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Export Quotas

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BUSINESS
December 28, 2010 | Reuters
China announced Tuesday that it will cut its export quotas for rare earth minerals by more than 11% in the first half of 2011, further shrinking supplies of metals needed to make a range of high-tech products after Beijing slashed quotas for 2010. China produces about 97% of rare earth elements, used worldwide in high technology, clean energy and other products that exploit their special properties for magnetism, luminescence and strength. The rare earth issue may further strain relations between China and the United States, which have been battered this year by arguments over everything from Tibet and Taiwan to the value of the Chinese currency.
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BUSINESS
December 28, 2010 | Reuters
China announced Tuesday that it will cut its export quotas for rare earth minerals by more than 11% in the first half of 2011, further shrinking supplies of metals needed to make a range of high-tech products after Beijing slashed quotas for 2010. China produces about 97% of rare earth elements, used worldwide in high technology, clean energy and other products that exploit their special properties for magnetism, luminescence and strength. The rare earth issue may further strain relations between China and the United States, which have been battered this year by arguments over everything from Tibet and Taiwan to the value of the Chinese currency.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Japan will maintain voluntary restrictions on its auto exports to the United States in the coming year, sticking to its self-imposed quota of 2.3 million cars, the government said today. The limit will stay only as long as Japan is concerned about a resurgence of car exports to the United States, and the Trade Ministry will remove the curbs as soon as it is satisfied that the exports will not increase, Minister for International Trade and Industry Hiroshi Mitsuzuka told reporters.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2009 | Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
In filing its first major complaint of unfair trade practices by accusing China of restricting competitors' access to raw materials, the Obama administration raised hopes among U.S. manufacturers and unions that it would move aggressively to defend their interests in the global economy. But whether the complaint filed Tuesday on behalf of U.S.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1988 | Associated Press
The International Coffee Organization has moved to tighten supplies in an effort to stabilize prices. The 74-nation body of producer and consumer countries--empowered under treaty to regulate supplies and prices of coffee beans--announced Tuesday that the export quota for the present quarter had been cut by 1 million bags. The reduction brings the total global quota for the current 1987-88 coffee year down to 55.5 million bags. One bag equals 60 kilos, or 132 pounds.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1993 | From Reuters
Acting before President-elect Bill Clinton takes office, Japan said Friday that it will retain self-imposed limits on car exports to the United States for another year. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry said the quota for the 1993-94 fiscal year, which begins in April, will be 1.65 million units, the same as the previous year. Analysts said MITI is aiming to strike a balance between the interests of Japan's ailing car makers and fears of trade retaliation from the new U.S.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | United Press International
The snake and scorpion venom business has become so profitable that officials in the Soviet republic of Azerbaijan have imposed export quotas. The official Tass news agency said Monday that Ayaz Mutalibov, leader of the southern republic, signed a decree controlling the export of the venom, along with medicinal herbs and other folk medicine. The law also sets up snake and herb farms to increase the profitable business.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1987 | From Associated Press
Coffee futures prices took a nosedive Monday as hope waned for efforts to renegotiate international export quotas. On other markets, grain and soybean futures were mostly higher, most livestock and meat futures advanced and energy futures were mostly lower. The meeting in London of the International Coffee Organization appeared on the verge of breaking up without any agreement on export quotas for the 1986-87 season, said Sandra Kaul, an analyst in New York with Shearson Lehman Bros.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2007 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The weak dollar produced economic benefits in August as U.S. exports rose sharply, helping shrink the country's trade deficit to its smallest size since January, the government reported Thursday. Economists had been expecting for months that the cheap dollar, which in recent weeks has traded at record lows against the euro, would spur exports, said Gary Hufbauer, an economist with the Peterson Institute for International Economics. A weak dollar can help U.S.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | From Reuters
China said Tuesday that it planned to launch a quota system to check its booming exports of textiles, a mechanism to help implement a deal reached with the European Union this month that eased trade friction. China canceled export quotas at the start of January as part of a global move to end textile quotas. But surges in textile and clothing exports upset the European Union and the United States, which sought to impose safeguards.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton sought Wednesday to rev up consensus among factory workers in favor of global commerce, as his administration enters potentially pivotal negotiations with China and the opening of controversial talks to lower international trade barriers. At the same Harley-Davidson motorcycle factory here 12 years ago, a very different president, Ronald Reagan, delivered much the same message.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1998 | From Associated Press
OPEC has promised a sweeping global deal to slash oil production and rescue the collapsed market, but now it has to show it means business. "This is the last-chance saloon," said Leo Drollas, chief economist at the Center for Global Energy Studies in London. "If they don't produce a credible agreement, I think they will be consigned to oblivion, forever. No one will believe they can do anything, even in a crisis."
BUSINESS
March 24, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The role of Venezuela and Mexico in driving Monday's surge in oil prices demonstrates the shifting power balance on the world petroleum scene as producers outside the Middle East, especially Venezuela, gain greater clout, analyst said.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Penalizes China for Textile Shipments: The U.S. slapped a $19-million charge on China for shipping textile products in violation of a 1994 trade accord. The penalty, announced by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, was levied after the U.S. Customs Service determined that China was attempting to circumvent textile export quotas by shipping more than 2 million garments to the U.S. through seven countries.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Penalizes China for Textile Shipments: The U.S. slapped a $19-million charge on China for shipping textile products in violation of a 1994 trade accord. The penalty, announced by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, was levied after the U.S. Customs Service determined that China was attempting to circumvent textile export quotas by shipping more than 2 million garments to the U.S. through seven countries.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Agriculture Exports Expected to Drop by $2 Billion in '97: The Agriculture Department forecast that farm exports, hobbled by tight supplies and stiff competition, would fall by $2 billion in fiscal 1997 from this year's record $60 billion. The department predicted that despite strong prices, wheat, feed-grain and cotton export volume would drop and shave sales of those commodities by $4 billion.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudis Favor OPEC Quota Freeze: Saudi Arabia threw its weight behind a new freeze on OPEC supply quotas to boost sagging world oil prices. The linchpin of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries also expressed displeasure on the eve of OPEC talks in Vienna over alleged quota violations by some cartel members. Persian Gulf sources said Saudi Arabia saw a freeze on the current OPEC ceiling of 24.52 million barrels daily for at least six months as a way to raise prices.
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