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Expo Line

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Local transit officials Tuesday outlined plans to permanently repair the flawed intersection of two light-rail lines in downtown Los Angeles that had raised safety and maintenance concerns. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority asserts that the repair should prevent further problems at Washington Boulevard and Flower Street, the busiest junction in Metro's 87-mile rail network. Officials plan to slightly narrow the width between the rails along 15 feet of track where the popular Blue Line curves to merge into the recently opened Expo Line before the route heads into the Metro Center station.
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BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
The Los Angeles technology scene isn't getting the respect it deserves, a situation that the city is looking to change, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Wednesday. At an event in West L.A., Villaraigosa said that despite a boom in new start-ups, so-called Silicon Beach still suffers from perception issues and funding problems that have hindered it from reaching its potential as a major tech hub. “We're known as the entertainment capital in the world, but we're not known for Silicon Beach, and that needs to change,” he told a crowd of reporters and tech enthusiasts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
In a city that is often derided for its lack for public transportation, downtown L.A. is the one exception. The city center has light-rail lines, a subway, a maze of bus routes and shuttles, links to commuter rail and even a tiny funicular that trudges up and down Bunker Hill. But many residents and developers say that it can still be difficult to get around the far-flung city center without a car. So urban planners and downtown boosters have spent considerable time on what may have once been considered impossible: creating a truly car-optional neighborhood in the center of a region defined by its car culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
A blue-eyed boy sat on a skateboard, a helmet on his head, and stared pensively down a busy street. A pair of white wings extended from his shoulders. Above him were the words, "Angels come in various sizes. " Created out of spray paint, he materialized on the side of a Culver City building less than two years ago. To street art fans, the massive mural was the work of a German duo called Herakut. Most passersby just saw it as a nice way to spruce up a former car dealership that had long stood empty.
OPINION
November 2, 2012
Re "Clear the tracks," Opinion, Oct. 29 Jim Newton writes that some vociferous objectors in Cheviot Hills are launching another effort to block the Expo Line's construction. This action is ironic. The route of the Expo Line is not a new one; most of it follows the Pacific Electric Railway's Santa Monica Air Line, last used for freight in the 1980s. The Red Cars that ran along that route until 1953 were noisier than the sleek cars planned for the new service. But the residents of this very same area were most vociferous in retaining the service and kept it running for nearly 30 years (since the early 1920s)
OPINION
October 29, 2012 | Jim Newton
Few tensions more regularly complicate the political life of Los Angeles than those between neighborhood residents and "outsiders" wanting to alter those neighborhoods for what they see as the larger good. Those stresses underscored the conflict over the downtown football stadium, and they are at the heart of controversies over expanding the port and Los Angeles International Airport. Most recently, they have been at the center of a last-ditch effort to stop the Expo Line's anticipated extension to the Westside and Santa Monica, where the goals of traffic relief and decreased air pollution are competing with the anxieties of some Cheviot Hills residents who don't want trains to pass near their homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
In the wake of criticism about the safety of the new Expo Line, transit officials are installing more warning signs and precautions for pedestrians and motorists at 21 street crossings along the light-rail route. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority plans to spend $287,500 to improve crosswalks, pedestrian warning signs and traffic signals from Washington Boulevard and Flower Street to Jefferson and Hauser boulevards. Among the safety enhancements are more fencing, louder train horns and, under certain circumstances, speed restrictions of 15 mph at stations.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Construction has kicked off on a $63-million apartment and shopping complex near a light-rail station on the edge of downtown Culver City as developers move to capitalize on the new Expo Line. The six-story project is being built by Santa Monica apartment landlord NMS Properties. The development at 9901 Washington Blvd. in Los Angeles, across the street from Culver City, will be known as NMS@Culver City. It will house 131 units over restaurants and shops. The complex is across from the Kirk Douglas Theatre and Sony Pictures Plaza office building.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2012 | By Roger Vincent
Construction has kicked off on a $63-million apartment and shopping complex near a light-rail station on the edge of downtown Culver City as developers move to capitalize on the new Expo Line. The six-story project is being built by Santa Monica-based apartment landlord NMS Properties. The development at 9901 Washington Blvd. in Los Angeles, across the street from Culver City, will be known as NMS@Culver City. It will house 131 units over restaurants and shops. The complex is across from the Kirk Douglas Theatre and Sony Pictures Plaza office building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
The top executive of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority has asked the agency's inspector general to investigate an alignment problem on the new Expo Line that experts say presents a risk of derailment if left uncorrected. Art Leahy, Metro's chief executive officer, announced during Thursday's board meeting that he had directed Inspector General Karen Gorman to look into the junction at Washington Boulevard and Flower Street, where the Blue and Expo light rail lines merge just south of downtown Los Angeles.
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