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April 28, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five top African National Congress officials, who have directed a guerrilla war against white rule for most of three decades, returned from exile Friday to an emotional, flag-waving homecoming in South Africa. The four men and one woman smiled broadly as about 100 supporters cheered their arrival in Cape Town, where they will join six internal ANC leaders and supporters for next week's historic talks with the South African government about the ANC's preconditions for black-white negotiations.
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NEWS
December 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Nations began a huge airlift to repatriate 30,000 South Africans over the next year, with the first flight bringing home 120 political exiles from Tanzania. African National Congress supporters greeted the 120 at Johannesburg airport after the flight from Dar es Salaam arranged by the United Nations' refugee agency. Some exiles have returned home without U.N. support. But up to 30,000 remain in guerrilla bases and farming and education centers in neighboring African states.
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NEWS
March 12, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Ralph Ngijima left South Africa to join the African National Congress on a dark night in 1976, stealing across a remote, mountainous stretch of the border with the police on his trail. The townships were in flames then, and Ngijima figured he would have just a year or two on the "outside" before his comrades toppled the white government in Pretoria. But before long he began to wonder if he would ever see home again.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During 14 hard years in African exile, Meisie Khayiyana dreamed of returning to a liberated South Africa and pined for this peaceful township and the two toddlers she had left behind. She wrote letter after letter home, but each was confiscated by the South African police. Were her children still alive? Did they know why their mother had left? Or that their father had been killed in the struggle for black liberation? She had no way of knowing.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Nations began a huge airlift to repatriate 30,000 South Africans over the next year, with the first flight bringing home 120 political exiles from Tanzania. African National Congress supporters greeted the 120 at Johannesburg airport after the flight from Dar es Salaam arranged by the United Nations' refugee agency. Some exiles have returned home without U.N. support. But up to 30,000 remain in guerrilla bases and farming and education centers in neighboring African states.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress declared Saturday that it will not take part in planned constitutional talks with the white-minority-led government until President Frederik W. de Klerk acts decisively to stop violence in black townships and ban the carrying of Zulu spears. But ANC leaders said they will maintain other contacts with the government, including discussions on the violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miriam Makeba coughed, and someone immediately asked if the cause was Soweto smog. She smiled at this reference to her hometown's distinctively grimy air. That was one memory, she explained, that she didn't have to bring with her during 31 itinerant years of exile. "No, there's smog all over the world," she said. South Africa's greatest musical export came home last week.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Activists silenced for years by government "listings" and emergency restrictions tested their voices Saturday as tens of thousands of blacks welcomed South Africa's lifting of bans on political groups with peaceful marches in three cities. At the same time, the African National Congress, the principal anti-apartheid organization legalized by President Frederik W. de Klerk on Friday, reiterated its oft-stated position that it will not unilaterally halt its guerrilla war against Pretoria.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During 14 hard years in African exile, Meisie Khayiyana dreamed of returning to a liberated South Africa and pined for this peaceful township and the two toddlers she had left behind. She wrote letter after letter home, but each was confiscated by the South African police. Were her children still alive? Did they know why their mother had left? Or that their father had been killed in the struggle for black liberation? She had no way of knowing.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oliver R. Tambo, who stole out of South Africa in 1960 on a secret mission to rebuild the banned African National Congress in exile, returned home Thursday to a tumultuous welcome after three decades as external leader of the liberation movement. The 73-year-old ANC president, appearing frail but smiling broadly, was greeted at the airport by a throng of ANC leaders, foreign ambassadors and anti-apartheid dignitaries.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
South Africa and the United Nations on Friday cleared the way for thousands of South Africans who fled apartheid to return home. Douglas Stafford, deputy U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, and Pretoria's ambassador to Geneva, Leslie Manley, initialed an agreement granting an amnesty for political crimes to an estimated 40,000 exiles. "This agreement marks the beginning of the end of a 30-year-long human tragedy," U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Sadako Ogata said in a statement from Japan.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On that night six years ago, there was just the border and an old man. Ahead lay the road--away from South Africa. The old man watched for army patrols as Nkululeko Sowazi and three others slipped across the border. Sowazi remembers that the man spoke few words, and how the words hung in the night air. "You must return," he said, "because we need you." Now, Sowazi is packing away the mementos of exile. He will carry them, a bachelor's degree, and a master's degree from UCLA, across the Atlantic.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress declared Saturday that it will not take part in planned constitutional talks with the white-minority-led government until President Frederik W. de Klerk acts decisively to stop violence in black townships and ban the carrying of Zulu spears. But ANC leaders said they will maintain other contacts with the government, including discussions on the violence.
NEWS
April 30, 1991
Despite frenzied, last-minute efforts, the South African government isn't going to make its deadline today for granting indemnity to political exiles and freeing political prisoners. So far, the government has freed 650 prisoners and promised not to prosecute 4,000 exiles. It says it still is considering amnesty applications from 200 prisoners, but the ANC counts 1,300 political prisoners whom it says should be freed immediately. As yet, President Frederik W.
NEWS
March 8, 1991 | From Associated Press
The first planeload of exiled African National Congress supporters returned Thursday to South Africa, greeted by hundreds of singing and cheering relatives and friends. "It is very good to be back," said Joel Diamond, 48, thrusting his fists in the air as he entered Jan Smuts International Airport. "The struggle continues." Outside the airport, police at one point used dogs to try to disperse the waiting crowd.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oliver R. Tambo, who stole out of South Africa in 1960 on a secret mission to rebuild the banned African National Congress in exile, returned home Thursday to a tumultuous welcome after three decades as external leader of the liberation movement. The 73-year-old ANC president, appearing frail but smiling broadly, was greeted at the airport by a throng of ANC leaders, foreign ambassadors and anti-apartheid dignitaries.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
South Africa and the United Nations on Friday cleared the way for thousands of South Africans who fled apartheid to return home. Douglas Stafford, deputy U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, and Pretoria's ambassador to Geneva, Leslie Manley, initialed an agreement granting an amnesty for political crimes to an estimated 40,000 exiles. "This agreement marks the beginning of the end of a 30-year-long human tragedy," U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Sadako Ogata said in a statement from Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of arts and culture for the African National Congress was having trouble remembering her New York fax number. She thumbed through her phone directory trying to find it, smiled when she thought she had it, then frowned when she lost it again. "I'm sorry," Barbara Masekela sighed as she apologized to a visitor in her Santa Monica hotel room. "It's been a long, rough trip."
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Frederik W. de Klerk announced Monday that political exiles can begin applying to return to South Africa, addressing a key demand of the African National Congress. His statement followed a three-hour meeting with ANC leader Nelson Mandela at which they discussed violence in South Africa's black townships, which has killed about 800 people since mid-August.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miriam Makeba coughed, and someone immediately asked if the cause was Soweto smog. She smiled at this reference to her hometown's distinctively grimy air. That was one memory, she explained, that she didn't have to bring with her during 31 itinerant years of exile. "No, there's smog all over the world," she said. South Africa's greatest musical export came home last week.
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