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Expletive

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
A comprehensive exploration of what has to be the handiest, most versatile and most divisive word in the English language, Steve Anderson's "****" (pronounced "****") opens just a few days after the Federal Communications Commission's reversal of an indecency ruling against CBS' "The Early Show."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
Things tend to get pretty loose in the fourth hour of "Today," but even co-hosts Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb were shocked when guest Elaine Stritch dropped an F-bomb on the show Tuesday.  The celebrated 89-year-old actress, known for her work on Broadway and in numerous films and television series, including "30 Rock," was making a visit to promote a new documentary about her life, "Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me. " Clad in a fabulous matching...
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Last year, when the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals curtailed the Federal Communications Commission's powers to punish networks for "fleeting expletives," many worried that network television would become a battlefield of exploding F-bombs and barely bleeped C-words. Turns out, all the decision, currently under review by the Supreme Court, did was unleash the "bitches. " Sure, there have been a few more "damns" and "hells" and S-words, some F-bleeps and a lot of playful word compounds beginning with "ass.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford is learning that a bad situation can always get worse.  Video has emerged that shows him angry and out of breath, ranting about killing someone. "It's first-degree murder!" "No holds barred. " "He dies or I die. " "I'll rip his ... throat out. " The Toronto Star has the video (caution: there's a lot of profanity), possibly taken with a cellphone. The release of the footage by the news outlet spurred another apology from Ford -- who recently admitted to and apologized for having smoked crack cocaine .  He calls the video "extremely embarrassing" and says he was "extremely inebriated" at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Say what you want about Steven Tyler's famous lips, but it's hard to deny that they have a way with the F-bomb. During the 10th season of "American Idol," the singer dropped enough of them to blow up a small European country, and a network-censored montage that aired during the show's finale captured many of his best ones: "That was [bleep]-ing crazy good! Holy [bleep], what did I say?" "Slap that baby on the [bleep] and call me Christmas!" "Hellfire, save matches, [bleep] a duck and see what hatches!"
MAGAZINE
June 14, 1987 | ALAN PRENDERGAST, Alan Prendergast is the author of "The Poison Tree: A True Story of Family Terror," to be published in paperback this summer by Avon.
"HEN-REE!HEN-REE!" Henry Rollins walks briskly to the front of the small church, a blur of muscle and tattoos. It is a stormy Saturday night in Denver, the last stop on Rollins' three-week, coast-to-coast "spoken word" tour before his return to Los Angeles. The crowd of about 200 is an unlikely combination of neatly dressed college students, bohemian hipsters, bearded biker types and a few mohawk-crested punks. One ardent fan calls out as Rollins passes by: "Hen-reeee!"
SPORTS
August 14, 1999
Well, let's get that [expletive] Mondesi the [expletive] out of here if the [expletive expletive] is so [expletive] unhappy about making 10 million [expletive] bucks a [expletive] year for batting a lowly [expletive] .248. I mean, what the [expletive] is going on here? If that [expletive expletive] thinks he could earn 10 [expletive] dollars an [expletive] hour, much less 10 [expletive] million [expletive] dollars a year, in the real [expletive] world, he's out of his [expletive] mind, such as it is. ALLEN E. KAHN Playa del Rey My response to reading Raul Mondesi's comments is that he can go bleep himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000
Nixon had his enemies list. Now, following in the Grand Old Party tradition, George W. has begun his own "expletive deleted" list. BARBARA HOWARD San Clemente
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990
There it is for all the world to see: The Times is a practitioner and therefore an advocate of expletive censorship, as evidenced by Calendar's Oct. 7 cover. TRACY C. WINKLER Cerritos The reference is to a line from Wendy Wasserstein's Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning play "The Heidi Chronicles." The character Heidi is asking Scoop what mothers tell sons that they don't tell daughters. The line, as it appeared on the cover: "I mean, why the (expletive) are you so confident?"
SPORTS
November 17, 2002 | Baltimore Sun
Locker room speeches cover a wide range of topics and situations. Here are a few examples of some memorable NFL speeches: * During his brief tenure with the Jacksonville Jaguars in 1996, wide receiver Andre Rison took exception to a speech made by Coach Tom Coughlin before a game against New England. Coughlin warned the Jaguars about Dave Meggett, and said they would keep the game close until the fourth quarter, when they would win it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Matthew Fleischer
FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski's tweet over the weekend -- dismissing the notion that the FCC would pursue action against stations that broadcast Red Sox slugger David Ortiz's F-bomb in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing -- may be the most talked about 140-character missive ever from a government official -- or at least one that didn't involve photos of his anatomy. “David Ortiz spoke from the heart at today's Red Sox game. I stand with Big Papi and the people of Boston,” Genachowski tweeted.
