constitutional rights to attend legal proceedings against himself.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Corazon Aquino has agreed to allow ousted ruler Ferdinand E. Marcos to return to the Philippines so that the government can try him on charges of stealing billions of dollars during his 20 years in power, a spokesman for her confirmed Saturday. It was the strongest indication yet that the Aquino government is willing to risk the security threat posed by Marcos' return to put him on trial.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was vintage Imelda Marcos. Sitting in a luxury hotel, where she has taken the $2,000-a-day Imperial Suite and 60 rooms for her entourage, surrounded by some of her four high-priced American lawyers, 20 American security agents and members of a Washington-based public relations firm, the former first lady on Monday told a clamoring crowd of reporters and supporters it is time to tell "the truth." "I come home penniless," she said, appearing to fight back tears.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weeping and clutching a rosary, flamboyant former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos returned home to a tumultuous welcome today after nearly six years of exile in the United States. Thousands of loyalists and curious onlookers lined the road for more than five miles from the airport, honking horns, blowing sirens, tossing confetti, waving flags and shouting pro-Marcos slogans. Workmen clanged pipes and cheered from construction sites along the road.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | BOB DROGIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos and the Philippine government have reached a tentative agreement to settle two $5-billion civil racketeering cases and unfreeze her assets, lawyers for the two sides said Friday night. The lawyers said the proposed settlement is contingent on her return to the Philippines next week to stand trial on massive civil and criminal charges there. Imelda Marcos, widow of former President Ferdinand E.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The son of ousted President Ferdinand E. Marcos returned to Manila on Thursday after almost six years in exile, saying he wants to prepare the way for a Philippine burial for his father's remains. "The Marcos family now feels that the time has come that my father be put to rest," Ferdinand E. Marcos Jr., 34, told reporters after arriving from Singapore.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Imelda Marcos, the flamboyant former Philippine First Lady, plans to return to Manila on Monday from nearly six years' exile in the United States. Marcos says she will fly home in a charter jet from Honolulu after visiting the crypt of her late husband, Ferdinand, the former president. Accompanying her, aides say, will be doctors, scientists and others who will assist in her self-appointed role as "mother of the Filipino people."
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | Reuters
A Philippine court ruled Tuesday that exiled former First Lady Imelda Marcos is no longer a threat to national security and ordered the government to issue her a passport. A lawyer for Marcos said she plans to return to her homeland Nov. 4, ending 5 1/2 years in exile in the United States that began when her late husband, Ferdinand E. Marcos, was overthrown in a popular revolt in 1986. He died in Hawaii in 1989. On her return, Marcos faces trial on charges of tax evasion.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
On the morning of June 23, a delegation of Philippine legislative leaders gathered over breakfast at Washington's elegant Madison Hotel with the Philippine ambassador to the United States and their host, historian Allen Weinstein of the Center for Democracy. The Manila congressmen were there to talk about major issues confronting the U.S. and Philippine governments: military base negotiations, prospective U.S.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
A 48-hour deadline for former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos to complete any plea bargaining on an anticipated fraud and conspiracy indictment ran out Thursday, making federal grand jury charges against him imminent, government sources said. Officials refused to speculate about what steps federal authorities will take if Marcos is indicted, but it was learned that FBI agents in Honolulu have been alerted to stand by for immediate action.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | From Reuters
After declaring she could not wait to go home, Imelda Marcos on Thursday angrily and tearfully rejected the terms the Philippine government has set for her return and hinted that she will not be going anywhere soon. Dressed in black, she went to the Philippine Consulate here and picked up a one-page travel document, good for only a month, allowing her to return to the Philippines but not leave.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|