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OPINION
February 8, 2004
Apparently John Merrow does not understand that school principals are also politicians who will promote and enforce the latest educational fads in order to please those who are higher on the administrative ladder (Commentary, Feb. 4). If experienced teachers see the errors in these fads and voice disagreement, then they can easily be ushered to the most undesirable teaching positions, where they will ultimately fail and be removed. What will be left? Either inexperienced teachers or those who are just collecting a paycheck and agreeing to follow any new philosophy, even if it completely contradicts the previous trend.
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SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
Whether you think of it as HP Pavilion, the Shark Tank, its current corporate name, SAP Center, or "the cage" as Kings Coach Darryl Sutter colorfully offered, one thing is evident: The cage has become just that for the Kings in the playoffs, living quarters getting a little tight and the team possessing a championship pedigree unable to get out of town with a win. San Jose has recorded five straight victories at home in the playoffs against the...
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OPINION
April 4, 1993
With the glut of yahoos running for mayor of Los Angeles, wouldn't it be easier to go outside as we did for police chief and find an experienced, capable person? ROSWELL BOTTUM Van Nuys
SPORTS
March 27, 2014 | By Chris Foster
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Out of the mouths of Bruin babes. UCLA freshmen Zach LaVine and Bryce Alford decompressed in the locker room, a long day of chasing without reward over. LaVine looked up at Alford and said, "Man, no more games. No practice tomorrow. No meetings. It's just over. " Alford just nodded. Finality gave clarity even to the young. UCLA could go this far and no further. BOX SCORE: Florida 79, UCLA 68 Florida was bigger, deeper, more experienced. Florida was ready to move on. A 79-68 victory over UCLA in FedEx Forum on Thursday made that clear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1991
When I return to Philadelphia, I will bring back with me two memorable incidents I experienced during my visit here. I witnessed two policemen savagely kicking a man thrown on the ground at the corner of Santa Monica Boulevard and Bundy Drive. And for the first time in my life, I experienced an earthquake. I can't say I had a wonderful time. SHIRLEY MADSEN Philadelphia
OPINION
May 28, 2000
Re "Long Shadow of Gender Crimes," editorial, May 19: The Times justifies its call for congressional action on gender crimes by saying the matter is "a problem that is national in scope." On this specious basis any problem experienced commonly, though not jointly, by two or more states could be referred to Washington. The states, working with each other as necessary, should handle their own problems. Please, please don't further burden our already foundering national government!
OPINION
November 23, 2003
Re "More Vietnamese Immigrants Reaching End of Welfare Benefits," Nov. 1: Like the Vietnamese described in this article, many of us here in America have ancestors who, a few generations ago, were struggling to make their way. They did not "reach the end of their benefits," because there weren't any. They worked hard, learned the language and persevered. Whatever "social segregation" that they may have experienced fell away as they became an integral part of the fabric of the country.
SPORTS
August 7, 1994 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, a spunky sprite with a 1,000-watt smile and a girl-next-door name, Mary Lou Retton, vaulted from the Los Angeles Olympics across television screens into the homes of millions of Americans who fell in love with her. Sweet 16, 4-feet-9, a red-white-and-blue, stars-and-stripes ball spinning through the air, she made an entire country cheer on Aug. 3, 1984, when she landed firmly on her feet and flung up her arms, absolutely sure of a perfect 10 that gave her the first U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe DiMaggio Jr., the only child of baseball great Joe DiMaggio, died late Friday at a hospital in the Northern California town of Antioch, apparently of natural causes, hospital officials said Saturday. He was 57. He was the only son of DiMaggio and Dorothy Arnold, an actress whom the sports legend married in 1939. The athlete had no children with his second wife, Marilyn Monroe. The younger DiMaggio was estranged from his father and had seen him infrequently over the last few years.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | Chris Foster
This was Selection Sunday for most. This was do-over Sunday for UCLA and its coach. The Bruins were rewarded for their Pac-12 tournament championship. The NCAA selection committee made them the fourth-seeded team in the South Regional and allowed them to stay on the West Coast. UCLA (26-8) will play Tulsa (21-12) on Friday in the Viejas Arena on the San Diego State campus. It's the time of year college basketball players make memories ... or try to expunge them. A year ago, sixth-seeded UCLA was bounced from the NCAA tournament by Minnesota in the first round.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Lee Romney
KING CITY, Calif. - Angel Pineda tucked his white cowboy hat under a folding chair in the packed church hall and listened. First came the civil rights presentation - on what to do if pulled over by police. " I want a lawyer ," American Civil Liberties Union staffer Daisy Vieyra, who had come from San Francisco, enunciated in English. "I want a lawyer," the crowd repeated. Then came the indignation, as local residents and advocates from outside this southern Salinas Valley agricultural community made it clear that tomorrow's King City will not be the same as yesterday's.
