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Exit Exam

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OPINION
April 24, 2009
It could be, as university researchers conjecture, that negative stereotypes of minorities and girls lead these two groups to perform worse on California's high school exit exam. That doesn't mean, however, that the state should back off from the exam intended to require a minimum level of competency among those who receive a diploma.
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OPINION
August 25, 2012
Re "More passing exit exam," Aug. 23 Congratulations to the teachers, administrators and, above all, the students in the Los Angeles Unified School District for continued improvement on the California High School Exit Exam. The achievement should have been noted on the front page of The Times. The improvement for Latino and African American students is particularly noteworthy. So often many of those students have wonderful parents who have less than a high school education and earn less than parents of white middle-class parents.
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OPINION
January 2, 2005 | John Rogers, John Rogers is associate director of UCLA's Institute for Democracy, Education and Access.
The California High School Exit Exam is a house of cards that's about to collapse on 100,000 students. Beginning in 2006, no student will receive a public high school diploma without having passed that test. The state's theory behind the exam is that threatening to deny diplomas, even to students who have passed all their courses, will motivate schools to teach better and students to study harder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Two-thirds of Los Angeles Unified sophomores passed the state high school exit exam on their first try, a record number that reflects six years of consecutive improvement, the school district announced Wednesday. Supt. John Deasy credited the success to a more targeted effort to use data to identify students struggling with the reading, writing and math skills and to give them more help. "The results are the best I could ever have imagined," Deasy said. "I'm very proud. " The pass rate reflects a 23 percentage point gain from 44% in 2003-04.
OPINION
May 16, 2006
Alameda County Superior Court Judge Robert B. Freedman made a bad decision when he ruled that it is unlawful discrimination to deny a high school diploma to students who can't pass the exit exam because some were not provided adequate educational opportunities (May 13). The exam requirement may have been unfair to the students who brought the lawsuit because of their other high achievements, but the judge's ruling is unfair to a greater number of students by robbing them of an important symbol of their success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Two-thirds of Los Angeles Unified sophomores passed the state high school exit exam on their first try, a record number that reflects six years of consecutive improvement, the school district announced Wednesday. Supt. John Deasy credited the success to a more targeted effort to use data to identify students struggling with the reading, writing and math skills and to give them more help. "The results are the best I could ever have imagined," Deasy said. "I'm very proud. " The pass rate reflects a 23 percentage point gain from 44% in 2003-04.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2007
A Superior Court judge Monday approved a settlement in a lawsuit over California's mandatory high school exit exam. The settlement calls for school districts to offer two years of test-preparation instruction to students who did not graduate on time because they did not pass the exam. The accord is part of a bill awaiting legislative approval that would allow school districts to spend state funds on instruction for such students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2009 | Mitchell Landsberg
California's high school exit exam is keeping disproportionate numbers of girls and non-whites from graduating, even when they are just as capable as white boys, according to a study released Tuesday. It also found that the exam, which became a graduation requirement in 2007, has "had no positive effect on student achievement."
OPINION
January 29, 2006 | Russell W. Rumberger, RUSSELL W. RUMBERGER is professor of education and director of the UC Linguistic Minority Research Institute at UC Santa Barbara.
NEARLY 100,000 high school seniors -- about one in eight -- have flunked the California high school exit exam. Half of all students who speak English as a second language have not passed. Nor have two-thirds of special education students, though a deal to exempt seniors with learning disabilities this year is moving through the Legislature. Lawsuits challenging the legitimacy and fairness of the exam have been filed. In response, state Supt.
OPINION
May 20, 2006
Re "No exit," Opinion, May 17 Erin Aubry Kaplan's column was laughable. What good is spending 12 years in school if you're not required to learn anything? The exit exam makes a high school diploma valid. I doubt Kaplan would use a lawyer who never passed the bar exam or a doctor who didn't graduate from medical school. How about those who can't pass their driver's tests? Give them a license anyway? Personal responsibility is one of the first things a child should learn. Blaming the school system, racism, poverty or big government won't get you very far in life; working hard will.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of photos of standardized tests have begun to appear on social-networking sites in California, raising concerns about test security and cheating by students. In the worst-case scenario, the photos could lead to invalidating test scores for entire schools or prevent the state from using certain tests. For now, officials have warned school districts to heighten test security and investigate breaches. Students are not allowed to have access to cellphones or other devices that can take pictures when the tests are administered.
OPINION
April 23, 2012
Taking sides Re "Vatican says nuns' group must reform," April 20 Thousands of women who have given up marriage and money to work tirelessly to help the poor, the sick and the needy - just as Jesus asked them to - are being blasted for doing so. Just because they show Scriptural leadership and love rather than meekly pushing someone else's political agenda, they are being vilified by male Roman Catholic Church leaders. Throughout the Old and New Testaments, we see remarkable, devout female leaders - Deborah, Miriam, Esther, Mary, Martha, Lydia and many more come to mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Nearly one in 10 students in the class of 2009 did not pass the state's high school exit exam, which is required to receive a diploma. The results, released Wednesday, were nearly stagnant compared with the previous year. By the end of their senior year, 90.6% of students in the graduating class had passed the two-part exam, compared with 90.4% in the class of 2008. "These gains are incremental, but they are in fact significant and they are a true testimony to the tremendous work being done by our professional educators . . . as well as our students," said state Supt.
OPINION
June 27, 2009
California is broke, but kids still need to know how to read and do basic algebra. It's an insult to the aspirations of California students that legislators moved to kill the high school exit exam :a=latimes_1min&feed:c=topstories&feed:i=47535918&nopaging=1 as a graduation requirement. Excusing it as a budget move, all six Democratic legislators on the budget conference committee voted quickly, with little debate and no real public airing.
OPINION
April 24, 2009
It could be, as university researchers conjecture, that negative stereotypes of minorities and girls lead these two groups to perform worse on California's high school exit exam. That doesn't mean, however, that the state should back off from the exam intended to require a minimum level of competency among those who receive a diploma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2009 | Mitchell Landsberg
California's high school exit exam is keeping disproportionate numbers of girls and non-whites from graduating, even when they are just as capable as white boys, according to a study released Tuesday. It also found that the exam, which became a graduation requirement in 2007, has "had no positive effect on student achievement."
OPINION
June 14, 2003
California has a lot of homework to do on the high school exit exam before requiring teenagers to pass it before graduating. Educators must resolve questions about what high schoolers have to know, how this exam compares with other graduation tests, where remedial help is failing and why a recent report shows that many students never got what they need from middle school. Students entering senior year this fall are supposed to get a diploma only if they pass the exam.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California should seriously consider postponing implementation of its new high school exit exam for a year or two, according to a report by an independent evaluator that was presented to the state Legislature on Wednesday. Although much progress has been made in developing the high-stakes exam, "a great deal remains to be done" before the test can be successfully administered, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
The predictable result came in last week from forcing students with disabilities to pass a high school exit exam in order to earn a diploma. Nearly half failed. Failed. A demoralizing word for some kids who struggle daily to perform tasks most teens carry out with ease. The psychological damage "is horrific," says Sid Wolinsky, director of litigation for Disability Rights Advocates, which fought unsuccessfully for alternative ways to measure the knowledge of special education students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
One in 10 high school seniors in the class of 2008 failed to pass California's exit exam by graduation, the lowest rate of passage since the test became mandatory to earn a diploma three years ago, according to data released Tuesday by the state Department of Education. The estimated passage rate dipped, state officials said, because for the first time special education students were required to take the exam to receive diplomas, and their test results were included in the tally.
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