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Explosive Chemicals

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1991 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State health authorities have shut down a self-storage lot in Long Beach to remove a cache of highly explosive chemicals discovered by city officials more than two years ago but never taken away. A team of state toxic chemical experts, the Los Angeles County sheriff's bomb squad and the U.S.
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NATIONAL
June 27, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A Saudi man accused of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction in Texas was found guilty Wednesday by a jury in federal court in Amarillo. Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari, 22, was living in Lubbock, Texas, on a student visa at the time of his arrest last year. Authorities began investigating Aldawsari on Feb. 1, 2011, after they were contacted by employees at chemical and shipping companies who reported suspicious orders he had made. Among the orders was one for phenol, a toxic chemical that can be used to make the explosive trinitrophenol, or TNP, similar to TNT. Federal agents traced Aldawsari's purchases and secretly searched his computer, email and his off-campus apartment near Texas Tech University.
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WORLD
October 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Five men were convicted today of plotting a terrorist attack by collecting bomb-making instructions and purchasing explosive chemicals in Australia's largest terrorist conspiracy. A jury deliberated for a month before finding the men guilty of conspiring to commit acts in preparation for a terrorist attack. Each faces a maximum sentence of life in prison. During the trial, which began in November, prosecutor Richard Maidment told the jury in New South Wales state Supreme Court that the men planned to use explosive devices or firearms to commit "extreme violence" in a bid to force Australia's government to change its policy on Middle East conflicts.
WORLD
October 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Five men were convicted today of plotting a terrorist attack by collecting bomb-making instructions and purchasing explosive chemicals in Australia's largest terrorist conspiracy. A jury deliberated for a month before finding the men guilty of conspiring to commit acts in preparation for a terrorist attack. Each faces a maximum sentence of life in prison. During the trial, which began in November, prosecutor Richard Maidment told the jury in New South Wales state Supreme Court that the men planned to use explosive devices or firearms to commit "extreme violence" in a bid to force Australia's government to change its policy on Middle East conflicts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | MACK REED
Rocketdyne President Paul Smith has mailed a letter to 530 neighbors of the firm's Santa Susana Field Lab, offering explanations for the 1994, chemical explosion that killed two scientists there and brought felony charges and a $6.5-million fine against the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | MACK REED
Rocketdyne President Paul Smith has mailed a letter to 530 neighbors of the firm's Santa Susana Field Lab, offering explanations for the July 26, 1994, chemical explosion that killed two scientists there and brought felony charges and a $6.5-million fine against the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1986 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
A highly explosive chemical stored illegally at a Sun Valley chemical manufacturing plant was seized by a city-county task force Friday and taken to Burbank Airport, where it was detonated in an empty field, authorities said. Authorities said the chemical was found at California Bionuclear Corp., 7654 San Fernando Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1991
A man who admitted throwing a mildly explosive chemical onto the stage during a taping of the "Arsenio Hall" show was sentenced Monday to 120 days in jail for the prank. Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner Barry Taylor also ordered Michael Dignan, 20, "not to own, use or possess any explosive chemicals or devices" and to pay restitution to others in the audience who may have been injured or had their clothing damaged by the substance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1988
A county bomb squad, a hazardous materials team, health officials and a robot designed to handle bombs converged on a Tustin public storage space Friday after learning it was jammed with potentially explosive chemicals. Bottles filled with crystallizing liquid, some of it seeping out under the caps, were packed floor to ceiling in a 5-by-5-by-8-foot rental unit at Public Storage, 14861 Franklin Ave., said Orange County Fire Capt. Patrick McIntosh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1986 | PATRICIA KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
Crews wearing protective clothing and breathing apparatus began removing 3,200 containers of hazardous materials Monday from a Sun Valley plant cited for improperly storing toxic, radioactive and explosive chemicals. The removal of chemicals at the California Bionuclear Corp., 7654 San Fernando Road, was conducted with no apparent problems, said Mike Qualls, a spokesman for the Los Angeles city attorney's office. A private company is moving the chemicals at California Bionuclear's expense.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion at a Bayer plant in Institute shook the area for 10 miles and sent at least one worker to the hospital with third-degree burns. Kanawha County Manger Brent Pauley says the explosion happened around 10:50 p.m. at the Bayer CropScience plant, in an area that makes pesticides. Authorities urged residents nearby to stay in their homes as a precaution.
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive explosion caused by volatile chemicals ripped through a Manhattan commercial building Thursday, scattering sheets of glass and debris on the streets below and injuring 42 people, 12 critically. Officials said the blast, which badly damaged the facade of a 10-story structure in the Chelsea neighborhood, appeared to be an accident. But in a sign of the times--with worries about terrorism--victims who were taken to hospitals were screened for exposure to radiation, just in case.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
Thousands of people fled homes on both sides of the Ohio River on Sunday as a fire in a fertilizer plant burned through tons of potentially explosive and toxic chemicals. Authorities waited for the fire to burn itself out at the Cargill Inc. plant, which was not in operation when the blaze broke out at about 2:30 a.m. There was no immediate indication that anyone was in the plant at the time. One firefighter suffered a minor injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | MACK REED
Rocketdyne President Paul Smith has mailed a letter to 530 neighbors of the firm's Santa Susana Field Lab, offering explanations for the 1994, chemical explosion that killed two scientists there and brought felony charges and a $6.5-million fine against the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | MACK REED
Rocketdyne President Paul Smith has mailed a letter to 530 neighbors of the firm's Santa Susana Field Lab, offering explanations for the July 26, 1994, chemical explosion that killed two scientists there and brought felony charges and a $6.5-million fine against the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1993
Sending a ball of flame 15 feet high, the Orange County sheriff's bomb squad blew up an explosive chemical outside an industrial laminating factory Wednesday after its discovery forced the evacuation of 80 workers. An employee of Laminating Company of America at 7311 Doig Drive discovered nearly a liter of the dangerous chemical in a freezer Wednesday morning. The substance--ethylene glycol dimethyl ether--apparently had been stored and allowed to crystallize after its use in a research project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1987 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
The owner of a Sun Valley chemical manufacturing company was sentenced to 60 days in County Jail and fined $15,000 Friday after pleading no contest to 10 misdemeanor charges of state radiation-control violations and fire-code violations. Riad M. Ahmed, 46, owner of California Bionuclear Corp., also was ordered by Los Angeles Municipal Judge Elva R. Soper to perform 500 hours of community service, Deputy City Atty. Keith W. Pritsker said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1986 | DAVE PALERMO and GARY JARLSON, Times Staff Writers
A 37-year-old South Laguna man was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of dumping hazardous chemicals that forced authorities to close Ortega Highway in south Orange County on Jan. 13, authorities said. Richard Duane Leavitt was booked into Orange County Jail on one count of felony illegal dumping, according to California Highway Patrol Lt. Mike Bair of the San Juan Capistrano substation. Bail was later set at $100,000.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1992 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Engineering and construction giant Fluor Corp. on Monday announced a partnership with Hercules Aerospace Co. in Utah to pursue the multibillion-dollar market for disposal of obsolete or defective non-nuclear weapons. The companies will offer their services to both government clients and private defense contractors. Financial terms of the non-exclusive agreement will be determined on a project-by-project basis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1991
A man who admitted throwing a mildly explosive chemical onto the stage during a taping of the "Arsenio Hall" show was sentenced Monday to 120 days in jail for the prank. Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner Barry Taylor also ordered Michael Dignan, 20, "not to own, use or possess any explosive chemicals or devices" and to pay restitution to others in the audience who may have been injured or had their clothing damaged by the substance.
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