SPORTS
February 18, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
SOCHI, Russia  - Youth was not served Tuesday. Instead, age was served on a rain-soaked platter. The four women who ruined 18-year-old Mikaela Shiffrin's red-carpet debut had a 33-year total age advantage on the young American. The top three finishers in the giant slalom were Olympic champions before they slid out of the start gate. The winner, Tina Maze of Slovenia, hadn't won a gold medal since … the women's downhill Feb. 12. FRAMEWORK: Best images from Sochi Maze, 30, probably has ski socks older than Shiffrin.
SPORTS
January 27, 2014 | Helene Elliott
As a child, Minnesota Wild defenseman Ryan Suter didn't hear many stories about his father, Bob, winning a gold medal as a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team. "Every teacher that I had, they were telling me all about it and wanted me to bring the medal in to school as often as I could," Ryan said. "I didn't know that much about it when I was younger, so they were more excited about it than I was. And that's where I learned how special it was. " No U.S. men's team has won gold since Coach Herb Brooks' underdog team upset the mighty Soviets and beat Finland in the Miracle on Ice, though Ryan's team lost to Canada in the 2010 finale at Vancouver.
SPORTS
January 22, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
MIAMI - The Lakers are losers in the standings but financial winners in a big way. They were declared the NBA's second-most valuable franchise, behind only the New York Knicks, in an annual report released Wednesday by Forbes. The Lakers are worth $1.35 billion, up 35% from the previous year, thanks mainly to their new television contract with Time Warner Cable. They earned $122 million last season from TWC, more than 20 times what the Charlotte Bobcats and Milwaukee Bucks received from their broadcasting partners, according to Forbes.
SPORTS
January 13, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers will have to wait a while longer for guard Xavier Henry to return from a sprained knee and abnormality of his lateral meniscus. According to a team spokesman, Henry experienced knee soreness on Monday after running through an on-court workout on Sunday. Henry will spend the next several days doing non-weight-bearing exercises. Dr. Steve Lombardo of the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic is to examine Henry, as previously scheduled, on Tuesday before the Lakers host the Cleveland Cavaliers.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN
The Murphy bed has fallen off the wall into the unprotected legal world of generic words. It landed in the same category as once-protected trademarks such as aspirin, thermos, escalator and nylon. For those of you who don't recognize the name, you may recall seeing a Murphy bed as the focus of slapstick comedians, such as Charlie Chaplin and the Marx Brothers. It is a bed concealed in a wall closet. At the turn of the century, William Lawrence Murphy invented and manufactured the first such bed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Comic actor John Ritter died on his daughter's 5th birthday in September 2003. The next day, his widow, actress Amy Yasbeck, told the girl that her dad's death was unavoidable. Since then, Yasbeck has come to believe the story she told their daughter Stella was wrong. "The doctors told it to me like I was 5 and I told it to her like she was 5," Yasbeck said in an interview with The Times. "The truth is, it's a lot more complicated and it's a lot more sad."
SPORTS
December 6, 2013 | By Bruce Arena, Special for The Times
My initial reaction to Friday's World Cup draw is the U.S.' group will be labeled a "Group of Death. " The U.S. will face Germany, Portugal and Ghana in the opening round, teams with a wide range of skills, styles of play and star players. However, I'm not convinced that the U.S. is a decided underdog. The Americans have intimate knowledge of all three teams, having played them over the last three World Cups. The U.S. is obviously familiar with Ghana, which eliminated the U.S. in the 2006 and 2010 Cups, and the Americans beat Germany in a friendly last June.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Katniss Everdeen, it turns out, is not the only person catching fire this fall. She's matched flame for flame by Nelson Mandela and his wife, Winnie, who burn with formidable fury in the sturdy biopic "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. " It is the incendiary work of British actors Idris Elba and Naomie Harris as the couple in question that elevates our involvement in this authorized film version of Nelson Mandela's autobiography. That, and the astonishing course of Mandela's life. For though it's a story we've heard so often that we perhaps take it for granted, seeing all the events of this remarkable journey laid out for us in a two-hour and 21-minute feature underlines its not-to-be-believed qualities.
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