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Exosurf Drug

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August 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration said it has approved a drug that company studies have shown can cut by 50% the death rate in premature infants suffering from a severe lung disease. The disease, called respiratory distress syndrome, is the most common cause of death in infants younger than 30 days, the American Lung Assn. said in New York. The drug, Exosurf, mimics the action of lung surfactant, a liquid that helps keep lungs inflated.
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NEWS
August 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration said it has approved a drug that company studies have shown can cut by 50% the death rate in premature infants suffering from a severe lung disease. The disease, called respiratory distress syndrome, is the most common cause of death in infants younger than 30 days, the American Lung Assn. said in New York. The drug, Exosurf, mimics the action of lung surfactant, a liquid that helps keep lungs inflated.
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NEWS
July 27, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that it has authorized widespread use of an experimental drug to treat hyaline membrane disease, a serious respiratory ailment that is one of the leading causes of death and disability in premature infants. In 1963, the disease killed 2-day-old Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, a baby boy born to President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy. The condition, also known as respiratory distress syndrome, afflicts about one in five premature infants in the United States.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that it has authorized widespread use of an experimental drug to treat hyaline membrane disease, a serious respiratory ailment that is one of the leading causes of death and disability in premature infants. In 1963, the disease killed 2-day-old Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, a baby boy born to President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy. The condition, also known as respiratory distress syndrome, afflicts about one in five premature infants in the United States.
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