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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2012 | By Lisa Girion, Los Angeles Times
Burmese expatriates in Southern California love to talk about their homeland - its natural beauty, its people, its history. But, even after they leave Myanmar, many fear talking about the politics of the country also known as Burma. The election to parliament Sunday of Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi may begin to change that, some said. The election that resulted in a claimed victory for Suu Kyi and at least 10 other members of her party, the National League for Democracy, was the ruling junta's latest step to try to persuade the international community to ease crippling economic sanctions imposed in protest of the military's brutal grip on the Southeast Asian country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 19, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Daniel Swalm was researching his family when he came across a disturbing episode in immigration history. That discovery would lead to a move in the U.S. Senate to apologize for action the nation took more than a century ago. Swalm discovered that under an obscure 1907 law, his grandmother Elsie, born and raised in Minnesota, was stripped of her U.S. citizenship after marrying an immigrant from Sweden. Swalm had never heard of the Expatriation Act that required a U.S.-born woman who married a foreigner to "take the nationality of her husband.
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NEWS
September 4, 1992 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Braving a potential conservative backlash, a group of Vietnamese-Americans has formed the first nonprofit organization in Orange County to collect humanitarian aid for Vietnam. Joining forces gives the 10 expatriates who have formed the Social Assistance Program for Vietnam "more strength and power to help our people more effectively," said Bang Cong Nguyen, the group's chairman.
WORLD
February 19, 2014 | By Alexandra Sandels and Ramin Mostaghim
BEIRUT - A new, lesbian-themed music video by expatriate Iranian pop star Googoosh has sparked sharp debate among Iranians and controversy on social media forums in the Islamic Republic. It started on Valentine's Day when the video for Googoosh's latest song, "Behesht," or Heaven, dropped like a bombshell on the singer´s official Facebook page , which boasts more than 1,5 million followers. The video features a lesbian couple and seems to champion gay rights.  “I am scared of this doubt, I am scared of this blind alley,” Googoosh, 64, croons to the backdrop of a video showing a couple played by two well-known Iranian actresses.
NEWS
February 13, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vast majority of California's large community of ethnic Cambodians has apparently lost the right to vote in this country's coming national elections, a U.N. election official indicated Friday. Reginald Austin, director of the electoral unit for the U.N. Transitional Authority in Cambodia, said in an interview that only a "few thousand" expatriate Cambodians had managed to register by the close of registration in late January.
NEWS
May 30, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
String quartets still play during the cocktail hour at luxury hotels, blond children still ride their bikes along the broad avenues, the spouses of diplomats and foreign business executives still shop for luxury provisions at the cavernous Friendship Store on Beijing's main drag. After more than a week of martial law and mounting tension over student protests, troop movements and convulsions within the Communist Party, life remains normal--more or less--for the city's expatriate community.
OPINION
July 9, 2005
Re "Who Cares Where They Vote?" Opinion, July 3: I'm not sure on what grounds Wayne A. Cornelius makes his assertion that expatriate Mexicans living in the U.S. have little interest in politics in Mexico and thus will not "overwhelm Mexico in 2006." If recent elections, particularly the Los Angeles mayoral elections, are any indication of the participation of the Latino electorate, then expatriates will see the power of the vote. It is not just the most recent undocumented immigrants that have strong ties to Mexico that will vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON
In a rustic, soundproof room in Santa Monica, Alireza Meybodi fanned the flames of wounded Iranian pride as he recounted the latest assault upon his homeland's 2,500-year-old history. Five ancient mummies--including one believed to be that of Mandana, mother of the founder of the Persian Empire--have turned up in a merchant's home in Pakistan, the talk show host said during a recent broadcast from KSMI, or National Voice of Iran.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
Not even the Brazilians know how many Brazilians are in Los Angeles. Ten thousand is the most common estimate, but nobody's counting. Nobody's counting because, presumably, the Brazilians are too busy getting on with the business of enjoying life. Lawrence Christon, in his Times review of the musical "Oba Oba," lyrically (and accurately) limns the Brazilian nature as "full of style and grace, humor and opulence of spirit. . . ." Even among the L.A.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Poised behind his desk, a computer at his fingertips and a large staff at his command, the American executive seemed the prototype of hard-nosed corporate decision-making. Then the phone rang and it became sadly plain that he was master of all except his own life style. "There's this great new restaurant," the executive told his caller. "A friend has invited us for tonight. Can I go?" The caller knew the place. It is crowded, lively, open to the street and in a high-toned suburb.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
It's debatable whether the best love stories are also the "weirdest," as Emile Hirsch's character declares in "Twice Born. " But they do require chemistry, the missing piece in his pairing with Penélope Cruz. Set in Sarajevo before, during and many years after the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s, the drama is undone by hyperventilating poetics and a busy time-hopping structure. The usually subtle Hirsch flounders as American photographer Diego, who falls hard for older Italian graduate student Gemma (Cruz)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | Paloma Esquivel
One day late last year Norma Patricia Esparza, a respected professor of psychology in Geneva, got on a plane bound for an academic meeting in St. Louis. When the plane landed in Boston for a layover, police met her at the airport and arrested her -- for an 18-year-old slaying in Santa Ana. Esparza, 39, and three others are now facing trial in a homicide that has generated international attention. Prosecutors say that on a night in the spring of 1995, when she was a sophomore at Pomona College, Esparza went to a Santa Ana bar with a group and pointed out a man she said had raped her in her college dormitory.
