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OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Perhaps it's not a big surprise that "12 Years a Slave," the acclaimed movie based on the true story of a free black man who was sold into slavery in the 1840s, won the Academy Award for best picture. It had already won critical acclaim and praise for its lead actors, director and writer (all of whom were nominated for Oscars as well). Besides, as Ellen DeGeneres, the host of the show, joked at the beginning of the evening, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voters had only two options: Either they could bestow their highest honor on "12 Years a Slave," or they were all racists.
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NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
"I feel a bit like a spoiled child with all these beautiful things around me," says Belgian designer Dries Van Noten, giving a tour of the spectacular new exhibition chronicling his nearly 30-year career, which opens Saturday at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. He's referring to the wealth of artworks from the Renaissance to the present day on view as part of "Dries Van Noten: Inspirations. " The show is a tour of his creative mind, placing his runway collections in context of his many cultural reference points.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By David Pagel
Scott Reeder's first solo show in Los Angeles does double duty, two times over. At 356 S. Mission Road, the multipurpose extravaganza is both an exhibition of big abstract paintings and the set for “Moon Dust,” a DIY film that the Detroit-based artist has been working on for eight years. Reeder's movie is made with amateur actors on a set that is more "Captain Kangaroo" than "Star Wars. " It takes place on a lunar resort that has seen better days and looks as if it's going out of business.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By M.G. Lord
Propaganda today has a nasty connotation; it suggests something cheesy, manipulative, in the service of a dishonorable cause. During World War II, however, cinematic propaganda became an elevated art, practiced with unusual expertise by five great American movie directors: John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra and George Stevens. Hitler threw down the gauntlet with Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will" (1935), propaganda so captivating that it impelled even gentle Germans to thump their chests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
Transportation officials are considering several options that would pave the way for closing a dangerous street-level rail crossing on the Los Angeles-Glendale border. For years, the two cities have butted heads over the Doran Street crossing, which rail officials have said has the highest potential for disaster out of 312 crossings because of an adjacent propane facility, tanker truck traffic and vehicles that regularly stop on the tracks. Glendale has been pushing to close the crossing, but Los Angeles has argued it needs to remain open for emergency access.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
What does a company do when it retrieves government-confiscated building materials? If that company is Gibson Guitar Corp., it makes guitars from it. Late last year, the 120-year-old Nashville music company released a limited series of Les Paul, Explorer, SG and Flying V six-string guitars with fingerboards made from wood that federal agents had seized in factory raids. The company produced 750 instruments for that first batch, which quickly sold out. Responding to continued demand, Gibson this year released about 1,000 more Government Series guitars, which sold out "in minutes," according to Chief Executive Henry Juszkiewicz.  PHOTOS: Daughters of rock stars   "We kept getting calls, and we had wood left over," said Juszkiewicz, 60. Those who still want to get their hands on a Government Series Gibson guitar might have to resort to EBay, though.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Angels owner Arte Moreno met with officials from the City of Tustin last week to discuss the possibility of building a new baseball stadium, a team spokesman confirmed Saturday. One potential site would be the decommissioned Marine Corps Air Station, which would be accessible via the 5, 405 and 55 Freeways and is across the street from the Tustin Metrolink train station. "We did have an initial meeting with Tustin," said Marie Garvey, a consultant retained by the Angels to handle stadium negotiation issues.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Tickets have just gone on sale for “ The 2nd Annual Garagiste Festival: Southern Exposure ,” returning to Solvang's Veterans Memorial Hall March 29 and 30. And if things go anywhere near like last year, they won't last long. An offshoot of the original Garagiste Festival held in Paso Robles in November, this one ferrets out cutting-edge, small-scale wine producers from the Santa Ynez Valley and Santa Barbara County. Last year's Southern Exposure was a sellout. And at $50 per ticket, it's still pretty inexpensive for such a wildly exuberant and fun wine event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
When Max Wong first "outed" herself to her neighbors, she wondered when the police would be knocking on her door. Until then, she had kept her passion a secret. But Wong said most of her Mount Washington neighbors were simply puzzled. Beekeeping? Illegal? In Los Angeles? "It's the yummiest way of breaking the law," said Wong, one of the backyard beekeepers who is pushing for Los Angeles to allow apiaries in residential zones. In a city so proud of its orange trees and urban greenery, "beekeeping should never have been illegal," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
The Los Angeles City Council took its first step Wednesday to explore whether beekeeping should be allowed in residential zones, asking city staff to report back on the idea. Backyard beekeepers want Los Angeles to join New York, Santa Monica and other cities that allow residents to keep hives at home. Existing Los Angeles city codes do not allow beekeeping in residential zones, according to city planning officials. Beekeeping has nonetheless blossomed among Angelenos worried about the health of honeybees and devoted to urban farming.
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