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NEWS
August 8, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
With a poisonous atmosphere and temperatures so unbearably cold they can plunge to 220 degrees below zero, Mars is an inhospitable place where any unprotected creature from Earth would die instantly. But a team of NASA scientists, noting that the atmosphere of Earth has changed dramatically throughout history--and apparently is still changing because of human activities--has concluded that it just might be possible to change the atmosphere of Mars so that the Red Planet could support life.
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NEWS
August 8, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
With a poisonous atmosphere and temperatures so unbearably cold they can plunge to 220 degrees below zero, Mars is an inhospitable place where any unprotected creature from Earth would die instantly. But a team of NASA scientists, noting that the atmosphere of Earth has changed dramatically throughout history--and apparently is still changing because of human activities--has concluded that it just might be possible to change the atmosphere of Mars so that the Red Planet could support life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1991
Continuing its program of space life sciences, NASA awarded $5 million Friday to three San Diego institutions to further the study of exobiology, or life on other planets. Researchers at UC San Diego, Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute will work five years as a consortium, officials said Friday. The consortium will be headed by the California Space Institute, directed by former astronaut Sally Ride, who is also a member of the Scripps faculty.
SCIENCE
May 19, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Tim
Had enough of life in the fast lane and looking to take it down a notch or two? You might seek guidance from a colony of deep-sea microbes harvested from the barren depths of the Pacific Ocean that are progressing so slowly, they almost appear to be dead. Just how plodding are these ancient creatures, who are buried about 100 feet deep in the seabed? Some of them haven't received any new food for 86 million years, when dinosaurs still walked the Earth. And they are using up oxygen at rates 10,000 times slower than their counterparts on the surface of the ocean floor.
NEWS
April 3, 1985 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
Halley's Comet is coming--and so is Carl Sagan, that charismatic tour guide to the cosmos, with a book on comets. Astronomy's prolific superstar is at work, too, on a novel about the first contact with extraterrestrial life and on a book about nuclear war and weaponry. At 50, Sagan has a toddler daughter, Alexandra, 2; an infant grandson--and a cause to which he is passionately committed--bringing about a halt to the nuclear arms race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong and Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writers
Leslie Orgel, the Salk Institute theoretical chemist who was the father of the RNA world theory of the origin of life and who joined with Nobel laureate Francis Crick to postulate that life might have been seeded on Earth by a higher intelligence, died at the San Diego Hospice & Palliative Care on Oct. 27 from pancreatic cancer. He was 80. Reasoning that DNA was too complex to have been the first repository of genetic information, Orgel and others speculated that RNA could have preceded it, simplifying the evolutionary process.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2007 | Sara Lippincott, Times Staff Writer
The Living Cosmos Our Search for Life in the Universe Chris Impey Random House: 394 pp., $27.95 -- I used to feel confident that we had plenty of time to get off this planet before it burned up. You may know, or perhaps have forgotten, that in 5 billion years the sun will have become a red giant whose circumference will encompass the orbit of Mars. But Chris Impey, an astronomer at the University of Arizona, warns that only a billion years from now the swelling sun "will boil away the oceans."
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Rocket scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena are proposing to send a hit-and-run mission to Jupiter's icy moon Europa in hopes of finding signs of life: A small spacecraft would drop a 20-pound ball onto the moon's surface, sending up a plume of icy material that the mother ship would then pass through, soaking up samples like a flying sponge. JPL researchers are scheduled to formally present their proposal today at a meeting in San Juan Capistrano devoted to Europa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Rocket scientists meeting in San Juan Capistrano today are proposing to send a hit-and-run mission to Jupiter's icy moon Europa in hopes of finding signs of life: A small spacecraft would drop a 20-pound ball onto the moon's surface, sending up a plume of icy material that the mother ship would then pass through, soaking up samples like a flying sponge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Joshua Lederberg, who won a Nobel Prize for discovering that bacteria could have sex, thereby establishing the foundation of modern genetics and biotechnology, died of pneumonia Saturday in New York City. He was 82. The prodigy's pioneering work while he was still in graduate school made him one of the first researchers to manipulate genes in a living organism.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Each July and August, blue ice lakes form on the surface of glaciers near the U.S. research station at Sondre Stromfjord in southern Greenland. Belying the pristine Greenland air and the clean-swept beauty of the glaciers, the bottoms of the lakes are covered with black organic goo. The tar is not the residue of an oil spill, nor is it any other detritus of civilization.
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