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NEWS
April 25, 1995 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the eager conservative Republicans who swept into Washington on an anti-government tide last fall has been caught up in the far-reaching fallout surrounding the Oklahoma City bombing. Freshman Rep. Steve Stockman (R-Tex.) has been thrust into the limelight to explain how he received an anonymous fax about the bombing and his own links to anti-government militia groups.
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NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Oklahoma City set Aug. 7 for the start of a preliminary hearing that will decide whether conspirator Terry L. Nichols stands trial on state murder charges in the federal office building bombing case. Associate District Judge Robert Murphy Jr. set the date during a contentious hearing for Nichols, 44.
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NEWS
October 25, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Government investigators have put together a reconstruction of the moments before the Oklahoma City bombing, which indicates that the fuse attached to the bomb was lit inside the rental truck even before the Ryder vehicle came to a stop in front of the federal building. According to sources close to the case, the re-creation was done with the help of at least two video cameras located near the Alfred P.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | From Associated Press
Timothy J. McVeigh admitted his involvement in the Oklahoma City bombing during a lie-detector test given by his lawyers, Newsweek magazine reported. But McVeigh failed a question about whether all his co-conspirators are known to investigators, and that may suggest that others were involved in the April 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the magazine reported in this week's edition. The report of the test is attributed to anonymous sources close to the investigation.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-government activist James D. Nichols received a low-key welcome home to Michigan's "thumb" region Tuesday from a small group of friends, neighbors and fellow farmers who tended his crops while he was in custody on federal explosives charges and as a possible material witness in the Oklahoma City bombing. Nichols tearfully told reporters earlier in the day that he wanted "to try to get my life back together" by returning to his farm chores.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a terrorist's bomb to introduce America to the Oklahoma City Fire Department, an unsung force that has galvanized the nation with unflinching courage and down-home charm. But here in Oklahoma's capital, where a special sales tax generates $20 million a year for fire services, nobody is surprised that the men and women of the OCFD have emerged from the rubble as heroic figures in the public eye.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
James D. Nichols, who is being held as a material witness in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing, once told a neighbor that Timothy J. McVeigh was testing homemade bombs and that it was possible to build one large enough to destroy a federal building, an FBI agent testified Tuesday. The FBI agent, Randal Farmer, said the conversation occurred after the neighbor visited the Nichols farm and smelled chemical fumes near a large shed. "My brother and an old Army buddy are out making bombs."
NEWS
April 22, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They do the dirty work, literally. On their hands, knees and sometimes their bellies, about 300 members of search and rescue teams brought in from around the country have gone about the grim and tedious task of sifting through the rubble of the federal building here, looking and listening for bomb survivors. "Our team hasn't found anybody alive yet," said Capt. Erik Heyer of the Phoenix search and rescue squad. "Just one would make us feel a lot better."
NEWS
April 26, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why Oklahoma City? Although that remains one of most puzzling mysteries of last week's devastating car bomb attack, there is growing speculation here that the answer may lie with a low-key agent who heads the local field office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He is the same agent who gained prominence two years ago when he served as the chief government spokesman during the long siege and fiery destruction of the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Tex.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Casting doubts on defense theories that a severed leg found in the Oklahoma City federal building rubble belonged to the "real bomber," authorities said Wednesday that the limb was that of an unidentified black woman. The conclusion, announced by state medical examiner Fred Jordan in Oklahoma City, boosted the official death toll from the April 19 bombing to 169. Defense lawyers for accused bomber Timothy J.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Finding no legitimate claim of negligence, a federal judge has thrown out attorney Johnnie Cochran's lawsuit against an explosives company whose fertilizer may have been used in the Oklahoma City bombing. The lawsuit, filed on behalf of 250 victims and survivors, accused ICI Explosives USA Inc. of illegally selling "explosive-grade" ammonium nitrate and failing to add an ingredient that could make it less volatile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1996 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the ashes of horrific destruction and indescribable tragedy, something spiritually good arises. It is a message Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating and his wife, Cathy, have expressed to the nation in the year since the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building tattered the physical and psychic fabric of their state. It was a message they brought to Orange County on Sunday during a service attended by about 2,700 people at the Crystal Cathedral.
NEWS
March 12, 1996 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In evidence that could lead to separate trials in the Oklahoma City bombing case, two key government witnesses maintain that Timothy J. McVeigh and Terry L. Nichols had a major falling out in the critical period between when the bomb ingredients were purchased and the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was destroyed.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The sister of bombing defendant Timothy J. McVeigh says if she's called to testify, it would be for the prosecution, "Dateline NBC" reports. "I love my brother to death and I want nothing more than to support him and be on his side," Jennifer McVeigh said in excerpts of her interview released Wednesday by the TV news magazine. "Yet I really had no choice but to, you know. And if I get called to testify, it's going to be for the prosecution." McVeigh and Terry L.
NEWS
February 5, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A lawyer for bombing defendant Timothy J. McVeigh said he has hired a London law firm to investigate claims that an international conspiracy was behind the Oklahoma City bombing in April. At the same time, London's Sunday Times reported that the FBI is investigating claims that British and German neo-Nazis helped plan the federal building bombing. "The attorney general herself said the FBI would certainly be justified to look at a European connection," McVeigh's lawyer, Stephen Jones, said.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. attorney in Oklahoma City and his prosecution team plan to bow out of the federal building bombing case if the trial is moved out of the state, a departure that could put the government at a serious disadvantage, officials said Thursday. Steve Mullins, executive assistant U.S. attorney for the prosecution team here, told The Times that the local U.S. attorney's office has "all but decided internally" that it would be prudent to step aside should U.S.
NEWS
April 22, 1995
June, 1984: Denver talk show hose Alan Berg is killed by machine gun by persons linked to neo-Nazi Robert Mathews. December, 1984: Robert Mathews dies in a fire started by FBI flares after a 35-hour standoff at a house on Whidbey Island near Seattle. He was accused of shooting an FBI agent.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Just hours after a deadly car-bomb explosion at a federal building in Oklahoma City, bomb threats forced the evacuation Wednesday of hundreds of workers from the FBI's headquarters in Santa Ana and from the Anaheim City Hall amid an air of heightened security and jittery nerves at government buildings across Orange County.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her arms crossed, her legs shaking, her voice soft and trembling, the sister of accused Oklahoma City bomber Timothy J. McVeigh struggled Wednesday to portray her brother as a decent man who has been "unfairly demonized" and who feels terrible for the great tragedy that struck here last April. "He's not this evil thing that people make him out to be," Jennifer McVeigh said. Her comments came as she talked publicly about her brother for the first time.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came to court carrying pictures of their dead, more than 100 of them braving zero temperatures and crowding before dawn Tuesday into the federal courthouse, determined in their unity to show a judge that Oklahoma citizens should decide the Oklahoma bombing case. Doris Jones clutched a studio portrait of her daughter, Carrie Lenz, a federal drug agency employee who was six months' pregnant when the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building took her life on April 19.
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