WORLD
April 1, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
JABAL AL-ZAWIYA, Syria - The rebel commander Jamal Maroof was fiddling with his iPhone when a young man brought him news. People were complaining about the rebel checkpoints that dotted the more than two dozen villages under the control of Maroof's Martyrs of Syria Brigade. "The people are saying - " the young man began. "What are they saying?" Maroof demanded. Without waiting for an answer, he told an aide to prepare a statement about the checkpoints to be read during Friday sermons.
WORLD
February 27, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - The Syrian government appeared to make a significant concession to the opposition Wednesday, agreeing to renew the passports of millions of Syrians living abroad. A leading dissident figure had publicly pressed for the change. The state-run news service announced that the Interior Ministry had directed that expired passports be renewed for two years “regardless of the reasons that had earlier prevented their renewal, and without obtaining the necessary authorizations.” The pro-government daily Al Watan reported that the decision had been communicated to Syrian embassies abroad.
WORLD
August 20, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - Gu Kailai, wife of a former Politburo member and daughter of a revolutionary general, was given a suspended death sentence Monday for poisoning a British businessman inChina's most politically charged trial since the 1980s. The sentence was handed down by the Intermediate People's Court in the city of Hefei, and it confirmed widespread predictions that the court wouldn't dare put to death a member of the "red nobility. " The British Embassy in Beijing, which had sent consular officials to attend the court hearing, released a statement Monday morning saying it had requested that the death penalty not be applied.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The Festival of Earthly Delights A Novel Matt Dojny Dzanc Books: 462 pp., $23 Is there an English word for loopy openheartedness, for humor that careens into extremes but is grounded in surprisingly moving characters? "Vonnegutian" is too much for a book that doesn't try to reflect, in a larger sense, on the human condition, and it's a lot to put on a first-time novelist. But Matt Dojny's world view is so much the same: Maybe his book is "Vonnegutian"-ish. In "The Festival of Earthly Delights," Dojny takes us to Puchai, a small, fictional country in Southeast Asia.
WORLD
March 13, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
South Africa's highest court ruled that citizens living abroad should be allowed to vote in the general election April 22, but the move was not expected to hurt the ruling African National Congress. The ANC faces a challenge from the breakaway Congress of the People and growing frustration with corruption, poor services and widespread poverty and crime. But expatriate votes are highly unlikely to significantly narrow the ANC's expected margin of victory. The party still commands respect for its long fight against apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1994 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's Vietnamese Chamber of Commerce plans to sponsor a delegation that will travel to Vietnam in September for a meeting on business opportunities with President Le Duc Anh and other top government officials, chamber officials announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Tokyo is the most expensive city in the world for expatriates to live, topping a list on which half of the top 10 priciest places are in Asia. Osaka and Nagoya, both in Japan, are also on the list , as are Singapore and Hong Kong. The rest of the top 10 includes Luanda in Angola, Ndjamena in Chad as well as Moscow, Geneva and Zurich in Europe. The first time an American city shows up in the 214-city compilation is one-third down the list, with New York. But as the dollar strengthens against other currencies, other U.S. metropolises are rising in the ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2012 | By Lisa Girion, Los Angeles Times
Burmese expatriates in Southern California love to talk about their homeland - its natural beauty, its people, its history. But, even after they leave Myanmar, many fear talking about the politics of the country also known as Burma. The election to parliament Sunday of Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi may begin to change that, some said. The election that resulted in a claimed victory for Suu Kyi and at least 10 other members of her party, the National League for Democracy, was the ruling junta's latest step to try to persuade the international community to ease crippling economic sanctions imposed in protest of the military's brutal grip on the Southeast Asian country.
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