Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsExplanation
IN THE NEWS

Explanation

SPORTS
January 8, 1986
Professional golfer Bob Toski, widely regarded as one of the best teachers of the game, has withdrawn from the PGA Senior Tour after admitting that he may have violated the rules of golf. In a prepared statement released by the PGA, Toski said: "In the late fall of 1985, one of my fellow players brought to my attention that I may have been violating the rules of golf by mismarking my ball.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1988 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday night at the drive-in. As the pale-skinned hero of the season's hot new martial-arts flick snaps the bones of the Asian archvillain, the Winnetka 6 erupts in honking horns and flashing headlights. The movie that has the big-wheeled pickups beeping is "Bloodsport." Advertised as the true story of an American who defeated all comers 13 years ago in a no-holds-barred international tournament of warriors, the movie opened last month at 800 U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
It was a bright Saturday afternoon in February, the sun suspended over a glassy sea, when Coast Guard searchers spotted two tiny points of white bobbing in the water off the coast of San Diego. The cutter moved in closer, and the two spots became the toes of Karen Waltz Roston's tennis shoes, floating in the still Pacific above her bruised and bloodied face--the first concrete indication that Roston's honeymoon cruise to Mexico might not have ended as her new husband had said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Matthew Fleischer
These are heady days for the online on-demand entertainment service Netflix. The company's stock recently surged 22% after a strong earnings report and news that it signed up 2 million new subscribers in the first quarter of the year. The company's success has largely been credited to its move into original content -- particularly its political drama “House of Cards.” With David Fincher on the creative team, the show follows the political trials and travails of mercenary Democratic House whip Frank Underwood and his equally mercenary wife Claire.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By John McWhorter
Few things stick out more in black American speech than the pronunciation of "ask" as "ax. " And when I say that it "sticks out," I'm being polite. Attitudes about Ebonics have evolved somewhat as hip hop has become America's favorite music. Even the strictest grammarian would have to agree that Kanye West's "Gold Digger" in standard English wouldn't be worth hearing. And Americans from Jesse Pinkman in "Breaking Bad" to Key and Peele get that it's OK to speak "hood" when you're among friends.
REAL ESTATE
April 20, 2008 | Ann Brenoff, Times Staff Writer
Kenny Chesney must have gotten word about the Malibu dress code: It's baseball caps, dude, not cowboy hats. What other possible explanation is there for the country music legend to have bought a house in the Carbon Canyon neighborhood for $7.4 million in February and then promptly re-listed it for sale at $7.95 million? The home, which was listed at $7.5 million when Chesney bought it a nanosecond ago, has expansive ocean views.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a physician, an eminent specialist. She was the model suburban mother, pitching in at her children's Camarillo school and pouring herself into activities at church. To most who knew them, Xavier and Socorro Caro were a couple enjoying the fruits of hard work, faith and family in a million-dollar hilltop home. But if their story illustrates anything, it is that even the iron gates of the most lavish estate can open wide for sadness, betrayal and deadly rage.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|