SPORTS
January 23, 2013 | By Matt Wilhalme
Losing stinks. It's frustrating. It gets NBA coaches fired, and apparently, also leads to "blistering expletive-laced" confrontations between players and general managers, at least that's what happened in Phoenix, according to a Yahoo Sports report . Sixteen-year pro Jermaine O'Neal and Suns General Manager Lance Blanks reportedly had a heated  exchange of words after the team's first practice under newly named Interim Coach Lindsey Hunter....
NEWS
December 26, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
While the holiday theme song for about 12 million unemployed people this year might as well have been “All I want for Christmas is a job,” that has never stopped the young and/or clueless from taking to Twitter with their own, less sympathetic ballad: “All I wanted for Christmas was an iPad.” And when they tweet of disappointment for not getting the latest, expensive Apple gadget or (cue “The Price Is Right” voice) “A NEW CAAAR!”, they are often met with unexpected, widespread hatred in return.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Last year, when the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals curtailed the Federal Communications Commission's powers to punish networks for "fleeting expletives," many worried that network television would become a battlefield of exploding F-bombs and barely bleeped C-words. Turns out, all the decision, currently under review by the Supreme Court, did was unleash the "bitches. " Sure, there have been a few more "damns" and "hells" and S-words, some F-bleeps and a lot of playful word compounds beginning with "ass.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Say what you want about Steven Tyler's famous lips, but it's hard to deny that they have a way with the F-bomb. During the 10th season of "American Idol," the singer dropped enough of them to blow up a small European country, and a network-censored montage that aired during the show's finale captured many of his best ones: "That was [bleep]-ing crazy good! Holy [bleep], what did I say?" "Slap that baby on the [bleep] and call me Christmas!" "Hellfire, save matches, [bleep] a duck and see what hatches!"
NATIONAL
April 28, 2011 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
Donald Trump brought his presidential flirtation to Las Vegas Thursday night, portraying President Obama as a weak leader and pushing an aggressive foreign policy agenda that involves, among other things, extracting oil from war-torn countries as the price for American protection. "In the old days, when you won the war, it was yours," Trump said to applause. "When we win a war … we leave with nothing. " He added: "I'm interested in protecting none of them unless they pay. " Speaking in a casino ballroom, the combative developer and reality television host seemed to embrace this town's let-loose ethos, delivering a wide-ranging and expletive-laced speech that touched on topics including Obama's citizenship and drilling off the Gulf Coast.
NEWS
December 26, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
While the holiday theme song for about 12 million unemployed people this year might as well have been “All I want for Christmas is a job,” that has never stopped the young and/or clueless from taking to Twitter with their own, less sympathetic ballad: “All I wanted for Christmas was an iPad.” And when they tweet of disappointment for not getting the latest, expensive Apple gadget or (cue “The Price Is Right” voice) “A NEW CAAAR!”, they are often met with unexpected, widespread hatred in return.
NEWS
August 19, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breakthroughs in audio technology may enable researchers to recover an 181/2-minute gap in a conversation between President Nixon and his chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, taped shortly after the Watergate burglary. The White House chat was thought to be lost forever when the president's secretary, Rose Mary Woods, "accidentally" erased the recording. Here's our best guess at what was lost: Richard Nixon: The [expletive deleted] intellectuals hate me anyway. H.R.
SPORTS
April 9, 2011 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
Go into any English soccer stadium on any given Saturday afternoon and you are assured of hearing language that would curl a nun's toes. So why is such a fuss being made of Wayne Rooney and his latest bit of Neanderthal behavior? Mostly because it makes good copy, that's why. It titillates television viewers, and it sells tabloid newspapers. For those who have not been paying attention, here is a brief rundown of the latest contretemps to embroil the Manchester United and England millionaire misfit.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Meg James, Los Angeles Times
In a sharp rebuke of the Bush-era crackdown on foul language on broadcast television and radio, a federal appeals court on Tuesday struck down the government's near-zero-tolerance indecency policy as a violation of the 1st Amendment protection of free speech. The ruling is a major victory for the broadcast TV networks, which jointly sued the Federal Communications Commission in 2006. The case was triggered by unscripted expletives uttered by Bono, Cher and Nicole Richie on awards shows earlier in the decade, and the court's decision calls into question the FCC's regulation of foul language and other indecent content on the public airwaves.
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