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Exiles Sudan

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January 4, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day before his daughter's wedding, Sudanese opposition leader and former Prime Minister Sadek Mahdi slipped out of his house in Khartoum before sunrise dressed for horseback riding. Instead, he made a beeline across the rocky desert for the Eritrean border 320 miles to the east. At prearranged points, he met up with fellow conspirators, armed to defend themselves if necessary, and they crossed the frontier undetected, welcomed by supporters on the other side.
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NEWS
January 4, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day before his daughter's wedding, Sudanese opposition leader and former Prime Minister Sadek Mahdi slipped out of his house in Khartoum before sunrise dressed for horseback riding. Instead, he made a beeline across the rocky desert for the Eritrean border 320 miles to the east. At prearranged points, he met up with fellow conspirators, armed to defend themselves if necessary, and they crossed the frontier undetected, welcomed by supporters on the other side.
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NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DALIA BALIGH, Associated Press
Four years after he was ousted in a palace coup, Sudan's former president, Jaafar Numeiri, spends his time in a large, slightly decrepit villa, plotting to seize power again. He has aged visibly and put on weight during the years as a political outcast in Cairo. The villa and the guards patrolling it with automatic weapons are courtesy of the Egyptian government, which granted Numeiri political asylum after he was stranded in Cairo by his defense minister's coup. Numeiri had just returned from an aid-seeking visit to Washington on April 6, 1985, when Gen. Abdul-Rahman Swareddahab sided with civil disobedience campaigners to oust him. Numeiri had been in power 16 years.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DALIA BALIGH, Associated Press
Four years after he was ousted in a palace coup, Sudan's former president, Jaafar Numeiri, spends his time in a large, slightly decrepit villa, plotting to seize power again. He has aged visibly and put on weight during the years as a political outcast in Cairo. The villa and the guards patrolling it with automatic weapons are courtesy of the Egyptian government, which granted Numeiri political asylum after he was stranded in Cairo by his defense minister's coup. Numeiri had just returned from an aid-seeking visit to Washington on April 6, 1985, when Gen. Abdul-Rahman Swareddahab sided with civil disobedience campaigners to oust him. Numeiri had been in power 16 years.
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